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Full text of "Hardware merchandising (July-December 1903)"

HARDWARE AND METAL 



A 




ALWAYS READY FOR USE 

NO HONING 
) NO GRINDING 




No Hard Blades Razor. 
No Soft Blades 
No Temper Streaks 
No Returned Blades to tbe dealer — 
Will Shave for Years Without Re- 
quiring Honing 



cBELTING 



'•Your 'Para' Rubber Belting baa proved 
in every way quite satisfactory." 



Canada Paper Co:, 

Montreal. 



THE 



Retail Price $2.00 



Firm 
or 



BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll ask for 
a copy with 
trade discount. 



Mfrs. of 



453-461 Broadway, New York City. 




OSTEIN 

* Cutlery 



Canadian RubberC° 



■ ^v-:>isir»»( 



MONTREAL •;> TORONTO 
W/NNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee'' Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30 "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also ol 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 

Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 50. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, ete. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 



No. 60. 

Poeket Magazine 

Sorew Driver. 



Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AM) METAL 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

•« Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm b. stewart. MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel. 94. 27 Front St., West, Toronto. 



The celebrated NATIONAL CUTLERY CO. 

have spent nearly half a century in manufac- 
turing high-class shears of all description' 
Skilled labour and the knowledge of th< 




quirements isj^the base or foundation upon 
which the National Cutlery Co. have founded 
their business in this and almost every country 
in the world to-day. 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS, 

Montreal, Quo. 

Can be bought through all jobbers. 
Write for catalogue. 



Sausage Staffer, Lard 
and Fruit Press 




TRADE 



ENTERPRISE 



MARK 



8 Sizes and Styles J 

- I 

Rapid Grinding and • 

Pulverizing Mills ' 
| s • * mid Btylet 
for Hand and Power 



Meat and Food Choppers 

UCTINNED-^ 

40 Sizes arid Style./ for Hand arid Power 
from $ 1. 00 to $300.00 



Meat Juice Extractor 




No. 3, $5.50. 

Bone, Shell and Corn 
Mill 




No. 750. 17-50 




No. 12, $2.75. 
Sold by all the leading Jobbers of the Dominion 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE MAILED FREE 



The Enterprise Mfg. Co. of P&w. 




No. 21. $2.50 



Raisin Seeder 




No. 36. Si. 00 



• Cold Handle Polishing 
IRON 



Philadelphia, Pa... U. S. A. 




No. 82, $7.50 per doz. 



HARDWARE AND MFTAI 



YOU NEVER SAW A SAW SAW AS WELL AS THE DISSTON SAW SAWS 



DISSTON'S SAWS 




• 



j .... . . .... 



DISSTON'S No. 12— Hand, Rip, and Pane! Saws, extra refined London i 




DISSTON'S No. 4— Mitre-Box Saw, 18, 20 and 22 inches, 4 inches wide, highest quality steel blade'apple handle. 
DISSTON'S No 6— Bucksaw Blades, patent ground and tempered, set and sharpened, 30, 32 and 34 inches. 




V$ QJL Cxi 



DISSTON'S CANADA WEBS— 42, 48 and 54 inches, cast steel, warranted, patent ground. 



^V<MMwk 



DISSTON'S ST. LAWRENCE— One-man Cross-cut Saw. finest quality spring steel, 4 and 4K feet. 




Q^ 










.-*»" vD, Si ''*"'*«. 
£larranU5y_yJSupt r i or 

CATRA THIN BACK 







■^-■nr,sr,^sr,s^r.r,rrr:r^^ r rs^^ 



r^/rr 



DISSTON'S CHAMPION No. I — Broad Cross-cut Saw. thin back, first quality cast steel, 4H, S, SM and 6 feet. 



w 



TON& 



SAW MAKRKS TO THR WORLD. 



N 



S B R O 



AORNTS TO THR CANADIAN PKOPI.I-. 



s. 



& 



s. 



o. 



TORONTO, 

87 YORK ST. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



HEAD 
OFFICE, 



MONTREAL. 



SHIP 
QUICK 



OTTAWA. 

54 QUEEN ST. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Galvanized Netting. 

SEASON 1904. 




Best quality Steel Wire Galvanised before woven. 
3 ply rope selvage. 
Easiest to c.ect. 

When placing your orders stipulate for Greening's 
make. Do not accept the cheap inferior goods 
that are now flooding this market. Our make is 
very little higher in cost, but by far the cheapest, 
quality considered. 



The B. Greening Wire Co., 

LIMITED 

Hamilton, Ont. - Montreal, Que. 




COPPER WIRE 

Palafraph. I. I. phone, Trolley 
and Tiansiiiir.si.tn Lines. 

BRASS WIRE 

(If nil kinds iiixl fur all purposes. 

PLAIN WIRE 

A.incuMMi, Annealed itnd oiled, 
Tinned, Coppered, Bright and 
Ooppered Spring Wire. 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

l'.>r Telegraph anil Telephone— 
Burt' Win', Plain Twist Galvanized 
Coiled Spring Fencing; Galvan- 
ized Wire, Hlraighiened and cut 
any length for fenee purposes. 

BALING WIRE 

For Lathee, Shlnglee, Pulp, Hay, 

Huns, etc (Straightened, cut any 
length. 



WIRE NAILS 

of all kinds and for all purposes 

WOOD SCREWS 

Flat Head, Hound Head, 

llright and limns 

BRIGHT STEEL 
WIRE GOODS 

Gate Hooks and Eyes— Screw 
Hooks, Serew Eyes. 
Jack Chain Single Steel 

and Brass. 
Jack Chain- Double Steel 

and Brass. 
"Crescent ' Hat and Coat Hooks. 
Wire Door Pulls, Cotter Pins. 

STAPLES 

Poultry Netting, Barrel, Blind, 
Bed and Fence. Special Staples 
made to order. 



Manufactured by 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

LIMITED 
MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 

HEAD OFFICE °WiSS& MONTREAL 

Long- Distance 'Phone to all Departments. 



2 






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1 1 1 1! 

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lit It 












J 



CfCLOlE LAWN AND CEMETERY FENCE. 

We build it from 24 inch to 42 inch high, from 14c. to 
19c. per running foot. The best' and strongest in the 
market. We build farm fences and gates of all sizes. 

Cyclone Woven Wire Fence Co., Limited 

Write for price. ^"» TORONTO 




WOVEN WIRE 
FENCING 



Made from No. '.< hard 
steel wire throughout. 

Hade to sell, lo last, 
and to give satisfaction. 
That is why the IDEAL Is 



THE BEST SELLER. 

If not represented there, write for catalogue anr 
[■rices. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 




' elled In quality. 
THE 



Prompt shipment 



McGregor-Banwell fence Co., 



WINDSOR ONT 



Limited. 



YOUR CUSTOMER'S INTEREST IS YOURS 

It pays the farmer to use our High-Grade 
Coiled and Plain Wires, Selkirk Fence 
Machines and Patent Steel Gates. 

It pays you to sell them to him. 

Sold only through the trade. 

Send for a catalogue and "Our Mode of 
Doing Business." 

Selkirk Fence Co., W eu. B d. ont. 



Established 1854. 
Phone Main 1706. 



the GEO. B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron and Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth, 
Moulders' Riddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 

Work - 117 Kingr St. West, TORONTO, ONT. 



THE MOST COMPLETE STOCK 



Brass a nd Copper 



in Shsets, Tubas. Wlro and Rod. 



Service Right, 
Quality Right, Prices Right 



WATERBURY BRASS GO. 



122 to 130 Centr* St., 



Now York City. 



Always hare our classified Stock 
List before you. 

YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 



Will persons addressing advertisers 
kindly mention having seen their adver- 
tisement in The Canadian Hardware and 
Metal Merchant. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

That's what a shelf bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Hkt 
TKR, Nothino CheaI'KR than tin- BRADLEY 
STEEL BBAOKBT It li well Japanned, Rtrong 
and Light The saving In freight u a good profit, 
aside from the lower prioeal e*hiohtbe Roods are 
hoKI. Order direct or through your Jobbei 
ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., VI. 8. A. 

Steel Stamps, Machine Plates, 

Steel Letters & Figures, Brass Labels, 
Trade Checks, Stencil Inks, 

Stencil Brands. 

All first class. Send to the.... 

HAMILTON STUMP 4 STENCIL WORKS, 

HAMILTON, ONT. 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue name oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MAN'FG. CO , 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
0. S. Branch: 2S9 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 




A FENCE 

to Protect 
and Adorn. 

Made of steel rods In different sizes and heights to adapt it to the various requirements, the 

Hartmatl Steel Picket Fence 

is the most popular on the market. Adapted alike to 

Lawns and Private Property, Parks, Cemeteries, Schools, Church Lots, etc. 

It preserves Its alignment, is handsome In appearance and permanently serviceable. Catalog 

free on application. Write for it. 

CUYAHOGA WIRE A FENCE COMPANY., Dept W.CUYAHOGA FALLS, OHIO. 



li. 


Kutabllahed Cable Addreaa. 
18S2. "BLiaa." 

MAN H KACTt-RKHH 

Wood Turnings, Hand, 

Bench and other Screws 

Mallets, Handles, Vises 

Clamps, Tool Chests 

Croquet, Lithographs 

Wood Toys, Novelties 

and also tbe celebrated 

Wood's £■«•"« Car 

Gate 

For Street and Steam Rail- 
road Cars. 
The R. BLISS MFG. CO. 

Pawtuoket.'R.I , U.S. A 


P^^^^i^Kiniiiumi^uuiiiislv^i 
— ^i"" T: 


•fJlP^V fh>t*t 


4tfc 


__ ■ ~~ f \ 



Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
73 YEARS ESTABLISHED 1823. 75 YEARS 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



u 



Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, 8a -m and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular sod Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, Nlckle, etc., always In stock. 

Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Oold Street, New York. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardware! Hardware! 

i Lumbermen, Contractors, and .Merchants Of the Ottawa Valley— Has it ever 
occurred to you that you could Save a Profit and get exactly what the Trade 
Requires by purchasing your supplies from 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Limited 



Wholesale 
) ware Merch 



,?„?, Ottawa, Ont. 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE. 



P. S.-SEND FOR PRICES. 



ATKINS c7o H sr c D u E T SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO. ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, TEM 
'OSS-CUT h3/\ WW k3 PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VICTOR. TIJ-, ri_E TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 



1 — i°°" 



,;;'v:?r?H. 



1 ME VICTOR 
LANCE fkJ^TOOTM 

E.CAIMriSi. CO INDIANAPOLIS 

ISMtriTn*'); 




p £ AITKIN ^> aSC CO Lbading MAKOFACTUKhRs op HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 

INCORPORATED # ' CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kinds. 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. Write for Catalogue and Prices 

II P HUBBARD. Salos Agent tor Canada Toronto Office ; 30 Fronl si. Easl Tel Main 1896. 



Eclipse SnoH Shovel 
Round Handle 



No. 19 



Eclipse Snow Shovel 
T Top 



Ecllpie Steel Sftanfc 
Snow Shovel 



Eclipse Shan* 
D Top 



Eclipse Railroad Eclipse 

Snow Shovel Grain Shovel 




No. 25. 



No. 26. 



No. 27. 



The Eclipse Manufacturing Co., Limited, - Ottawa Ont. 

Mai .f -i I.I.I. -MJ\\ BHOVEU3, GRAIN SHOVELS, Etc Only Wholesale Trade Supplied. 

6 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



R. B. 



D V A CC 9 f*f\ PORT TALBOT, SOUTH WALES, 
D T MOO 06 \J\Jmm GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELING 



BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES, RECTANGLES, Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 



Brands "SKER," and SKER BEST." 

xport Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Sole Canadian Export Agents, 



Cable address : " CROLLO," LONDON. 



WALKERS QUICK^EASY ICE-PICKS 



SEVERALOTHER STYLES ILLUSTRATED INOUR 1903 CATALOGUE. 



Ymade of crucible steel, oil tempered, anti-rust, nickel plated. v - 
* will not bend, break or rust. each one tested and guaranteed. 

Erie Specialty Company. Erie Pa 



DURHAM 



HOSE 

"Durham" BELTING* 

PACKING 



Order 



Brands 



Our "DURHAM " Brands are a guarantee of 
good quality, and the large and Increasing de- 
mand proves that their merits are recognized. 

GET SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



D&OC 



R 



mited 



OWMANVI LLE.UNTARIO 



0, 



^ 






»^«l»M»HMi 






I 




Why Dunlop? 

Yes, some merchants have wondered why so 
mam of their customers insist on the Dunlop 
Trade Mark on their bicycle tires, lawn hose, 
rubber heels, pneumatic and solid rubber carriage 
tires, rubber mats, etc. There is just one reason 
for it. They want the very best and they know 
the\ get it in 

Dunlop Quality. 

THE DUNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO, CANADA. 

Depots at Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



I »i» M i HM llni l UM ^ MM w u lN ^W i K i U PIi^Ml 






HARDWARE AND METAL 




the "PERFECT" 

LOOSE AXLE. 
No I. jiii WHEELS. 
•• I 1 ..,. 4 in. 
in. 



STEEL 
BARN DOOR HANGERS 

AND 

TRACK. 
1 i 1 1 8 1 1 

STEEL TRACK, 1 in. r 3/16 in., WROUGHT BRACKETS. 
l',m.x 316 in., MALLEABLE 
MADE IN i, 6, 8 and 10 feet lengths. 




th E "ATLAS" 

ROLLER BEARINGS 
No, 0. Bin, WHEELS., 

" 1. 8% in. " 

" 2. 4 in. 



WE ARE THE ONLY MAKERS IN LARGE QUANTITIES IN CANADA. 



OUR QUALITY AND PRICES EQUAL, AND OUR FINISH EXCELS, ALL 
FOREIGN-MADE GOODS OF THIS CLASS. 



When ordering specify our make, and you will not only get better value, but 
will keep good Canadian money circulating in Canada. 



Manufactured by. 



TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, GUELPH 

AT THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HARDWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 



Kem|> 




COLD 

BLAST 

LANTERNS 



If your customers 

want a Lantern that 

won't blow out 

" smoke 

" leak 

" break globes 
but will give a per- 
fect light in any wind 
sell them Kemp's. 

The acme of per- 
fection in lantern 
making. They will 
not cost you more 
than other makes. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 




Wise Buyers 



Want... 



Best 
Values 



Be Wise and 



PERFECTION WIRE CHAINS 




-MADE IN- 




COW TIES. 


Smoothest 


HALTER CHAINS, 


Strongest 


DOG CHAINS, 
TRACE CHAINS, 
HOBBLE CHAINS 


HENCE THE 

BEST /MADE 



SPREADER CHAINS nd for STALL FIXTURES. 

WE STAND BEHIND OUR GUARANTEE. 

McKINNON DASH & METAL WORKS CO., 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT. Lin,ited 

FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 4, 1903. 



NO. 27*. 



Subjects Being Discussed at Ottawa. 

Written for Hardware and Metal by a Member of Parliament. 



WHILE! nothing is more 
talked of to-day through- 
out the British Empire 
than Chamberlain's pre- 
ferential scheme, we still 
find that the British Government is slow- 
to recognize minor chances of developing 
trade with Canada; trade which, though 
producing not very much perhaps in the 
individual rases, would nevertheless ag- 
gregate a verj considerable amount. 
Several weeks ago we had an article in 
this paper as to the unfairness of the 
British cattle embargo as applied to 
Canadian cattle, an unfairness which 
must be patent to the English them- 
selves, but which they seemingly refuse 
to remove, because they want for their 
farmers the protection which the embargo 
indirect! j gives then:, and at the same 
time do not wish to admit what they 
consider the heresy of a protective 

measure. 

Another rather annoying little matter 
came to light through an article pub 
lished in The Montreal Gazette, as to 
shipment of cattle for South Africa. It 
seems that the British Government is 
now engaged in restocking the farms 
there, from which the cattle were com- 
mandeered during the war. If this could 
be done by exporting: from the herds at 
home. or from any other colony, no 
objection could be made, but we learn 
that the supply is being drawn from 
Texas ports. When we remember the ex- 
treme unfriendliness of the people of this 
section of the United States, displayed 
towards Britain in the late war, and 
compare it with the sacrifices made by 
Canada, it does strike one as rather 
more than strange that a British colony 



should be overlooked, and the enemy, so 
to speak, favored commercially. Just 
how many cattle will be required for the 
purpose, the article in question does not 
state ; but the number must be very 
large when we remember the complete 
of the clean-up, ami the fact that a 
large part of the industry of the con 
quered countries was in cattle raising 
Tn one shipload alone 2,500 are to be 
taken, but this of course will be but a 
small fraction of the whole. It is stated 
that great care is being taken in the 
selection of the cattle ; but surely we 
produce as good in Canada as anywhere 
else on the continent. 

Nor can the matter be attributed to 
stupid oversight on the part of the 
British officials entrusted with the pur- 
chase. Mr. Borden, the leader of the 
Opposition, read the article in toto, and 
asked the Government if attention had 
been directed to what was going on as 
therein outlined, and, if so, what steps 
had been taken to turn the current of 
this trade to our own shores. Mr. 

Fisher, the Minister of Agriculture, in 
replying on behalf of the Government, said 

that some time since his department had 
been seized of the facts and had at once 
put itself into communication with the 
Canadian High Commissioner in London. 
Lord Strathcona. That gentleman had 
twice communicated with the Imperial 
authorities, but without result, We re- 
peat, then, that we cannot allow the ex- 
cuse that the matter has been allowed to 
id through ignorance. It may be, 
since we know that cattle, like people, 
partake of physical peculiarities accord 
ing to the climate in which they have 
been raised, that the Texas animal is 
9 



better adapted to the din. ate of E 
Africa than a Canadian beasl would lie. 
but it seems that we are treated to no 
explanation, c/ood, bad or indiffe 
• an it be that English officialdom agrees 
with Senator Depew that Canada is the 
spoiled child of Britain, and are they in 
clined to give us a little scourging for 
the good of our souls ? We have no 
objection whatever to the English poli \ 
of cultivating the most friendly relations 
with the United States ; we agree with it, 
but always with a large proviso that in 
so doing Canada the eldesl boo in the 
family of young nations— should not be 
given the go-by. It is just such cast 
ill-- one quoted that give to the enemies 
of British connection ;i text for their 
arguments, and while we feel sure that 
the masses in Britain would gdadly on 
all occasions give us the preference, we 
are just as conscious that the p 
that be. to,, oft, -ii. forgel us for out 
neighbor to the south. 



Probably the most remarkable charac- 
ter in the House of Commons is "^T r 
Gourley, the member for Colchester. Mr 
Gourley is a man of education, a lawyer 
by profession, a wide reader, and a very 
thorough gentlemai in the truest 

of the word. When he speaks, however. 
the members sit back and prepare ; 
joj themselves. \,, reading; of i 
papers then, no writing of letters, n,, 
• j 1 1 1. • t snooze to make up for the late 
session of the night before. but 
tancv Bits enthroned on <■• Nor 

does the speaker ever fail to live up to 
expectations. Mr. Gourley's main 
characteristic is his faith in the futui 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



uda, ami his extreme contempt for 
the United States. Extracts from his 
snerally find their way int«> 
American newspapers, and are invariably 
! by Bhowen "f letters from 
irate citizens of the great Republic, who. 
if they wen bu1 present, would enjoj * l » • - 
whole thing with that infinite test which 
all those south of the line have for any- 
thing of an amusing character. 

Mi Gourley's latest opportunity came 
when the Grand Trunk Pacific Hill was 
before the House, and never did he rise 
to greater heights. Completely carried 
away by his own enthusiasm and by the 
encouraging cries of the members who 
wanted to Bee just what he oould do, the 
honorable gentleman l«- f t his desk an<l in- 
vaded the Boor of the House, where his 
emphatic gesticulations placed in 
jeopard) the Hansard man, who was en- 
deavoring to crystalize his utterances 
into history. As the proceedings since 
our last issue have been rather dull and 
of a routine character, we feel justified 
for the edification of our numerous read- 
ers in devoting some little space to his 

utter ana 

* « • 

Mr Gourley has immense faith in rail- 
road building as a means of developing 
a country. He looks with disdain upon 
our modest 18,000 miles of road, and an- 
nounces, " We are just on the threshold 
of railway building in Canada. We have 
no railways in Canada. The country is 
almost as barren of them as it was on 
the day when Jacques Car tier arrived, 
and I hope his spirit is not looking down 
upon the people of Canada to-day. There 
never was a greater heritage than was 
en to the people of Canada, and no 
people ever dealt with a greater heritage 
in so mean and miserable a manner as 
the people of Canada have." For this 
Mr. Gourley largely blames the people of 
Ontario, who, parsimonious in the past, 
are now crying out that the time has 
come to prohibit further aid in the con- 
struction of railways in this country. 
He has hopes, nevertheless, for he sees 
new men growing up in our old province 
who give promise of better things. Again 
he breaks forth upon our undeveloped 
state as follows : "We have the Canad- 
ian Pacific Railway stretching up through 
the country, but as far as any develop- 
ment is concerned, the country is in 
about as undeveloped a state as it was 
when the Tndian chiefs saner their war 
songs on the banks of the Ottawa." In 
speaking of the magnificent extent of 
Canadian territory by land and sea Mr. 
Gourley says : " Why, you could take 
the Haltic sea and drop it into James 
Bay and it would scarcely cause a ripple 
on the surface." Later on in his =[ ceeh 
the member for Colchester gives us a 
strong hint of a source of early inspira- 
tion, inspiration which seems - o hn.va 



convinced him that we can make our- 
selves great bv talking about our great 
ness. lie was present, he tells us, at a 
fourth of July celebration in a r'ual 
part of the State of Illinois, a nd listened 
to an orator on that occasion. What 
did he say ? asks Mr. Gourley. " There 
was a little rise in the land, scarcely 
perceptible to a Nova Scotian, who is 
accustomed to beautiful mountains, and 
that man described that hill as infinitely 
greater than the Alps, and the little 
brook that ran through his community 
rivalled in his mind the fabled Nile, or 
the glorious Rhine. Sir, that is the 
teaching thai has helped the people of 
the United States to become great. 
Their leaders told them that they were 
the greatest people on earth, and that 
they have achieved more than any other 
people, and I will give them that credit, 
while detesting their very existence." 
Shortly thereafter Mr. Gourley branched 
of? into a comment on the constitution of 
the United States. Just what that had 
to do with the G.T.R. charter it would 
probably be hard to tell, but the Speak- 
er did not interfere, and the following de- 
liverance was the result : "Tf you ask 
me to say what was the worst constitu- 
tion in the world, I would say that it 
was either the tyranny of Algiers or the 
tyranny of the United States. When 
they want a government what have they 
got ? A senate, a tyrant for six years ; 
a House of Representatives, a tyrant for 
two years, a President, a tyrant for four 
years ; and a Supreme Court which 
bosses them all eternally and forever. 
The result is, that a man who lives in 
the United States has four tyrants to 
deal with, whereas in Algiers you have 
only one, and if you fix him you fix them 
all." A few lines further on Mr. Gour- 
ley states that he is going to devote the 
next few years of his life to showing that 
the only government worth living under 
is that of the old red-cross flag of Eng- 
land. Tf the British Empire is large 
now, what will it be when Mr. Oourley's 
crusade is finished ? Surely long before 
that time his hope, expressed in another 
part of his speech, a hope to see the 
flag of England floating over the entire 
globe, will be realized. 
• » * 

While advocating the building of im- 
mense stretches of road, Mr. Gourley 
leans more particularly towards the 
Trans-Canada, and this because he fav- 
ors its northern route as being far away 
from our dangerous boundary. He calls 
it an "Imperial railway." and gave the 
House a glowing picture of the way in 
which the Yankees would come a cropper 
in the next war with Canada if this road 
were only built. This led to the most 
amusing incident of the speech. Draw- 
ing a parallel with Napoleon's Moscow 
10 



campaign he said. "We Could retreat." 

But Mr. Gourley had warmed the mem 

bers into a belligerent mood. " Never," 

they shouted. 

Mr. Gourley : "Yes, the Boers have 
taught us that retreat is verv often the 
beginning of victory." 
"The members ; "Never retreat." 
Mr Gourley: "Then when the sum- 
mer " 

The members : "Never retreat." 
Mr. Gourley ' "We could retire." 
The members : "Oh, Oh, never retire." 
Mi. Gourley: "We could retire as a 
strategical necessity." 
Members : "Never." 
Mr. (Join lev: "Let me put my point. 

We could retire as a " 

Members : "Never, never." 
Mr. Gourley, (finally allowed to pro- 
ceed,) we could retire, and in the end, 
the snows of winter coming on, the in- 
vaders would be compelled to retreat." 
* # # 

Against the enormity of longer allow- 
ing the Grand Trunk to have a terminus 
at Portland, outside of Canadian terri- 
tory, Mr. Gourley spoke out from the 
shoulder. "Every man in this Parlia- 
ment ought to be horse-whipped for al- 
lowing such a state of things. If we 
had a proper national spirit in this 
country not one of us would escape 
chastisement." 

Just once was the honorable gentleman 
called to order by the indulgent chair. 
He had passed westward in his wild 
career, and was speaking of our Pacific 
sea-board having been largely filched by 
the Americans, and he described the land 
taken as "a narrow strip whether 30 
miles or GO miles wide, stolen by a lot of 
greedy Yankees from a lot of improvi- 
dent Englishmen. You call them states- 
men, I would be sorry to think that any 
school-boy in Oanada was so stupid as 
these statesmen were." Mr. Gourley 
promptly apologized, and shortly there- 
after concluded what is probably the 
most remarkable speech ever delivered on 
the floor of Parliament. 

One sound point he did make which was 
somewhat new to the House. He advo- 
cated a cash bonus to the railways to 
be assisted, and that the lands on both 
sides should be opened as to but half 
their extent for free homesteads, the 
alternate sections being reserved for sale, 
expressing the opinion that in a very 
short time these reserved lands would 
bring in the market not only enough, 
but far more than enough, to pay back 
the cash voted to the roads. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment; 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

United 
HAMILTON, ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



M 1 



CANADIAN GOODS IN ENGLAND 

R. WALTER GROSE, of Montreal, 
representing The Gurney-Tilden 
Co., The Nicholson File i'o. and other 
hardware manufacturers, has just returned 

from tile Old Country, where, being 
acquainted with many of the leading busi- 
ness men, he had opportunities of learn- 
ing the feeling towards recipro al trade 
relations with the colonies among those 
who would be most affected by ii and 
were in a position to pass the most 
authoritative judgment upon such an 
arrangement. 

Mr. Grose was struck by the apparent 
strong following which Mr Chamberlain's 
preferential tariff ideas had attracted, and 
he found several of the largest British 
manufacturers who were prepared to back 
him up in them. Main Liberals also 
had admitted that his arguments were 
verj strong, and that the feeling in favor 
of them was rapidly gathering strength. 

"I noticed a great main Canadian- 
made agricultural implements in the Eng- 
lish market," said Mr. Grose, "and they 
are highly thought of. They certainl) 
compare most favorably with any o( the 
American-made goods, and a slight tariff 
preference in favor of our manufactures in 
this line would do wonders. Canadian 
stoves and furnaces are also much in 
evidence, and the importation of them is 
decidedly on the increase. Lawn mowers, 
carriages and wooden ware of all kinds 
are in demand, and in great main stores 
I noticed furniture manufactured by the 
Canadian Furniture Co. 

"All these linesand many more Canadian 
articles are being sold in large quantities 
on the English market. Colonial goods 
are in as great favor as even those of 
domestic make in Great Britain, though 
there is apparently a little prejudice against 
American manufacturers. Main manufac- 
turers in the old land are now recognizing 
that free tiade is no longer doing l hem 
good. In the vicinity oi Birmingham 
1 saw two agricultural factories closed up, 
and the men had left the country. 

" I think there is no doubt but that the 
preference is coming. This fall a campaign 
will be commenced in favor ot it, and all 
indications point to a majority for the 
preference. " 



NEW YORK IRON AND STEEL 
MARKETS 

Buyers o( foundry iron continue to with- 
hold orders except for such as they need lo 
cover pressing requirements of consump- 
tion. Many melters are said to be getting 
final deliveries on existing contracts, but 



A Summer Paint Specialty. 



The Sherwin-Williams Screen Enamel is a summer 

paint specialty that ought to be on every dealer's shelves. 

There's no other screen enamel that sells so well as 
that and gives so much satisfaction to the user. It pays a 
handsome profit. 

Screen Enamel does not gum up the wire, and leaves 
a fair gloss that prevents dust, dirt, and moisture from remain- 
ing on the screen. It also prevents rust. 

It is put up ready for use in half-pint, pint and quarter 
gallon tin cans. Packages are attractively labeled and present 
a good appearance on the shelves. 

Write to-day for prices and information. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 



NEWARK, 
BOSTON, 
KANSAS CITY, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
LOS ANOELES. 
MINNEAPOLIS, 



MONTREAL. 

TORONTO, 

WINNIPEG. 




CANADIAN DIVISION 



HEADQUARTERS, 4 PAINT FACTORV, 

21 St. Antoine Street. Montreal. 

VARNISH FACTORV. 

St. Patrick Street, Montreal. 



TORONTO DEPOT, 

si York Street. 

WINNIPEG DEPOT, 

I it Bannatyne Si. , East. 



are reluctant to enter into fresh engage- 
ments lor extended deliveries, owing to 
the belief that the bottom of the market 
has not vet been reached. Philadelphia 
advices are to the effect that the makers 
of Pennsylvania foundry are willing to 
shade SMI for No. 2 X foundry and add 
that somewhere between I hat figure and 
$18 it is likely that a good deal of 
business could be had. English markets 
were cabled higher, Scotch warrants re- 
covering the (Id. loss recorded yesterday, 
while Middlesboro foundry iron advanced 
4&d. In this section an improved de- 
mand for steel billets is noted, but the 
s. ik's are all o( small lots. Negotiations 
are said to be pending on large quantities, 
however. Finished 1 material is reported 
lo be steady, but not much new business 
is coming up, though improvement in 
this regard is expected during the coming 
month. — New York Journal of Commerce, 
June 24. 

11 



A "KICK." 

Says a Montreal wholesale hardware 
dealer: "The Canadian Pacific Railway 
claim to be able lo handle all the freight 
between here and the West, and no doubt 
the) are doing all in their power to accom- 
plish the undertaking. But we have 
twentv cars on the way to Winnipeg, some 
ot which went mil some lime ago, and 
none of them has reached there vet. This 
is the case with other hardware houses, 
and with the continued growth o\ the 
Northwest, resulting in increased ship- 
ments to points there, something will soon 
have lobe done. An awkward state of 
affairs is likely to arise with hardware 
merchants in the smaller towns who have 
to supply farm implements and other 
hardware lines to the new settlers." 



The assets of the business o( I'lric 
Boucher, general merchant, St. Barnabc, 

are advertised to be sold the 3rd inst, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOREST CITY GOSSIP. 

■i.l Metal," , 
London, Out.. Julj -'. L903. 

Till- retail trade here continues an. a/ 
ood : and no lull has 3 el 
in, although this is usually i h<- 
date when the Blacking off l>.'u"i««^ - anil 
employers an<l employed take a breathing 
spell, and a few holidays to recuperate 
them for another year. Hut " busini 
business," said a hardware merchant 1ms 
tliiiLj around the counters, to two friends 
who had called inviting him to an out- 
ing in tin' country— "business is business 
with ns hardware chaps. .hist now I've 
Lrot to keep my coat off, and you law 

\ill have to go off this year with 
out me : fact ! we're really too busy to 
leave our business at present." Holi- 

will apparently have to be postpon- 
ed 1>\ hardwaremen both in the retail and 
wholesale branches, ns the demand upon 
the wholesale houses also continues for 
nearly every line. Price lists are un- 
changed. 

• • • 

Barbed wire, galvanized and coiled 
spring wires halve had an unusually heavy 

11 : in no former year have the sales 
been so large in Western Ontario. This 
is considered undoubted evidence of the 
improving condition of Canada's agricul- 
turists. In the good times, and money 
easy, amongst the first duties attended 
to is the renewing and repairing of the 
fences on the farm ; and the days he- 
tween Beeding and haying', haying and 
harvest, and during opportune and favor- 
able winter days, many coils of fence 
wire arc used in keepiner the place in 
order. A well kept farm of the present 
day has discarded its cedar snake fence 
and only the latest wire fence surrounds 

the property. 

# » * 

\n agreement was made four years 
ago between the largest of the manufac- 
turers of implements, that they should 
not exhibit anything at any fair for five 
this coming fall was included in 
the agreement, but the London Western 
Pair people have hopes of the combine 
being forced to abandon their position. 
J. \ Nelles, secretary of the Western 
Fair, ha- received an entry from The -J. 
one of the largest manu 
facturei - in the United State- ; i h e j 
will exhibit here on a large scale, and 
the competition, it is hoped, will bring 

the combine to the same com 

* # » 

Trouble is anticipated at the engine 
and boiler works of ]■; Leonard >V, - 
The machinists claim they were promised 
an advance in -alary which they have not 

received. 

• • • 

\ipoiit 17.") \i-itoi- (35 of whom will 

lie ladies) to the Fifth Annual 

of the Cba ,| Commerce of the Brit- 



5,000,000 Iyer Johnson Revolvers 



Have been made, sold and used, 



Resulting 
in 



Reputation, 

Profit, 

and Satisfaction 



to 




Maker, Dealer and User. 

ict a name tha 

is everywhere recognized 

upon application. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 

FITCHBURG, MASS. 



LinKing to the product a name that 



A Guarantee of Excellence. cuio B «e m..ied !«« 



Naw York Office : 99 Chambers St. 



ish Empire, which meets in Montreal this 
summer, are expected to visit London on 
the tour they will be given through Can 

ada. 

* » * 

The Board of Trade representatives of 
the Western Fair are : John Bowman, 
of The J. Bowman Hardware Co. ; J. 
W. Little, of Robinson, Little & Co. ; A. 
B. Greer; James Mattinson; W. •! . 

Reid and Isaac Waterman. 

* * » 

'Phe results of the examinations of the 
Institute of Chartered Accountants of 
Ontario have just been announced. 
Among- the successful London candidates 
are the following : Intermediate : Messrs. 
H. C. Screaton, W. C. Benson, A. P. 
Falls, W. R. Jex, J. D. Omond, and E. 

Adkins. 

* * * 

Hardwaremen interested in a good game 
of baseball will not be averse to learn 
that this is a great town for this favor- 
ite sport ; the wholesale league and the 
big factories put up greai g - ames. Last 
Saturday McClary's factorymen suffered 
defeat at the hands of the St. John's, 

al-o of this city. 

* • # 

Conductor Parker, of the G.T.R., who 
resides in this city, ha- gone to Sural" 
ga where he will attend a convention of 
the Waste! Car Builders of America this 
week. The conductor has patented a 
device to prevent the steam pipes in pas 
i cars from freezing, anil he will 
exhibit it at the convention. The in 
vention is said to be one of the best yet 
brought to the attention of the railway 
companies, and it is understood that a 
number of roads, including the Grand 
Trunk, are about to adopt it. 
12 



The McOlary Co. will start fifty men 
to work at their new foundry this week. 
The task of transferring the scene of op- 
erations from the old to the new plant 
is of necessity somewhat slow. The first 
run of iron was made at the new works 
on Friday. Some of the men demurred 
against beginning on Friday, but the 
management had no superstitions in the 

matter. 

* # * 

The men employed at the new brick- 
yard of the Builders' Supply Association 
quit work in a body to-day. The trouble 
arose over the appointment of a new 
manager, the former manager having 
proved inefficient. Under the circum 
stances the company feel that the action 
of the men is very unjust, and are deter 
mined not to give way to their demands. 
No difficulty is anticipated in filling their 
places, and it is thought the works will 
not be shut down longer than a day or 

two. 

# # # 

The coal scare of last winter, hen 
elsewhere, is inducing many to fill their 
bins before there is any possibility of a 
shortage when cold weather is on US. 
\o dealers will take any order for fill in. 
deb\;i\ 111' i ice is %1 cash down pel 

ton. Those who buy later mav have (o 
meet the III per cent, advance in Wages 
which was granted the miners. Tim fai 
this advance has not reached London. 

W.II.L. 



Gaults, Ltd.. Winnipeg, have been in- 
corporated with $750,000 capital, to do 
a wholesale a nd retail general dry troods 
business, with power to manufacture any 
lines desired. The directors are II. M. 
belcher, l ; . G. Crawford, J. D. brown aid 

I. Pitblado, Winnipeg, and .lame- Rodger, 
\\ innipeg . 



7 



n~ 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



W. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 



ARVEST TOOLS. 



LIMITED 
ONLY 
WHOLESALE 







5 

(I *-Tlne Hay FArks, straight and bent ban 




Scythes, narrow and wide heel, 



JUL 1 

3-Tina Hay Forks. 



^r ! 



Straight and bent handles. 



JUL W 





B£Ti 



•1 *•" 5 *5r 

Hay Rakes. 

Straight and Bent Handles, Wood and Iron Bows 




Grain Cradles. 




Scythe Stones. 



Straw Forks, 

Throe and Four Tine. 



Snaths, 

Ring, Loop and Bolt, 

Bfl lug socket. 




Barley Forks, with and without Guard 



FOR A FULLER LINE OF HARVEST TOOLS. SEE OUR HARDWARE CATALOGUE. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. u-rrao. Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT. 



Graham IMails ara the Best. 

Factory : DufTsrln Street, Toronto 
13 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



Hardware and 



MACHINERY 




Kay Electric Dvnamo and Motor Co., Limited 

M . M it nil pur- 

.iin.-t and alternating ourrentt. Bpeoial 
pairs. 

19 --J1 Queen - into 

Phone Main 1251 Estimates . h. . rfvilly given 



'THE PEERLESS" 



is the bjst Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. Write Us for Prices 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 




WE STRAP THE WORLD! 



HADE IN FOTJB WIDTHS. 

'..inch. ', inch. .'., inch and 1 inch. 
PATENTED IN ALL COUNTRIES. 



Cary's Universal Box Strap 

A CONTINUOUS Metal Strap with a series of raised bosses along the edges, to 
strengthen same and protect nail heads. Put up in coils of 300 feet each, and 
packed 20 coils in a case. On each coil we put our patent metal reel frame, making 
it a complete reel. 

E. F. DARTNELL, 180 St. James St. 



MONTREAL 
HEADQUARTERS : 



BELL TELEPHONE MAIN No. 2382. 



TRUCKS 



FOR 



Warehouse, Railroad 
and Hotel Use : : 

Furnished with Rubber Tires It desired. 




>^UILT TO STAND HARD USAGE. \&Jj 





WE CARRY A COMPLETE STOCK OF ALL STYLES AND SIZES. 

SEND FOR OUR TRUCK CATALOGUE 

fHE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



I I 



VANCOUVER 



Hardware tnd 

M.t-1 




THE LARQE CEMENT WORKS AT 
HULL. 



T 



UK construction of the works of 
The International Portland Cement 

Co.. in Hull. Que., arc now well 
under way. Concrete foundations are in 

course of construction for the following 
buildings,- large rotary building, clinker 
grinding building, warehouse, clay stor 
age, machine shop, clinker storage and 
coal storage buildings ; also concrete 
foundations for clinker bed, conveyor 
tunnel, column piers, hall mills, tube 
mills, ball and tube mill foundations for 
clinker grinding, clay storage, and con 
Crete walls between rotary building and 
dry grinding building. The plant will 
qpver sis acres, and. over 600 carloads of 
machinery and materials will be needed 
for its construction. For the past four 
or live months the engineers have been 
engaged at the Toronto office in making 
detailed drawings of the entire plant, in- 
cluding all the machinery to be installed. 
Even the structural steel that enters into 
the building is of special design. The 
machinery has been ordered, and is now 
under course of construction by the var 
ions i nan ufiac, tourers located in Canada. 
the United States and Germany. 

THE NEW POWER WORKS AT 
NIAGARA. 

THE following information re the 
power development work at 
Niagara Kails, is furnished " Hard- 
ware and Metal" by (). (1. Parry, one of 
the practical engineers in charge of the 
work : " The Canadian Niagara Power 
Co., controlled by the same capital as 

The Niagara Falls Power Co.. is building 
a great wheel pit, which is to be connect- 
ed to the lower river by means of a tun 
nel tailrace. This wheel pit is eventual- 
ly to be 180 feet lone, but at present a 

section "ilifi feet long i- being built. The 

width is -Jl feet and the depth 170 feet. 

A long forebav is being built in front of 
this wheel pit : it will have tile same 
length and a width of 100 feet except 
where it passes under the track of The 
Niagara Falls Park & River Ry. From 
the north end of the wheel pit a canal 
lli feet wide and 500 feet long will be 
built to the ii\er to be used as an ice 
run, thi' How being regulated bv gates. 

"A tunnel -J.-Jl"! feet lone, -Jo feet high 
and 1^ feet wide inside the lining at the 
spring line will connect the wheel pit 



with the lower river. The portal of this 
tunnel is located close up to the Horse 
shoe Falls, the stream discharging close 
at it- base. 

"The unit of development will be L0, 
nun horse power. This will be generated 
at a voltage of 12,000 three phase 25 cy 

dies, the generator to make J.")ll revolu- 
tions per minute 

"It is well known that Toronto is ex- 
pecting to profit by this development. 
For transmission to that distance a po- 
tential will be used of 1,000 to 6, 

volts. 

A POWERFUL STEAM DYNAMO. 

U. S. Consul-General R. Guenther, 
Frankfort, Germany, reports that the 

rapid development of electric central 
stations in Germany has resulted in the 
construction of powerful dynamos. The 
Khenish Westphalian Electricity Works at 
Essen has ordered from The Brown 
Bovert Company at Mannheim a steam 
turbine to furnish power for a dynamo 
of 5,iiiiii volts and one of 1,600 volts. 
These two electrical machines will require 
about 10,000 horse power. The whole ap- 
paratus occupies a space less than nine 
feet in height and width and about 60 
feet in length. The 10,000-h.p. turbine 
has a length of only about 2\ feet. 

STEAM PLOUGHS FOR FARMING 

A western correspondent writes : "The 
tendency to increase the size of the farms 
in eastern Assiniboia has made the rpies 
tion of the economy of steam ploughs of 
interest to the farmers. Half a do/en 
traction engines are in use on as many 
farms hauling ploughs which turn over 
live furrows. The plough is guided by a. 
team, ami another team is used to haul 
water and coal for the engine. Although 
coal costs the farmer $5 a ton laid down 
at his farm, the saving on the use of 
steam is estimated at "ill per cent. A 
set of the heavy English ploughs, brought 
out to Canada for use on one of the great 
farms which failed miserably at Qu'Ap 
pelle. has been purchased by a Moose 

daw man. a nd is being operated effective 
ly. With this plough two engines are 
used, one being stationed at each end of 
a half mile furrow. ('aides winding about 
drums on the engine draw the five 
ploughs which are firmly set in a frame. 
The frame also controls a pulverizer and 
harrow-, and the -oil needs little further 
15 



treatment after this machine ha- pa ed 

through it. When a furrow is In, 

the engines move ahead, and the ph. 

work back to the othei end of the held 
The advantage claimed for this cla 
engines i- that the team required by a 

traction engine to move it- own Wl 

"I. and that only one of the two 

English engines are using -team at one 

lime, so that there i- n,,t aB great a 
Consumption of fuel a- would be expect 
ed." 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES. 

THE Brown & Wigle Co. have just had 
installed in the woollen mills here a 
90 horse-power Corliss engine, made 
by Goldie & McCulloch, Gait. It is the 
finest engine in town and runs verv 
smoothly. From present calculations it 
will make nearly $1,000 a year of a saving 
in their fuel bills— Kingsville, Ont., Re- 
porter. 

B. Chubb, Son & Phillips, Saskatoon, 
N-W.T , are establishing a modern brick- 
making plant. Machinery is to arrive this 
week, and operations started as soon as the 
plant can be installed. 

Dr. S. J. Rickes, president of the Guelph 
River Valley Electric Road, has made a 
proposition to Guelph to extend the road- 
to give connection with Puslinch Lake and 
Hespeler, Ont. 

A large saw mill is to be completed at 
Norwood, Ont., this summer. It is to give 
employment to 300 men, and to have a 
capacity for 25,000,000 feet of logs per 
annum. The most modern machinery 
will be installed. 

The Canada Wood Mfg. Co., Farnham, 
Que., are making extensive alterations to 
their property to instal a modern furn- 
iture plant. A saw mill, boiler room, 
machinery rooms, etc., will be fitted up. 
The first instalment of machinery has 
arrived. 

William Pickles, New Glasgow, N.S., 
chief electrical engineer of The Nova Scotia 
Steel and Coal Co., is in North Sydney, 
N.S., installing the company's new lighting 
plant. The ore pier is now being wired. 
The company has commenced operations 
at Wabana with a force of 500 men, and 
will shortly be able to ship their ore to 
North Sydney. A steamer with loading 
towers and other appliances for the ore 
pier is now en route to North Sydney. 

The Portland Rolling Mills, St. John, 
N.B., are going to branch out into the 



r1*r<lw*r<- and 

Mct.l 



MACHINERY 



of nuts and 1 >l«) t -- . 

of the mills, i- now 
i . in Connecticut lot 
department, 
on, l)nt a by la* 

he electric light plant. 
.1. W. James bas installed u steam 
> > iv - . Orillia. 
_.ni Tanning Co., I'ictou, \ S . 
.-tall a new boiler plant. 

The engineers of The Manitoba Cement 
Ltd., Winnipeg, have left for Bforden, 
Man., to Btart operations at onoe. 

\ complete laundry outlit is being 
. bj 11. W. Petrie, Toronto, at 
Falls, Out., for the Loretto 
\. ademy. 

I». II. Williams. Saskatoon, N.W.T., has 
secured the position a> travelling agent 
I be American Abell Machine Co., 
Kegina, N.W.T. 

The work of installing the machinery 
in the new works of The Dominion 
Wrought Iron Wheel Co., Orillia, Out., is 
nearlj completed. 

Marsh & Henthorn, Belleville, have add- 
ed to their plant a 16 in.\G -ft. Porter 
lathe. This machine was furnished by 
II. \\ . Petrie, Toronto. 

A Barnes water emery grinder with a 
24x2-in. wheel was purchased by The 
American Abell Engine Co., Toronto, 
from II. W. Petrie, Toronto. 

John, N.B., council have under con- 
sideration the establishment of a munici- 
pal telephone system. Aid. Macrae has 

• ■'•II appointed to secure estimates. 

\t a meeting of the shareholders of The 
Canadian Liubber Co., Montreal, held on 
June '!'■'>, it was decided to remodel the 

• •nine plant of the company and put in 
new machinery. 

liter .y. l.yall, of The Standard Ma- 
chine Works, Winnipeg, have removed 
their plant to the new shops of The 
Manitoba Iron Works, Ltd., Winnipeg. 

Then ime talk of establishing a 

foundry in Berlin, Out. 

iron molders employed in The 

Rheaumu Foundrj at Mile End, Dear 

Montreal, are out on strike because the 

firm refused to sign the new scale of 

which was recently adopted by 

Iron Molders' Union. 

The K K. T. Pringle Co., Montreal, 

through their branch in St. John, N. 

15., h ired the contract to supply 

I'-am lnp Beatrice Waring with hei 

electric lighting plant in which will be 

included a Bearch light. The engine to 

be Used will be a Leonard automatic. 

It i- believed that The Quebec Railway, 
Light iV. Power Co., and The Quebec, 
' kai i iei l.le. i rii Co hav< come 
i . i iiinler- tanding preliinina 
their ronHolidation. Both comp 



have sent notices to their customers that 
ra will be placed in all houses and 
charges will be according to electricity 
consumed. 

One of the celebrated "Taber" pumps, 
lor which 11. W . Petrie] Toronto, is the 
Canadian agent, has been installed in the 
plant of The Milton Creamery Co.. Tor- 
onto. I 'hese pumps are especially de- 
signed for creameries, tanneries, glue 
factories, sugar refineries, breweries and 
wherever special liquids are to be elevat- 

Frederickton, N. B., is going to install an 
electric plant to cost about $1S,000, for the 
operation of her street lights. 

The annual report of the Canadian Elec- 
tric Company, Quebec, was presented to 
the shareholders at a general meeting held 
on June 23. There has been 62 per cent 
increase in the number of electric lights 
operated by the company. A year ago 
they supplied 72 electric horse power ; this 
yearthe3' supph'276, an increase of 362 per 
cent. The reports showed an increase o 
$15,915 in this year's earnings. Altogether 
it was a very satisfactory report. 

The Western Fuel Co., Victoria, B. C, 
has in contemplation the inauguration of 
a number of improved methods in handling 
the coal output. The pit head and hoisting 
engines will be of the usual kind, but the 
method of loading ships will be new. Large 
bunkers will be constructed, which will be 
filled directly off the screens by an endless 
conveyor. Another conveyor will be run 
direct from the screens to the wharf. 

The marriage of G. R Duncan, M.Sc, 
superintendent and electrician of The Mont- 



real Pipe Foundry, to Miss Florence Bene- 
dict, took place in Ottawa recently. 



BOOTH'S VACUUM PAN AND PUMP 

THE Booth Copper Co., 119-123 Queen 
Street, East, Toronto, are the makers 
of the copper vacuum pan, a cut of 
which appears below. These pans are 
made in sizes from 30 inches to 12 feet in 
diameter, suitable for cofectioners, brewers, 
chemical laboratories and for that large 
class of manufacturers, who are coming to 
realize the saving in fuel ^and the products 
to be derived from evaporating at a low 
temperature. The pan shown in the cut is 
provided with a double bottom, and also 
with a steam coil in the interior. Steam is 
applied in both places and the vapor passes 
over to the right through a catch-all which 
turns back any liquor which may pass over 
with the vapor. From the catch-all it 
passes on to the second receptacle noted in 
the cut, the condensor. Here the vapor is 
met and condensed by a spray of water 
The pump in the lower right hand corner 
carries off this water and so creates the 
vacuum. Liquors in these pans will 
evaporate at one half the temperature 
required under ordinary air pressure, and 
may be reduced without danger of scotch- 
ing. 

The pans are finished in a handsome and 
workman-like manner, and a large 7 foot 
one now being erected in the works for the 
Huntingdon, Que., Condensed Milk factory, 
presents an imposing appearance. Further 
information regarding the vacuum pan can 
be had on enquiry of the Booth Copper 
Company. 




MACHINER\ 



H. 



■ ■ anrl 
M.i.,1 




SY&/ 



The Broadest < lurrlculum ■■) Studies The Bigheil Standard 

nf KxiM'lliMii-c Tin' lifHi Practical Reaulta, 
Malcolm MacCormick, B A.., Principal, Gitelph, Ohx 

THE "SUN" BRAND PORTLAHO CEMENT. 

\\ e make oily one quality and thai the in'Ht. 
Ask us for quotations. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 

.1 vs A clink, Managing Director. 

PETRIE'S MACHINERY BARGAINS 

(Gorreoted Weekly.) 
HKill SPEED ENGINES. 

11 \ in [deal, Goldie 8 McCulloch Make. 

in \ in Peerless, Leonard. 

ll \ hi 

IS \ 34 Wheelock. 

8 to 66 H. I' Jewel Engines, always in stock. 
WOOD WORKING TOOLS 

Nos, 1,2 and 3 Wood Top Rip Saw Tables, American 

maice, oew. 

No 2 Sell Peed Rip Saw Table, Defiance, N. ■« 

No. 1 Variety Saw Table, Clement, New. 

Champion Cut Off Saw Table. NVu 

26 in Pedestal Band Saws, Silver, New 

32 in. " ' 

3(i in. Amerioan. 

Single Spindle Prizzer, Berlin, New. 

20 in. Combined Disk anil Drum Sander, New. 

U in. Major Harper Planer and Matcher. 

LM in. Endless Bel Surface!', Merlin, New. 

24 in. Heavy Planer and Smoother, Berlin, New. 
HOISTING ENGINES. 

6J \ S Double Cylinder, Single Drum, New. 

6 \ S Double Cylinder Double Drum, New 
Send for prices and catalogue of factory supplies, 

H. W. PETRIE 

131-145 Front St. West. 8-22 Station St., Toronto. 




BUY 

KERR 
VALVES. 

They give 
satisfaction 
every time, 



Catalogue 
on application. 



TheKerr Engine Go. 



Walkervllle, Ont, 




Blacksmiths' 




ROY DODSONS PATENT HAMECHAINS. 



No matter where your lot is cist 
we i an improve the lot. 

Metal Stampings 

are Stronger, Lighter, Cheaper 
than Castings. 



We work Sheet Steel, Brass, 
Aluminum and Copper to any 
shape. 

Send us your samples and num- 
ber required, and we will quote 
prices on same 

STAMPED IN RELIEF. 



Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co., 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 



Limited 



USE 



CANADIAN BABBIT 



Imperial 
IVIe-tallic 



Hercules 

Star 



Drills. 

The very 
best. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 
HESPELER, ONT. 



The highest grade babbits made. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., "."i-IV TORONTO. 

COLD PRESSED NUTS 



of all shapes and sizes, finished, semi- 
finished, case hardened, plated or 
polished. 



Canada Foundry Company, Limited, 

14-16 King Street East, - - TORONTO. 





CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. ^r^?^?" **"""" 



M m • .1 v 
MoUl 



DEPARTMENT OF ADVERTISING 
SUGGESTION AND CRITISISM 



\, 1 1 1 li.T. in are .lis* nsml i In- principle! mill pi » o Uo e "f ii.lviri isinK subscribers am invited t" mM Mr. Lydiatt naohnsni 
ther ulTertmng, fur tin- pnrpOM "t review in this department Address care of Department of Advcrtis- 

l:l>\t AM AM' MtTAI.. 




Edited by 

W. Arthur 
Lydiatt, 



You Watch Your Business Only Half Way When You Fail to 

Watch tHe Advertising. 



IM I M. Shildrick, of Paris, Out., 
"* I has.- received a couple of a. Is. 
which show traces of an endeavor to 
do some good advertising, but they do 
n, .t come quit.' up to the mark. How- 
ever, as Mr. Shildrick states in the ac- 
companying letter, "I'm new at the ad- 
vertising work." wo can make allowances 
fur any shortcomings in the ads he has 
submitted. 
Here's his letter : 

Paris, Ont., May 13th. 1903. 
\v. Arthur Lydiatt, eso., Toronto, om. 

Dear Sir.— Should be pleased to get sugges- 
tions as to advertising goods saleable at this 
season, viz., lawn mowers, refrigerators, etc. 

Enclosed find a couple of proofs for this 
week's local papers. Should be pleased if you 
would comment on these, as I am new at the 
advertising work. Yours truly, 

E. M. Shildrick. 

1 reproduce one of the ads herewith. 
By way of comment 1 would suggest that 



FLY TIME ! ! 

and 
HIGH TIME 

you wen replacing your old worn-out screen doors and 
Window! with new ones that will keep the Hies out 
31 IM! 

We nave a size to fit your doors or windows at a price 
that will tit your pocket. 

(Cost) 
. all the standard sizes, or make screens to 
onler. Strong oak frames covered with extra weight, 
woven wire. Will not rust or bust 
BEETLE & BUZZER, 

Annoyance, Ont. 



he should try not to lie prosy. Take 
this ad for instance: I don't fancy Mr. 
Shildrick would approach me with "Be 
hold tin Festive Fly. The pesky nuisan- 
_ain lure, etc.," if 1 should hap- 
|x-n into his store and be looking at his 
D doors and windows. 
"We've got 'em at all prices" betrays 
an effort to be smart, which is not at 
all uncommon in ordinary advertising. 
Wouldn't it he betl ay "All sizes 

at all price-," if nothing better raj 
ed itself. 
I think in advertising screens it would 
• to "ay something about the last- 
• >f the kind you have. 



Some screens rust easily and then break 
full of holes. Do yours ? Do you guar- 

l-ANA/IM tVIONA/EIFtsI 



Lh 



Almost any lawn mower will run easily 
ami out cleanly when it's new that's not 
the test. 

Its the way the mower runs and cuts 
after it has been used a season that dis- 
tinguishes a good mower from a poor one. 

You expect a lawn mower to last mort* 
than one summer ? 



— , backed by our 



Then get a — 
gUM ;uitee and the makers 

Prices range from & to $ , so you'll 

surely find one to suit both your needs ami 
pocket in the assortment we'll show you if 
you 11 just step into the store— any con- 
venient time. 



CUTTER, GRASS & CO., Mower, Man 



E3 



antee them against this ? Some makers 
of screens do, and if you do, it might be 
a good idea to offer to replace any, or 
re-paint any, which rusted or otherwise 
deteriorated to any extent inside of a 
year from purchase. 

I would then give a list of sizes and 
prices carried in stock, and if you make 
odd sizes to order, say so. 

I would suggest that Mr. Shildrick 
have his address more definitely stated in 



S HI LD RICK'S HMD WARS, »««.,•. ou 1 

—Behold The Festive Fly 1- 



Tbe peek? nuisances are. again here and It behooves as u 
(rood JtonMleeners to keep 'em ont. Screen doors and win- 
dows are really so cbeAp that there's no exco.se for one's boose 
being filled with tbe pests. 




Screen D»rs, 85c aud upwards, eoMplste wltb binges, ete. 
Screen Windows, 20c sod opwa/da. 



Come, In and let ns show you the latest wrinkle In Oil Storm. 
Tbe •• Qalek.Heal ■ Bine Flame Wicktese Coal Oil Stare 
Is a top notcber. 



SHIIORICK'S HARDWARE, 



18 



the ad. Possibly it doesn't make so 
very much difference — it may be that 
every one in Paris knows where "Buck- 
ley's Old Stand" is — but I think it just 
as well to have the details of the loca- 
tion in every ad as plainly as possible. 
I'd have the name set in a little larger 
type, and the street and number stated. 
Wouldn't do any harm to insert "Paris, 
Ont.," too. 

Regarding the suggestion for advertis- 
ing refrigerators, lawn mowers and other 
seasonable goods, I gave a refrigerator 
ad last week, but offer a suggestion here- 
with for an ad about lawn mowers and 
others about gas stoves and screens 
which I hope some other readers will also 
find of use. 

Although I have, on several occasions, 
given suggestions for ads, and at the 
same time made request that if any read- 
er used them I would like to know it, 



IT'S HOT 
ENOUGH IN 
SUMMER 

without adding the distressing heat of a coal cook 
stove. 



The new Gas Ranges we are showing 

are better cookers and much more economical than 
any coal or wood stove that was ever made, and 
certainly much more convenient and comfortable. 

Not expensive to buy or to operate. 

Always ready for use— cook a meal in a few 
minutes. 

Prices range from .« to .•$ . 

Come and look at them— neednt purchase unless 
you decide you need one. 

BAKER & OVENS, Gaston, ttue 



and receive a copy of the ad as used, I 
have not been so favored, though I hap- 
pen to know that a few readers used 
some of them. 

Ungrateful, surely. 



B*tkJ,»'. 014 fttaa*. 



LIGHT WEIGHT SPOOL WIRE. 

The Malin Company, Cleveland, 0., have 
issued a circular warning the trade 
against spool wire light weights. Some 
makers, they state, are selling £ lb. 
spools which only contain 3 oz. of wire, 
the other 1 oz. being the weight of the 
spool, whereas the proper weight of a 
spool should be 5 oz., thus giving \ OZ. 
of wire net. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES. BOOKLETS, ETC 

GUN CTALOGUS. 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co.'s blue book 
on guns and ammunition is just put, and 
retailers who did not receive a copy of it 
should by all means make application to 
the company for one. The catalogue is 
one of 80 pages, fully illustrated with cuts 
of the various guns, revolvers, cartridges, 
etc. It contains accurate descriptions ol 
the articles and the list of prices. The 
first describes the single and double guns 
of American and foreign makes. Win- 
chester a(ld Marlin rifles follow, and then 
Stevens' and Iver Johnson's goods. Re- 
volvers, cartridges, loaded shells and sun- 
dries of all kinds occupy the latter part of 
the catalogue. Most of the prices given 
are subject to a liberal discount. A dis- 
count sheet will be furnished on applica- 
tion. 

" NEVER RUST " COMPOUND. 

Geo. Borgfeldt Co., Toronto, are offer- 
ing a superior slushing compound called 
" Never Rust," which is made in six 
grades to meet the requirements of all 
lines of steel. This slushing compound is 
used by a very large number of the most 
prominent manufacturers in the United 
States and by the United States Navy. 
One of the claims made for it is that it 
covers twice the surface possible with 
common slushes, and on this account is 
very economical. 



CORUNDUM POPULAR. 

The Canada Corundum Co. expects to 
have completed in September its new 
plant, located at Craigmont, Renfrew 
County, Ont. The new works will have 
an annual capacity of over 6,000 tons of 
commercial corundum. This plant, inci- 
dentally, will be the largest concentrating 
plant in Canada. Until the new works 
are ready The Canada Corundum Co. are 
experiencing a good deal of embarrass- 
ment in meeting the demand for their 
abrasive. 

A TREE PROTECTOR. 

The Tree Preservative Co., of 84 Wel- 
lington West, Toronto, have a device — 
an expanding collar filled with felt, which 
is meeting with approval from fruit men 
everywhere. The collar enlarges with 
the tree's growth, and conforms to the 
irregularities of the tree-trunk. The lining 
of felt is treated with poison, and tree 
vermin are effectually prevented from 
getting beyond the collar. The device 
next year will, doubtless, be handled by 
hardware dealers ; it is being introduced, 
in the meantime, to the consumers through 
agents. 



Sluw Cutter. 



Corn Cm!,' 



W*Wl»KTCO 



A 




■ l'nl ipplied for 



J. I. MAST MFG. CO., Liz, Pa 

Edwin H. Grenfell & Co., London, Ont., 

CANADIAN AQENTS. 




.Sr^orfo Atip s0n.£ 
1"H A fieri amp 

•DO YOU*? 

tufvetusemen t 
4» in the «r» 

To^od-To 

will bring you, 
VkT" 1 tendxrsfrem thi 

^" J dtsl contractors 



Any man in the Hardware Trade selling Silverware 
cannot afford to place his Fall Order without first seeing our new 
samples. New designs and up-to-date goods, Quality 
guaranteed. 

WRITE US F OR CATALOGUE. 

E. W. GILMORE & BRO., 



Importers of Silverware. 



6b BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.. 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS. 



SOLD BY AL L HARDWARE 
DEALERS. 



AMERICAN, or Flat LlnK ! 



NIAGARA. WIRE LINK 




SMOOTH AND EASY 

19 



STRONGEST TIE MADE 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




'p UK Ulain. Johnston Ob . Ltd., lor 
onto, have l><vn incorporated with 
"' capital, to carry on die 
business of The Blain, Johnston Co., 
manufacturers of and deal 
ages, etc., and t<> <!<• a gen 
era] blacksiuithing business l"l i<- direct 
. I> M Johnston, W. s. Plews and 
I \. M, Arthur. 

Guelph, Out. has passed a by-law to 
purchase the > t di-U of The Guelph Street 
Railwaj Co. 

Mackenzie, of The Canadian Nor- 
thern, saya thai construction work is 
proceeding rapidly westward from Er 
wood and Grand View, Man. A large 
track laying machine is included in the 
construction equipment. 

I II. Clergue insists that the railway 
- Slanitoulin Island, proposed some 
time ago, will be built despite rumors to 
the effect that it would | 1( . abandoned as 
a i. -nit of the decision to build a line 
from Sudbury to Scotia Junction. The 
lines, he states, will be built sirnul 

tan isly. He claims that Toronto will 

have direct connection with the -Soo" 
by his railway system within two years. 
Winnipeg Electric Street Railway is 
building a line to Silver Heights, a short 
Instance beyond the city limits. 
i 1 he C.P.R. is actively engaged in ex- 
tending its sidings all along the line in 
Manitoba. 

The Ontario West Shore Electric Kail 

waj Co. is showinu sio-ns () f activity. 
Aid has been promised by several mntnici 
palities on th,. projected route of the 
road from Owen Sound to Sarnia, a 
thickl} populated and beautiful section 
of Ontario. 

Although th.- machinery has not been 
completely installed in the new wurl. 
The Dominion Wrought Iron Wheel Co., 
Orillia, th.- company, owing to orders be- 
■ pressing, have commenced burning 
out wheels 

The lap,- Bret,,,, Coal, Iron ami Hail 

way Co., will proceed at once with the 

development of then area- which com- 

67 square miles, situated near 

Sydm 

'I he National Poi tland Cement Co., Dur 
ham, dm , i- shipping large quantities 
ol cement through the port of Owen 

Sound foi the West. 

It i- reported that some \,. w York 
capitalists will -tart lead smelting works 
at Kingston, Ont 

1 '•>■>■■ < i intend, n t M< •( luigan, of 

the prop -id Trunk Pacific, says 



that should that line he built the com 

pan} will expend probablj 91,500,000 in 
the enlarging and improving of the ce 

pair and construction shop at Sitrntford, 
Ont. ; that those shops will be made the 
chief centre of repair and also for the 
construction of new engines and cars. 

W. II. Storey & Son. Ltd. Acton, Ont., 
have been incorporated with a capital of 
,i.i. i ii H i. to tan leather and deal in 
hides and skins and to manufacture and 
deal in gloves, mocassins and other 
leathei goods ; directors W. A. Storey, 
A. E. Nicklin, II. P. .Moore, \cto„ ; \\. 
J. Chapman, Wingham ; D. D. Christie, 
Guelph ; and John flirstbrook, Toronto. 

Geo. K. Bryan, Winnipeg, is adding to 
his building on Market street and will 
install a plant for the manufacture of 
brooms and whisks. Charles Hamill. 

Superintendent of the factory, is now buy 
me the plant. 

According to 'The Advance, The Bailie, 
(Out.,) Carriage Co. will employ from 
sixty to one hundred hands. 

The Dominion Coal Co. propose to 
open another pit in order to meet the in- 
creased demand for Cape Breton coal. 
The location of the pit will probably be 
at Victoria, N.S. 

A despatch from Sydney Mines, N.S. 
says that eighty more coke ovens are to 
be constructed by The Nova Scotia Steel 
and Coal Co. at that place. 

Hose & McCrae have received the eon 
tract for the construction of a section of 
the G.T.R. double tracking between Sar- 
nia Tunnel and Hamilton. 

The Wylie Milling Co., Ltd., Almonte, 
Ont., have been incorporated with a 
capital of 840,000, to manufacture and 
deal in Hour and cereals. 'The directors 
are: J. H. Wylie, W. H. Wylie, .1. B. 
Wylie, and A. C. Wylie, Almonte. 

'The Westport Milling Co., Ltd., West 
port, Ont., have been incorporated with 
a capital of $4(1.110(1, to divide into shares 
..I $25 each, to manufacture anil deal in 
flour and meal; directors, J. McCowen 
Stoness, A. W. (bay, O. B. Berry, 
Westport. 

The Conn 'Telephone Co., Ltd., Conn, 
Ont., have been incorporated with a 
$1,50(1 capital, lo lain on the general 
business of a telephone company in the 
townships of Arthur, West Luther, Wei 
lington County"; Proton, Grey County; 
and East Luther, Dulierin County, 'The 
directors are : A. H. Berry, G. W. Bur 
row-. Conn; 'Thomas Begley, Proton 

20 



tp.; M. Jlniiion, Augustus Howes, 

West Luther tp. 

'Tlie Northern Trading Co., Ltd.. Port 
Arthur, have been incorporated with a 
capital of $'25,000, to carry on the busi 
ii.-s of a coast trading companj ; di 
rectors, .1. .). O'Connor, (I. W. Dixon. 
G. F. Whalen. A. .1. McComber, W. \ 
Leys, Port Arthur. 
The Western Leather Goods Co.; Ltd., 

'Toronto, have I n incorporated with a 

s|n, (Mid capital, to manufacture and sell 
sporting, fancy and other leather and 
canvas goods; directors, \\ . E. D. 

Tighe and 1). S. McLaren, 'Toronto, and 
W. H. Ketclmin. New York. 

The Wakefield Mica Co.. Ltd., Ottawa. 
have been incorporated with a capital of 
150,000, to carry on mining, milling and 
reducing operations and to acquire the 
business of 'The Wakefield Mica Company. 
Ottawa; directors, 0. K. D. Chubbuck, 
k. B. Holland, C. A. Johnston, jr.. Otta 
wa ; H. M. .Johnson, T. H. Kennedy, 
'Toronto. 

Hon. R. Prefontaine, Minister of Mar 
ine, is taking steps to light the channel 
between Montreal ■ and Quebec so that 
steamships may travel without interrup- 
tion at night as well as day. The plan 
to be adopted is that of gas lighted 
buoys, which will be of the latest pat 
tern. Jt is thought that the work will 
In- completed before the end of summer. 

New steam pumps are to be installed in 
connection with London's water works 
system in place of the old hydraulic 
pumps. The new pumps will cost $20,- 
000. Superintendent Moore, of the 
water-works, says that they will effect a 
saving of thousands of dollars a year in 
full. The capacity of the new pumps will 
be 5,000 gallons a day, whereas the old 
ones had a capacity of only 2.000 gal 
Ions a day. 

'The Toronto & Niagara Power Com- 
pany. Niagara Falls, N.Y., are calling 
for tenders to construct what will be the 
largest power wheel pit in the world. It 
is to be 480 feet long, 180 feet deep and 
27 feet wide, ami will be cut through the 
solid rock. There will be 225,000 horse 
power developed in this pit, which will 
est about $1,250,000. 



NO HALF -HOLIDAY FOR "TWIN 
CITY." 

At the regular monthly meeting of the 
"'Twin City" Retail Merchants' Associa 
tiou, held in Waterloo on June 15. the 
question of having a weekly half-holiday 
was discussed. It was decided to circu- 
late a petition among the merchants, and 
have the matter reported at a special 
meeting to be held in a week's time. The 
special meeting was held, and the report 
submitted, which showed that the major 
its not in favor of the half holiday was 
(en. 'Therefore the matter was dropped. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



to 



JOHN MILLEN & SONS 



V 



MONTREAL & TORONTO 



Y PYC Special 

J\J*-o I o*<3 Midsummer Offer 

No. J Assortment, 3 Gross, put up in neat wooden box, $5.35, express prepaid to any 
point in Canada for orders received before July \ 5th. 



Heretofore, many Hardware Merchants have been disinclined to handle Keys, owing to the difficulty of obtaining 
the proper assortment of lines. To meet this need we are placing our No. i assortment on the market. 

This assortment contains three gross of the leading patterns of Rim, Mortise, Till, Chest, Cabinet, Trunk and Ward- 
robe Keys, all of which will be found ready sellers. 

Our price is ridiculously low, only $5.35 per box, or less than iX c - P er key, an d. as tne average selling price 
would be ioc. or more, the profits are large, and the cost of the entire investment would be met by the sale of fifty keys 

Your stock can be replenished from time to time as required, and keys can easily be made your most profitable 
side line. Send a postal request for our complete 1903 catalogue, 262 pages and over 1,200 illustrations. 











it 




















o^ 



(H 



Q^"^ 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



The White Mountain 
Ice Cream Freezer 

Makes the FINEST and SMOOTHEST 
Cream the QUICKEST j* J- * * 

jilt with Triple Motion 
lex Malleable Iron Beater 
Strong Waterproof Tub 




Boon i with IT ;i\ v Galvanized 

1 1 . >n Hoops. 

Heavy Ctacoal Tioplate Can 



Covered Gearing 
double Scraper 

Will frece cream in 1 mini: r 

POSITIVELY THE BEST FREEZER IN CANADA, 

Sole Agents for Canada__^aHM^ 

The McClary Mfg. Co. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, 
VANCOUVER, ST. JOHN, N.B. 



Some 



Wringer 
Facts. 



a wringer Is not » plaything; 
it is made for work . And it has 
i" be made accordingly. The 
strain of wet clothes on u wringer 
is severe, and the wear on the 
rolls is likewise. A wringer thai 

racks, that gets out of joint, goto 
speak, that has to he hammered 
together every time it is used, 
makes had temper, had dinners, 
bad husbands. Anil rubber that 

is poor and poorly fastened to the 
shafts is worse still, for no amount 
of "fixing" will remedy these 
defects. 



We know wringers and how to make them. And we're making 
"for keeps." We can't afford to make second or third-rate wringers. 
They would soon put us out of business. 

llardwarcmen, do you sell our wringers? A question worth 
pondering. 




CANADIAN WRINGER and SPECIALTY CO 



Limited 



I05-MI Adelaide West, 



TORONTO. 



.! 



Hot-Weather Goods. 

Model Refrigerator. 

Moderate priced and excellent value. 

Built of best quality of kiln-dried lumber, panelled all 
round and finished in golden oak. 

We are sole agents for the celebrated 

Leonard Cleanable 
Refrigerator. 

We have a large stock of all kinds of 

Wick and Wickless Oil Stoves. 

The McClary Manufacturing Co., 




London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 



St. John, N.B. 



22 



Hardware unci 
Metal 



EDITORIAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN, 

Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal - 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, Eng. - - ioq Fleet Street, E.C. 

Manchester, Eng. - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H S. Ashburner. 

LONDON, Ont. ... Hiscox Building. 

Walter H. Lindsay. 

ST. John, N.B. - .- No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Winnipeg, Man. - 377 Cumberland Ave. 

D. J. Benham. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cahle Addr P « I Adscript, London, 
cable Address j Adscript Canada . 



INTRODUCING ARTICLES TO THE 
TRADE. 

SO many articles are invented and made 
up lor sale by the trade that it has 
become quite a problem to discover the best 
method of introducing the new goods — 
of placing them before the trade. 

Many inventors or selling agents expect 
that all they have to do is to produce a 
good thing at a fair price and the wholesale 
trade will be eager at once to take it up 
and bear the expense of placing it before 
the retailers. Needless to say, many who 
have gone ahead on this assumption have 
come to grief, and have found it extremely 
difficult to persuade the wholesale dealers 
to stock up a new line to take the place of 
something which has long given satis- 
faction to the trade and for which there is 
still a good demand. 

It is a fair argument the wholesale 
dealers make when they claim that the 
manufacturer should introduce the new 
article — that he should create the demand 
for it. 

Then the question arises, how can this 
be done most speedily, economically and 
thoroughly '1 To send a representative over 
the Dominion, or even 10 the chief cities, 
with some new specialty would be need- 
less, unwise and expensive. To give it as 
a sideline to some traveller covering the 



Made helps, vet does not covei the trad* 
thoroughly. The same is true of advei 
tising. It is sale io sav that more Inisi- 
ihsv 1. 111 be secured from the investment 
ol a moderate sum in advertising a new 
11 in li 1 han In the same expenditun on 
it in other ways, yel this can be made an 

altogether tOO cumbersome and expensive- 
method of introduction. It would not 
be wise in even case to advertise such an 

article to the consumer. Nine cases out 
ot ten the buyer trusts lo the judgment 
of the retailer. Therefore the selling 
agent may content himself with a good 
campaign of advertising to convince the 
retailer that the new line is worthy of 
attention, of Stocking up. Trade papers, 
as a rule, will be found ready to explain 
in their reading columns the features of 
anj new goods offered by their advertisers. 
A good description of a new article and a 
bright campaign ot advertising, even in a 
moderate-si/ed space in a trade paper with 
a wide connection, will cover the trade in 
a few weeks more thoroughly than can 
be done in any other way. 



PICTURES FROM OANADA 

\ TRADE paper called "The Indent 

aV. and Colonial Prices Current," pub- 
lished in London, England, has been run- 
ning a series of articles on "Canadian 
Development," by "authority of the Cana- 
dian Government." The text is all right, 
but we hope the Canadian Government 
didn't authorize the illustrations also. 
"Teaching a Nation to Farm," and 
" What it costs lo start a farm in Western 
Canada," are the two articles under the 
heading Of "Canadian Development," in 
the April number, and they are "illus- 
trated " by three drawings, supposed 
apparently to be typical Canadian scenes. 
The first shows a steam and sailing ship, 
of the old style, fleeing from a huge ice- 
berg, I hough it can hardly get away, is 
the whole sea surrounding it is thick with 
ice floes. The second is a spirited picture 
of a polar bear with his claws in the flesh 
of a dead whale. Me is about to be dis- 
turbed bv a boat-load of men, but they are 
not close enough for us to sec whether 
they are wearing the regulation furs and 
red feathers of the lame Canadian or not. 
In the distance is a beautiful .iceberg. A 
pair of walrus are shown in the third 
23 



piiiure. Thev have just comi oul of the 
waK-i ,u\<.\ are reposing on the ice. Be- 
hind each, in the background, is an ice 
hill. 

Imagine such pictures as ilu-se- used in 
connection with good, sensible text on the 
wheal farmsofthe Northwest and Cana 
dian industrial development generally ! 

PROSPECTS IN EASTERN ONTARIO 
tanners in Eastern Ontario report an 

exceptionally good pack of strawberries 

The rains of last week, however, were in- 
jurious to the later berries. The cold wet 
weather has practicallj killed the corn and 
there will be- scarcely any crop at all. I 
matoes show very little- better pro-: 
Peas promise- a good crop and wHI be 
ready in a week or ten days. Raspberries 
will be but half a crop owing to the frost, 
but the larger fruits are promising well. 



T 



ILLEGAL FREIGHT CHARGES. 

HI-. Canadian Manufacturers' Associa- 



tion have sent out the following 
circular: "Investigation has revealed the 
tai 1 that all changes made in freight classi- 
fication since the issue- of schedule No. I I, 
(January 1st, 1900), have been made with- 
out the approval of the Governor-General- 
in-Council, and are therefore unauthorized 
and illegal. We have the authority of 
the Department for stating this fact, and 
so advise you for your own protection, 
and to enable you, should you have' been 
Tiffected, to make proper application for 
rebate of excess payments. In the mean- 
time, Freight Classification List No. 12, 

issued May Isl, 1903, embodying all the 
changes up to date, has no authority to be 
recognized wherein it differs from schedule 
No. LI, and any freight charges collected 
by the companies may be paid under pro- 
tesi. The shippers of Canada may shortly 
be calk-d upon by the Government to show 
why the increases made in schedule* 
No. 12, should i»t be sanctioned. If you 
are interested, kindly prepare your inform- 
ation on this point, and he prepared to 
present it on short notice." 

Since L900 the mere hauls have paid in- 
creased freight rates, which they need not 
have paid, and doubtless the amount of 
money due them as a rebate is a \e-rv 
large one. It is estimated to be as much 
as S10.000. 



H»rdvr«r€> and 

M. id' 



EDITORIAL 



PRESIDENT SCHWAB'S ILL- 
HEALTH. 

r piIK Finance Committee of the United 
1 States Steel Corporation hasappointed 
W. P. Corey, the head of the Car- 
1 1 Company, assistant to the 
president, Charles M. Schwab. In the 
official statement which the company lias 
it is said that the appointment lias 
made on account of the continued 
ill-health ot Mr. Schwab. It is evident, 
therefore, that notwithstanding tir. 
Schwab'., long cruise in the Mediterran- 
ean, his health has not been fully restored. 
This is anything but good news. 

It is to be hoped with the duties o\~ his 
position as president of the United States 
Steel Corporation lightened, Mr. Schwab's 
recovery will be assured. It is not a very 
pleasing omen, however, that after the 
months spent abroad he is still not well 
enough to carry the full burden pertaining 
to the presidency of the corporation. 
Although only about 1:5 years of age, Mr. 
Schwab is one of the world's greatest 
captains of industry, to which position he 
has risen from a poor boy, depending upon 
his own ability for success. It is true that 
early in life became under the patronage 
of Andrew Carnegie, but it is equally- 
true that had he not possessed in an 
eminent degree those qualities of great- 
ness which he afterwards so sedulously 
developed he would not have risen to the 
presidency of the United States Steel Cor- 
poration. ' It was not luck which brought 
him in the way of Andrew Carnegie. 
It was his own personal qualities. 

If there is one quality more than arty 
other which Mr. Carnegie possesses it is 
that of recognizing ability in men with 
whom he is brought into contact. But in 
climbing to the position whose duties are 
beyond the ability of his impaired health 
to perform he has over-stepped the mark 
as far as his physical nature is concerned ; 
and although barely turned middle life, 
Mr. Schwab finds himself impaired in 
health and his usefulness curtailed, whcthe r 
permanently or not remains to be seen. 
It is to be hoped that it is only temporary. 

The experience of Mr. Schwab is not 
without its lesson. Men, like machinery, 
when overstrained must necessarily become 
impaired, Industry is to be commended 



Unfortunately there are too many who do 
not possess enough o\ that quality. Hut 

industry carried to excess ' s an evil. We 
tind it exemplified in Mr. Schwab. 

One frequently hears business men say 
they never take holidays. Hay in and day 

out thev are to be found in their Store, 

warehouse, or factory, but it is not all of 

life to live in this way ; and those who live- 
it will certainly prematurely shorten their 
life. 

While it is to be hoped that Mr. Schwab 
will recover, it is also to be hoped that 
those who have overtaxed their mental 
and physical natures will profit by his 
experience and give themselves the neces- 
sary relaxation from business cares that 
nature demands. 

With midsummer in our midst, it is a 
good time for business men to comtemplate 
upon those things, and to remember their 
employes as well as themselves. 



A QUESTION OF INVESTMENT. 

THE recent slump in stocks must have 
brought home to the minds of 
many who may, perhaps, have heark- 
ened to the voice of the stock market 
Circe, the extreme precariousness of this 
form of investment and the risks under- 
taken by the business man who invests 
his money on margins. 

In the face of an unprecedented wave 
of industrial prosperity, when business is 
expanding, call money easy, and dividends 
assured, with every condition present 
which should make for steady and in- 
creased values, securities of the most un- 
impeachable intrinsic worth falter, sink 
and go down with a crash before a bearish 
onslaught manipulated by a malignant 
combination of eastern operators. 

What chance has the average man who 
takes a "flyer" in stocks of gauging cor- 
rectly the designs of the magnates who 
generate these financial storm-bursts? 
The more confident he is of his position 
and the more fortunate he proves to begin 
with, the more inextricably is he likely to 
be involved when the crash comes. 

There is no more insidious form of 
gambling than stock speculation, nothing 
which so diverts a man from his own 
■i\ 



proper affairs or which so perils his solv- 
ency. Truly the stock exchange is a bot- 
tomless pit, fit habitation indeed for 
" bulls" and " bears," but no place for the 
"lamb." 

If the business man has surplus funds 
not required in his business, let him invest 
them so that they may bring assurance 
and not anxiety ; afford a dependable re- 
venue, and not open a yawning gap to 
perdition. For the busy man o( affairs, 
bound up in the interests of his business, 
it is doubtful if a more suitable investment 
can be found than one of the many forms 
ol insurance offered by our life insurance 
companies. Under our insurance laws 
the policy-holder is thoroughlv protected. 

The returns on money invested are 
usually somewhat better than can be 
secured from the bank, and the death risk 
is carried at the same time. It is true 
that an occasional lucky operator in stocks 
will make a fortune in a day. But how 
many of them retire when they have 
" made their pile ?" It is safe to sav that 
not one out of fifty quits while ahead of 
the " game." 

Of a hundred average business men let 
fifty invest their surplus cash in margins 
on stocks and the other fifty in insurance, 
what is likely to be the financial standing 
of these men at the end of a given period ? 
If one out of the fifty stock speculators has 
made a fortune it is safe to say that the 
others have made nothing and may have 
lost their all in the vain effort to cover in 
the face of an adverse market, a situation 
which in any considerable period is as 
inevitable as the seasons, and, to the 
outsider, as unpredictable as the cyclone. 
On the other hand, the policies of the men 
who have invested in insurance will be 
maturing. 

In the afternoon of life they will garner 
the fruits of a thrifty noontide. Payments 
so arranged to terminate and policies to 
become payable will make easy that period 
of life when men are wont to say, with 
Fal Staff — " Shall 1 not lake mine ease in 
mine inn ? " 

Nor are the benefits necessarily delayed 
to the close of life. There is permanent 
satisfaction in the knowledge of the fact 
that provision is made for dependent ones 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and 
Metal 



which no untoward combination of 
circumstances ran affect. 

In event, moreover, of financial diffic- 
ulties, the policy is a valuable security 
which may be relied upon either to avert 
the threatened calamity, or, m case of 
bankruptcy, to provide the means for a 
Fresh star! and an opportunity to retrieve 
a position o\ solvency. 

An investment on margins is a virtual 
hypothecation of one's credit ; an invest- 
ment in insurance is an addition to capital 
stock. 



THE GOVERNMENT TO CONSTRUCT THE 

RAILWAY. 



THE DUTY ON UNITED STATES 
STOVES 

A CORRESPONDENT of Hardware 
and Metal, a Large Ontario stove 
manufacturer, writes that American stoves 
are imported into the Canadian Northwest 
in large quantities and are sold to Cana- 
dian customers, being entered at the cus- 
toms from 20 to 30 per cent, below the 
prevailing price for the same goods in the 
United States. The correspondent con- 
cludes, "stoves are still pouring in in steady 
streams, to the great injury of Canadian 
manufacturers. " 

Hardware and Metal wrote Hon. 
Wm. Paterson, Minister of Customs, in 
regard to the matter, and in reply the lat- 
ter savs : "The Department have found 
it necessary to institute a special investi- 
gation as to the selling prices of stoves for 
home consumption in the L'nited States, 
and upon the information so obtained, 
collectors of customs were advised as to 
the prices at which stoves imported from 
the l'nited States should be allowed to 
be entered at customs. You may rest 
assured that we are fully alive to the mat- 
ter, and that we are doing our utmost to 
ensure payment of duty upon the home 
consumption value in the L'nited States of 
importations therefrom, in accordance with 
the standard laid down in the law." 

Some manufacturers throughout the 
country will be glad to know that the 
Customs Department has taken steps to 
prevent the importation of stoves at under 
valuations. It is to be hoped the Depart- 
ment will not decrease its vigilance. 



IT is definitely announced that the Do- 
minion Government will build a new 

railway to Winnipeg. When the idea was 
first mooted it was expected that the road 
would be" from Quebec to Winnipeg, as 
Hardu VRE AND METAL pointed out a week 
ago, hut as finally derided upon it is to 
run from Monclon, N.B., to Winnipeg. 
This from a national standpoint is prob- 
ably more satisfactory than if from Que- 
bec. Moncton is a point from which both 
Halifax and St. John can he readily 
reached, consequently we may confidently 
expect to see a development in these two 
ports, while the Maritime Provinces will 
at the same time he brought into closer 
touch with the West. 

Although the terminal point is to be 
Monclon and not Quebec, the latter city 
will also be benefitted by the line, for it is 
to touch that city as well, thus enabling 
the products of the Great West to be 
shippped from there in the summer and 
from the Maritime ports of St. John and 
Halifax in the winter. 

The road is to be constructed of Cana- 
dian material as far as possible and when 
completed will be handed over to the 
Grand Trunk Pacific Company, although 
other railways are to be given running 
rights under certain conditions to be deter- 
mined by the Government. The Gover- 
nor-in-Council or the Railway Commission 
will also control the freight rate. 

The equipment of the road with rolling 
stock devolves upon the railway company. 
In addition to building the road, the 
Government will also guarantee bonds of 
the Grand Trunk Pacific for the sec- 
tion of the railway to be built by the 
company west of Winnipeg to the coast. 
That portion of the new trans-continental 
line which the Government is to construct, 
will he leased to the Grand Trunk Pacific 
Company lor fifty years. For the first five 
years the company will pay no rent to 
the Government. For the next five years 
it will pay the net surplus of receipts 
over the working expenses. For the 
years remaining it will pay the Government 
:'. per .cut. on the cost of construction. 



Until details are announced In Parlia- 
ment, anything like a close analysis of 
the scheme '-in scarcelj b< made. From 
what is known of it, however, it appears 
to in- .1 fair!) satisfactory one, both from a 

business as well as a national standpoint. 

When the route of the Intercolonial 
Railway was selected it was military con- 
tingencies, not commercial necessities, 
that were the gorerning factors. The 
idea was to keep as far away as possible 
from the United States boundary line ; 
and every one knows how admirably they 
succeeded in this idea. In the construction 
ol the proposed new road, the pre- 
dominating idea is the commercial well- 
tare of the country and not its strate. 
importance. It is, therefore, likely that 
it will be a more profitable investment. 

It is understood that the work of con- 
struction of the new road is to begin at 
once, and we may, therefore, expect that 
it will be in operation at the very earliest 
possible date. It will be remembered that 
the Canadian Pacific Railway was com- 
pleted four or live years before the allotted 
time. It is to be hoped that the work on 
the new road will be pushed just as 
vigorously, for the necessity of this road is 
very great. The Great West has developed 
so rapidly during the last few years that 
the present transportation facilities are 
decided ly inadequate. 



JAMACA STEAMSHIP SERVICE 

The management of The Canada-Jamaica 
Steamship Company announces that a 
third steamer will at once be placed on 
the route, establishing a fortnightly sc rvice 
from Jamaica to Canada. In addition to 
all kinds of fruit, a departure will be made 
by the company and the cargo will also 
include general merchandise. The third 
steamer will be placed on the Canada- 
Jamaica line as soon as the requirements 
of the outwarc trade from this country 
demand it. Since the beginning o( the 
year there had been a large increas 
the trade being done between Jamaica and 
Canada. 

James Wilkins, 28 West Market street, 
is making a unique display of "Home 
Comers' Souvenirs " in the shape of the 
electric match strikers, handsomely deco- 
rated, with used match attachment. 



2.". 



Hardware and 
M.lal 



M 



ARKETS AND 




Notes 




T 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 3, 1003. 

HAHLsWARt£. 

r \^ HE hardware situation 1ms reflected 

ik> material change during the week, 

[air movement being noted and 

adj all round. -No special fea 

furnished by any particular line 

»eek but a quiet movement is noted 

in all kind* of wire, while spikes ami cut 

held steadj with a fair volume 

■ •t trading doing in all. Horsenails con 

liuue strong ami horseshoes, while quiet, 

rule lirni in price. liivets and burrs are 

in fair request and the same applies to 

bolts and nuts, and screw.-. ( ordage is 

stead) and binder twine very firmly neld. 

...I movement continues in building 

paper, and also in firebricks ami cement. 

ISA KB WIRE. There is no change and 

business is quiet. We quote : 82.80 

LOO lb. f.o.b. Montreal, ami $2.55 

i.o.b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons are 

quoted I.o.b. Cleveland at $2.45. 

i.\l.\ Wl/l.n WIRE. A small volume 
ui trade is passing. We quote : 

No. .">, $3.70; No. ti, 7 and 8, $3.15 ; .No. 
y, $2.55 ; No. K», $3.20; No. 11, $3.25; 
No. 12, £2.65 ; No. 13, $2.75 ; No. 14, 
$3.75. lu carlots, f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 
5, 52.20 ; Nos. 0, 7, S and H, $2.15 ; No. 
10, $2.20; No. 11, $2.25; ISio. 12, $2.30; 
No. 13, $2.40 ; No. 14, $2.50. In less than 
te, 12^c. per 100 lb. extra is charged. 
SMOOTH STEEL W IKE — In moderate 
request with prices steady. We quote: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net extras 
per 100 lb. are now as follows : 
Coppered wire, 00c; tinned wire, $2 ; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25 ; best 
steel wire, 75c.; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hay-baling wire, 30c. 

FINE - STEEL WIRE.— Continues un 
chang Our quotations are as 



follows 



per 



cent. , 



with 



tras : 1 and 2-lb. hanks, 25c. per 100 lb.; 
A Il>. hanks, 37^c. and £-lb. hanks, 50c. 
" BRASS AND COPPER WIRE. Quiet 

with discounts 60 per rent. 

PRESSED SPIKES.— A fair trade is 
noted with values steady. Discounts re 
main 2 n per rent, f.o.b. .Montreal. Tor- 
onto, Hamilton, London, .St. John and 
Halifax 

FENCE STAPLES. Prices are steady 
under a moderate demand. We quote $3 
pet inn it,. k,- L , foi galvanized and $2.80 for 
bright, with 25c. extra for 25 and 50 lb. 
packages. 

(|'| N V1LS. There has been a 
turnover of these and prices are unchang 
ed at 82. 15 f.o.b. Montreal. 

WIRE NAILS In active request and 

steady also. We quote carlots at 82.40 

and small lots at 82. 15 per keg f.o.b. 

noque. Montreal. London. Hamilton, 

In, I'll antl'oi d. Windsor, tint., and 
St. John. 

HORSE N \||.s Continue atronjg at 
the recent advances, with a fair demand. 

V\ . quote a~ follows ' 'Al' bland. 

" Ovul" and " New *'ity" heads, 56 per 
Countersunk " heads, 55 pel 
| i.i and, 40, 10 and 7} pel 



off; " Monarch," 50 and 7^ per 
icnt., and " Peerless," 50 per cent. 

HORSESHOES. There is a quiet trade 
moving in these. Our quotations are as 

follows: Iron shoes, light and med 

mm pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
83.65; No. 1 and smaller. 83.90; now pat- 
tern, No. 2 and larger, 83.90; No I and 
smaller, $1.15 : X L steel shoes, n»»w, 
lieht pattern, sizes I to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, $3.80; No. I and smaller, 34.05; 
featherweight, all sizes, to I, 85.35 . vo<; 
weight, all sizes, 1 to L 86.60. Shoes, 
more than one si/e in a keg, 10c. per key 
extra f.o.b. Montreal only. 

Ul\ l-'.i S AND I'd RRS.— In fair request 
in a small waj Discounts are 

as follows : Best iron rivets, section 
carriage and wagon box, black rivets, 
tinned do., coopers' rhets ana tinned 
swedes rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; swedes 
iron burrs are quoted at 55 per cent, off ; 
copper rivets, with the usual proportion 
of burrs, 45 per cent, off, and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5 lb. carton 
boxes are quoted at (>0 and 10 per cent, 
off list. 

BOLTS AND Nl TS In fair demand 
with prices steady. Discounts are 

as follows: Norway carriage bolts. 
55 per cent. : common. 50 ; full 

square carriage, 55 ; machine, 50 and 5 ; 
coach screws, 66 2-3 ; sleighshoe bolts. 
65 and 5 ; blank bolts, 50 and 5 ; bolt 
ends, 50 and 5 ; plough bolts, 50 and 5 ; 
tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; stove bolts, 
i.T | per cent. Nuts, square, 3-Jc. per Bo. 
off list ; hexagon nuts, 3fc. per tb. off 
list. 

SCREWS.— Orders for small parcel; 

continue numerous. Discounts arc : 

Hound head bright, V_>.\ per cent. ; 
Hat head bright. 87i per cent. ; 
brass, round head, 75 per cent.; brass, 
flat head. SO per cent. 

CORDAGE.- There is a fair movement 
in this line and prices are steady. Quota- 
lations are: Dure man il la. I I V. ; British 
pure manila, 12c; sisal, lHc; double 
lathyarn, 11-lc; single latbyarn, lie; 
cotton rope, lt'i|c., cotton twine, 17 and 
_'dc. for '.', and 1 ply. 

BINDER TWINE. ' In good req,ues1 and 

lirillb held at in. 1 ., to 13c. 

I'd ILDINC PAPER. A good movement 
is still in progress. We quote as 
follows : Tarred felt, $1.85 per 100 lb. ; 
- ply ready roofing, 90c. per roll ; 3 ply, 
81.15 per roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 
lb.; dry sheathing, 40c. per roll ; tar 
sheathing, 50c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. 
per roll ; taned fibre, 65c. per roll ; K 
and I X L, 70c. per roll ; heavy straw 

and sheathing, 835 per ton ; slaters' felt, 
6.5c per roll. 
SHOT. Business is quiet. We quote 

as follows: Ordinary drop shot, 
A. A. A. to dust. 86.50 per mil lb.- 
chilled. Nos. | ,,, hi, S7.Q0 per Hid 
lb.: buck and seal, 87.50 per 100 lb. : 
ball, 88 per 100 lb Trade discount. 15 
per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Ham 
ilton, Loud, ,n. St. John. N.B .: and Mali 

FIREBRICKS. There is a good trade 

in these al unchanged prices. We quote 

Follows : 816 i.. 822 pel I turn 

'••' English and $17 to $•_'- i.,, Scotch, 

as to bland 



CEMENT. In active request. We 
quote : Canadian cement, $1.90 to $2.25 ; 
German, 82.25 to $2.10; English, $2.15 
to $2.25; Belgian, §170 to 81.95 per bbl. 
ex-store, and American, $2.20 to $2.40 
ex-cars. 

METALS 

In heavy iron and metals further mod 
crate shading in prices in the Slates has 
resulted In a steadier market and QO 
further reductions are anticipated for 
the present. So far the chances across 
the line have not resulted in any changes 
locallv but with buyers uncertain as to 
whether it will paj to hold off or not 
the aggregate volume of orders is natui 
allj interfered with. At the same time 

tie. market is not by any means stag 
naiil in spite of the cautious attitude of 
buyers for there is a fair volume of 
business from daj to day right along. 
English advices state that more tinplate 

mills have been closed, some for the re 
modelling of machinery and others for 
tin- lack of remunerative orders. Ship 
incuts have been hcavv and stocks are 
much reduced as the low prices have 
led to considerable sales in all descrip 
tioiis of plates. 'fin has opened the 

Week lower while copper oil tile other 

hand is firmer, and lead is unchanged 
Spelter is higher, but these changes Oil 
the outside markets have not affected 
spot quotations at all. 

PIG IKON*.- Business is of nairovv di 
nieiisioiis and prices are unaltered. Our 
quotations are as follows : Carroll, No I. 
$21 ; do.. No. 3, $19.75 ; Middlesboro', 
No. 3, $17.75 ; Ayersome, No. 1, $20 ; 
do., No. 3, $19.40. 

BAR [RON Business is fair and prices 
are somewhat unsettled in tendency 
though not quotably changed We 

quote as follows : Merchants' bar, 
82 ; horseshoe iron, $2.25 and forged iron, 
$2.30. 

BLACK SHEETS. In fair request 
in a small way. Our quotations are as 
follows: 28 gauge, S2.45 ; 26 gauge, 
$2.40; 22 to 24 gauge, $2.35; 18 to 20 
gauge. $2.30 and 8 to 10 gauge, $2.40. 

GALA \NIZLD [RON. There is a good 

movement of these and prices remain OS 
last quoted. Quotations are as follows 

28, Queen's Head, $4.40 ; Apollo, 10£-oz., 
84.30; Eleur-de-Lis, §4.15; Comet, $4; 
Bell brand, $4.05. In less than case lots, 
25c. extra. 

LEAD PIPE. flicc is a fair demand 
for pipe. We quote 8c for composition 
waste and 7c. for ordinary, with 30 per 
cent, discount. 

IKON PIPE.— There is a good businesi 
doing, with prices unchanged. We 
quote as follows : Standard pipe, per 

ft., in lengths under I!) ft.: Black, .{ , 

$2.40; g, $2.65; h, 82.85, ■', 83.65; 1 in.. 
85.20; 1^, 87.35; 1$, 88.95; 2-in., §12.55. 
Galvanized, ,j . s."..2o ; §, 83.45; 4, 83.85; 
■;. 85 : tin., R7.20 ; I}. S 1 0.05 • 1$, 812.- 
20 ; 2-in., 416.85. Extra heavy pipe. 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 ft. as 
follows: Black. $. 84.20; #. 85.25; l-in, 
S7.55: I', 410.55; 1.1. 812.75: 2-in. ( 817.- 
fiO Galvanized, 4. 85.20; J. S0.65 ; l-in., 
89.55; l+. 813.25; 11, SIC: 2 in.. S2I.90. 

UN PLATE'. Easiness abroad has not 
ted the jobbing range here but trade 



THE MARKETS 



Hardwar* and 

M«ul 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH. 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, b'IRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . . - 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWERPJft 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

"IE CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO, ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r. quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



a 



jj 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Price to Sales Agents 

Qrummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



Is quiet. We quote coke 84.00 and char- 
ooaJ t L25. 

TERNE PL \.1 E Quiel b dy at 

$7.25. 

COLL ril \ I \ Conl urn. a Ias1 
ported. Oiu quotatioi as to I 

Iowa : N.». 6, 10c.; No. 5, 'Jo.; No. I, 
No. 3, 7c; i-m., Gic; 5 Hi -in., $4.90; g- 
in . S1.2U; 7-18-in., H; 4-in., 13.90; 9-18- 
in., $3.75; ^-in., S3. (ill; f-in., |3.50j J in., 
83.45, and 1-in., 13.40/ with 10c. allow- 
ance on carlo ts. 

CANADA PL \'N' I hen be been some 
ikI business for [all importation, but 
the actual movement from jobbers' hands 
is smaller than it was. rVe quote as 
follows: 2s, $2.60 to 92.70; 60s, $2.70 
to 82.80; 75s, $2.80 to 82.85; full pol 
ished, $3.75 and galvanized, $4.25 to 
84.35; galvanized, 60s, $4.45 to $4.55. 

STEEL. Stead) with a quiet trade. 
Our quotations arc as follows : 
Mild, $2.05; sleighshoe, §2.10 to $2.20; 
tire, §2.15 to §2.25 ; spring, $2.S5 to S3 ; 
reeled machinery, $2.75 to $3; toecalk, 
82.60 to $2.75 ; machinery (iron finish), 
§2.10; mild steel, §2.05; square harrow, 
§2.50. 

TOOL STEEL; Unchanged as fol- 
lows: Blaci Diamond, 8 to '.'o; San- 
derson's, 8 to 9c, according to the grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7-Jo.; Jonas & 
Colver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 50 
to 65c. per lb. 

INGOT COPPER. Outside fluctuation 
has - not affected spot prices which range 
from $15.50 to 815.75. 

[NGOT TIN.— There is an easier feeling 

in this metal but the spot price is un- 
changed at $33 to $33.25 per 100 tt>. 

PIG LEAD.- Rules steady at 83.15 to 
$3.25. 

SOLDER.— Unchanged at 20c for bar 
and I'.ie for wire. 

ZINC SPELTER.— No further change is 
noted from last week, §5.75 being the 
base figure. 

SHEET ZINC— Quiet as last noted at 
$6.50 to $6.75. 

SCRAP METALS- 

Business continues extremely quiet. We 
quote as follows : Heavy copper and 
wire, 10c. per lb. ; light copper, 9c. ; 
heavy red brass, 10c; heavy yellow, 8£c; 
light brass, 5c.; lead, 2 to 2£c; zinc, 2} 
to 2jc; iron, No. 1 wrought, §16 to 
§16.50 ; No. 2, §7.50 per ton ; machinery 
scrap, $16 to §16.50 ; stove plate, $13 ; 
malleable and steel, §6 ; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c per 100 lb.; old rubbers, 
fi£ to 6fc per lb. 

HIDES. 

These continue irregular, but prices are 
unchanged from last report. 

ASHES 

Continue firm ; first pots $5.20 to $5.25 

and seconds $5. 

TALLOW. 

.Market is quiei at 5^ to (>|c for n 
and •'! to Tic. for rough, with choice kid 

nev tallow 4c 

RAW FURS. 
The June fur sales were characterized 
l>\ unchanged puces as a rule, though in 
some furs there was a decline. In only 
three kinds was there an advance. These 
were: winter muskrat, which was 10 per 
cent, higher than in January ; fall and 
small muskrat. which were 20 per cent. 
higher than in January ; and American 
oppossum, 20 per cent, higher than in 
last Match. All foxes were the same as 
in March ; otter and lynx were 10 per 
27 



TINPLATES 



DOMINION CROWN —liest Best Char 
coal 

ALLAWAYS Be 

CANADA CROWN •-Charcoal. 

LYDBROOK 

TRVM 



:oke. 



All standard brands. Accept no substitute. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

599-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



THE BEST PUMP. 



When a mini comet to jrOO, and 

asks fur the beat pomp made, you 
can honestly recommend the 

McDOUGALL PUMP 

to him because — 

It is fully guaranteed. 

It is strong. 

it stands the test <>f time. 

It is neat, and well-made. 
Send for our catalogue, it tells 
all about our l'umps, and why you 
should sell them. 



The R. McDOUGALL CO , Limited 
GA.LT, oxt. 

Pig Tin 

BOUSTEAD & CO.'S PENANG. 

INGOT COPPER 

LAKE AND CASTING- 

PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 
PIQ IRON 




ADAffl HOPE & CO, 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
ft Coal Co., u.h^ 

HEW GLASGOW, B.S. 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

km& SXBJCEKS MARTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



rt.rd-w ■ 



ind 



THE MARKETS 



•ul mink ."> j >e r oast, lower. 

■ If ami fisher were 

a March prioee. Beaver 

■ d from January prices. 

Russian and white 
hi per i.iit. lower than last 
I brown bear waa 20 per 
Other furs were as follows: 

■ ut. lower than in March; 
wolverine, 10 per cent, lower; real anil 

>il chinchilla, both the same as in 
mi, the same as in March; 
black muskrat, Ehe same as in January; 
"■ pel cent, lower than 
in March . civet cat, 10 per cent, lower; 
wildcat an»l house oat, the same as in 
Mar.! inline, hair seal (dry), 

Australian oppossum, kangaroo and 
wallaby, all the same as last March; 
wombat, 15 per cent, lower, and Cape 
Horn salted fur seal. 15 per cent, lower 
than in March. A number of prices are 
paid on the local market for furs, 
according to the requirements of the 
buyer, but the prices .given below are 
about the average. The market is dull, 
there being so many furs out of season 
now . We ipiote : 



due to arrive am time now. This is the 
Maelgwyne, also from Europe. 

* « » 

Railway building is looking extremely 
active in the vicinity of Vancouver at the 
present moment. On the south side of 
False Creek, the bi^ tide arm which di- 
vides the city in tWO, there is being run 
from the Lulu Island branch <>f the C. 
r i; a spur to extend all along the south 
side of the creek to accommodate a num- 
ber of -n« and shingle mills, three of 
which are oe« and one, the old Leamy 
& Kyle mill, is being put into eon 
sion again after a silence of nearly ten 
yean. The new owners are Urquhart 
Bros., formerly of Oqurtenay, Vancouver 
Island, It is quite expected that a lino 
of mills will eventually occupy all the 
water front on the south side of the 
creek and this branch will give direct 
railway shipping facilities. 

* # # 

\t tlie western end of False (reck work 
1£ now eoiiie OB for the entrance of the 

Great Northers into this city. The right 

of Waj has I n surveyed and cleared and 



Large Medi'm Small Kitts 

BEAVER Labrador and choice Eastern 86.00 $5.00 $2.75 $1-1.50 

Territory Rocky Mountains and Western 

Strictly Prime, or. Mo. 1 6.00 4.00 2.00 .50-.75 

Partly Prime, or. No. { 4.00 3.00 2.00 .50 

rjnprime, or, No. 3 3.00 2.00 .75 .40 

Flat, weak, or poor, or, No. 4 2.50 .50 .25 .25 

Large Medi'in Small 2 

BEAK Black Choice only 15.00 10.00 7.50 6.00 

Krown " 12.00 7.00 5.00 

1 2 3 4 

l;AI)..Ki: Of all sections 50 .25 .10 .05 . 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

PIS HER Eastern and far North-Eastarn 6.50 5.00 5.00 3.00 

Territory and Western 6.50 5.00 3.5U 2.00 

Large Small 2 3 

i m and similar One bright red kinds.... 4.00 2.75 1.25 .75 

Territory and Western 4.00 2.75 1.40 .50 

Dark Fair Pale 2 

Cross Value principally as to beauty, also size & richness 10.00 7.00 4.00 2.50 

•• Silver Eastern and far Northern 75.00 50.00 25.00 20.00 

" Pacific Coast, Territory and Western 50.00-60 35.00 20.00 15.00 

Large Medi'm Small 2 

LYNX Far North-Eastern 4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2 to 4.00 

Territory and Western 4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5. (X) 2.00 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

HASTEN British Columbia, Northern Pacific and similar .. . 7.00 5.00 3.50 1.75 to 2.50 

Territory and Western 7.00 2.25 1.50 l.oo 

Quebec and Ontario 3.00-3.502.25-3.00 2 to 2.25 1.00 

Large Medi'm Small 2 Large 2 

MINK Halifax, far North-Eastern and choice 4.00 3.25 2.50 2.25 

Territory ami Western 1.50-2.00 1.50 1.00 .75 

Spring Winter Fall Kitts 



,8. 



9 o 



03 

3 4 

3.00 



.50 



;: * I 

*■ c o 
u- z. 

QD x> 

('ill IS. V carl's 

$2.00 to $8.00 
1.00 to 5.00 



3 

1.75 
1.00 

4 

.20 

.20 

3 
1.50 
9.00 
5.00 

3 
1.00 

.60 

3 
1.00 

.60 

.50 
Small 
1.50 



4 

.50 
4.50 
2.50 

.25 

•20 

4 

.25 

.20 

.25 

3 

.40 

.25 



.25 

.15-25 



Ml SKRAT -Eastern, best large 25-28. 

Territory and Western 20c. 

Large 

OTTER L»l.rador and far North-Eastern $10 

Territory anil Western 4.00 

Large 

BAOOOM -. 75-1.25 .60-75 

Black -Value according to darkness, size and beauty 2.25 2.00 



10to.l3 8tol0 2 to 5 
Sto.10 .07 2 to 4 
Small 2 3 

7.00-10 10.00-12 2.50-5 
4.50 3.50 to 5 2.25 
Small 2 3 

33-50 .25 
1.00 .50 



Black Shrt StLongSt White 
SKINK 75-1.25 .75 .40.50 .05 15 

WOLVERINE Value according to darkness, size and beauty.. 5.00 4.00 2.50 1.50 



4 

! to 4.00 
.50 
4 

.15 
.25 



Cubs 
1.00 to $2.00 
.25 to .50 



4 
.25 



CASTOUKIM 



.$5.00 to $6.00 per pound. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA MARKETS. 

Vancouver. B.C., dune 27. 

AN'i i III I'. I; big rail carrier arrived in 
port lhi~ week. This was the Brit 

ish barque Astoria, from Rotterdam 
with 2. nun tons of steel rails for The 
Canadia . Pacific Railway Co. This is 
being discharged at the old Port Moody 
wharf, the lirat terminus of the transcon 
tinental road on Burrard Inlet. The car 
go of the first el to arrive for the 

' P.K , also landed at the Port 

Moody wharf. This, with the big 
of the Achilles which was discharged at 
this port makes Dearly ten thousand tons 
of rails landed on Burranl Islet <o far 
this season foi the C.P \l alone. Over 
two thousand tons for the Great North 
•in and a small quantity for The British 
Columbia Electric Railway are in addi 

t ion to this. There is another rail ship 



the grading has been begun within two 
miles of tidewater, the road extending 

from New Westminster, and on the great 
er portion the right of way is ready 
for track laying. The entrance into the 
city is by a one per cent, grade, which 
has necessitated a cut of oxer a mile and 
a quarter to get clown to tidewater on 
False Creek. When that point is reached 
a lone- pile bridge is to lie erected cross 
ing the creek and landing in the very 

heart of the city near The Royal City 

Mills. The property necessary for the 

entrance has all been secured and the 

plans for the bridge and approach have 
been approved by the Railway Committee 
of the Dominion Privy Council. On Mon- 
day night next at the council meeting 
the railway people are intending to ap- 
ply to the corporation for the necessary 
powers to enable them to cross certain 
treete in the <itv to reach their project 
<d terminal. The line, which is known 

28 



as The Vancouver, Westminster \-. North 
em Railway, is to connect at the new 
Eraser River bridge, when that structure 
is completed, with the lines of the Great 

Northern, which at present terminate On 

the south hank of the ri\cr. The Great 

Northern Railway Co. also controls the 
charter of the old V.V. & E, line, lone 
projected as a road up the Eraser val 

ley, a short line to the boundary and 
southeast Kootenay districts. The pre 
liminary survey work before the grading 

on this line has also been begun, a Large 
stai't of engineers being now at work 
along the river. It is the intention as 
soon as the work of grading on the line 
from Westminster to Vancouver is com 

plete to put the men now cicjaLJccI there 
on the line of the V.V. & Iv, and it is 
likelv that a portion ,,f the line, at least 
as fir as ( hilliwack will he read) for 
track laying this fall. 



It was announced some weeks ago that 
the output of the shingle mills of the 
province was to he reduced materially for 
a time and to that end each mill was cut 
down to running one shift. Evidently 
that has not had the effect of bringing 

the shine le trade hack to a satisfactory 
Condition for the association has had 
several meetings on the same subject re 
Cently. It is now practically announced 
that there ma\ lie a shut down of all the 
mills, or nearly all. for a time. Over 
stocking and a Very inactive market are 
given a s the principal reasons. It might 
lie added that the demoralized condition 
of the shingle industry on the other side 
of the international boundary has had 

its effect locally, or that the same cans 
es operating there have had their in 
llueiice on the shingle trade in this pro\ 
ince. There are also some differences in 
wage scale with the shingle weavers which 
are likely to come up for adjustment in 
case the mills go on producing stock. It 
is epiite possible that a reduction will be 
demanded by the employers ; present 
prices of the product not warranting the 
prices now being paid. 
* * * 

An ill effect of the over-production of 

shingles has been seen here in the tern 
porary financial troubles of the largest 
shingle manufacturing linn in the world, 
This firm owns and operates two of the 
largest shine -le plants in the world and 
has another on Puget Sound in the 
United States trade. Possibly that eon 
nection has had an effect on the con 
cern's financial condition primarily and 
the lull in shingle business here has ac 

Centuated the trouble. The owners are 
interested in several other side issues 
connected with the lumber industry. \ 

gentleman closely connected with the 
trade is 'authority for the positive state 
meiit that there is nothing further than 
a temporary embarrassment. The con 
ecru shows a very large surplus and all 
liabilities are of a nature thought to be 
capable of holding over until they can 
realize on the enormous slock in the 
shingle warehouse's here, in transit to the 

east, and carried b\ tin- commission men 
there. The credit of the concern has 
been rated extra heretofore, 
a # # 

That the building trades are having a 
most prosperous year so far can be 
gathered from the extent of building op 
erations in this city alone during the 
first half of 1903. The building inspect 

or of the city lias iss I building pel 

mils which already total over £500,000 



THE MARKETS 



M . » t * I w « . r « • and 
M. 



and be estimates thai by the end ol 
June the total wiiJ be Eully $600,000 Eoi 
the half year Las1 year, w huh was 

fail K ac1 tve in buil ling cii clef i be 
for the twelve months was $800,000 Lx 
ill, present rate, and judging from pno 
jected work already beard of, the total 
for L903, according to the building m 
spector, is expected to run to between 

Si/200,000 and 81,300, 

# * # 

Hardwaremen report the end of June as 
particularly active, there being no let up 
in t he orders. I be past weefc bas been 

- local in the character of orders 

filled, less having been ienl to the north 
than for a month or more past. There 
is, however, as it happens, no reduction 
in northern orders as a whole In fact 
the shipments to the north yet to be 

made are exc Ungly heavy. I ho chiei 

trouble is still to get the goods. The 
quickest waj to get stocks in many line;, 
of metals and hardware this year has 
been by sailing ship round the Horn from 
England and Europe. Overland ship- 
ments by rail from the east have been 
slow and uncertain both in date of shif..- 

ping and in transportation. 

# * # 

Inquiry in trade circles obtains very 
little detail on price changes this wen , 
there being nothing of quotable nature. 
There bas been some little disturbance in 
rope prices, but that is of local nature, 

and is being adjusted. 

# * # 

'The Albion Iron Works of Victoria and 
Vancouver, with foundries in both cities, 
have opened a large warehouse on Has 
tines street in Vancouver for the pur 

pose of showing the lines of stoves, 

ranges and heaters they manufacture. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS. 

Halifax, dune 29 , L903. 

THE present month, as a usual thing, 
is about the dullest of the year in 
the hardware line, and though there 
is quite an amount of business being (lone 
in some special lines, the past month 
is about on an average with the volume 
of business done in former years. The 
reports from the various sections of ter- 
ritory covered by the travellers is en 
cptrraging as to the amount of business 
in prospect, but the same difficulty as 
noted in other lilies prevails, the inabiii 
ty of the provincial retailer to make col 
lections and as a consequence renewals 
for their own bills are larger and more 
frequent. Except in this respect, which 

can only be overcome by a good season's 

crop, or a fairly average one. the gener 
al outlook for trade may be considered 
good. I he payments from the 

mining and industrial centres are not af 
feeted to so great an extent as elsewhere. 

Considerable money is being spent 

throughout the country in building op 

elation- and by railroad contractors 
which will, in a few mouths, materially 
help the monetary situation. 

* * * 

There have been few changes in prices 
Jobbers still complain of slow delivery 

of many lines of household and builders' 
mate-rials, such as locks, knobs, and other 
lines in which there has been an unusual 
demand this season. The manufaetui 

era are heavily booked with orders, and 

until this condition is relieved the con 
dition Complained of will not lessen and 
t hese lines will no doubt remain firm. 



I he demand for builders' material i 
till maintained, although the bulk of 

the large orders have now been Idled imh 

onl\ belated eive I. 

The demand ior paints and oilfi ha> I n 

line \ and eon! iriui '■'•■ I extent 

I le , lemaud fi n nails, both w ire and cut . 

still continues and prices aie linn. \ftei 
t h I inanul'ael in e 

Montreal on -lulj s new prices maj be 
annoimced, and if anj n a K ance 

is looked [( a \\ ire fencing ha 

largelj this season anil is even now in 

fair demand, the quotations being SSJ.Gn 
to 12.75 acci irding to q rurpen 

tine is somew hat i i ban a mont h 

ago and is now quoted ai -I cents in 

barrel lots, live cenl '< '"''' for SD 

quantities. The demand for linseed oil 
up to the average of former seasons. 
Ingot tin is slightlj easier than two 
weeks ago 32 cents but a change in this 
article is considered uncertain. Two and 

three ply rooling luis declined five cents 

per roll ; while dry shcal hi ited 

by a similar advance. Cement has been 
in ood demand throughout the spring 
months and is still going out in fair 
quantities. Haying tool orders have now 

all been shipped and the trade in these 

has been above the average, with the 
exception perhaps of last year which was 
an unusuallv good one. Cordage has 
slightly advanced but the demand at 

this season is only nominal. 

R.C.H. 



MANITOBA MARKETS 

Winnipeg, dune 29, I 

HARDWARE jobbers show a satisfac 
tory continuance of activity and as 
crop prospects are excellent the 

feeling here is optimistic. Prices are mi 
'hanged throughout. We quote : 

Barbed wire, ioo lb 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 

9 

io 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 



Barbed wire, ioo lb 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire , . io 

n 

12 

13 

14 

•15 



Annealed wires (unoiled) ioc. less. 
Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 
Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No I . . . . 

No. 2 and larger 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 . . 
No. 2 and larger . 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Cut Nails— 



$3 25 
3 39 

2 50 

3 5° 
3 '° 
3 20 

3 9° 

4 45 
4 60 

£3 25 
3 25 
3 65 
3 t 
3 48 
3 56 
3 66 
3 76 
3 9' 



4 75 
4 45 
4 95 
4 7° 
4 45 
4 25 






2d 1 in $\ 10 

3d Kin. \Y% in. . 4 10 

3d iK in 3 75 

4d iK in 3 5° 

5d iK in 3 50 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2 54 in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in 3 15 

3od 4% in 3 10 

40d 5 in 3 10 

5od 5J4 in 3 10 

ood 6 in 3 10 

Bir iron, $2.70 basis. 
Swedish iron, J4.75 basis 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 



Wire Nails — 

1 in 54 25 

I'A in 4 



i'A 
2 

3 

3'A 

4 

4« 

5 

5* 

6 



2 8 S 

3 25 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE P OLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUFACTUKKIIH or 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Paper*, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTRKAT, 




COVERT MFG. CO 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps Chain, Rope and Wel> 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MFKS. HR1LK 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

•BA lJ ',.& °_^-^j?I,areost Variety, 
nE^ lK l^/VZ Toilet, Hand, ElcTtric Power) 

7/ ARE THE BEST. 

equality (;ro<nulnRand 
Bbeep -Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

send POB I aTALOt 
Amrrlcin Shearer Bfg. Co., Nashua, N.H.,1 >* 





Oon't Forget the Name. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective. 
Will clone a door against any pressure of wind 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pneumatic 
or otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingharh. 




You will be asked 
for Dundas Axes 
next fall. Are you 
preparing to meet 
the inquiry by be- 
ing able to show 
the goods ? 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Cnt. 

u I, Balimand Jr., Eastern eal 




Figure it Out 



and see if ii wouldrj 1 pay you 1 ■ 
your Printing and 
Specialist in an up-to-date . in 

and rinish. thai B it. 

Special l.onci I 
Extra quality Billhead; D; En- 

velopes, 1,000. II 00 up. 



WEESE A CO.. 54 Vongs Street, 



Toronto 



29 



H.rdx 

Mn.l 



THE MARKETS 




High-Grade 
Files an<j Rasps 

Largest Manufacturers 
in the World. 



Seven Factories. Seven Brands. 

May be purchased from all Prominent Hardware Merchants. 

Walter Grose, Selling Agent, Montreal. DOMINION WORKS, PORT HOPE, CANADA. 



BUY OF THE MANUFACTURERS 




WRITE 
FOR 
QUOTA- 
TIONS. 



RAYMOND BROS., Windsor, Ont. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ol 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs. 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



'^■^ NEW 

Rails 



12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30. 35 and 56 lbs. to 
the Yard carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 

Sessenwein Bros. 
103 Shminun St. Montreal. 



Machinery steel 3 5° 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioo lb 8 50 

Jessop 13 00 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

18 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 9° 

26 gauge 4 O0 

28 gauge 4 1° 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge 400 

18 and 20 gauge 4 °° 

22 and 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 2 5 

28gauge 4 5° 

30 gauge orio^oz 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 5° 

28 •' 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Genuine Russian, per lb n 

Imitation " " 07 to 08 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26 gauge 8 50 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 10 00 

IX 12 00 

IXX " 1400 

( ngot tin 35 

'.inadaplate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24 and 20x 28. 3 25 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead. 100 lb 5 5° 

Black iron pipe, •/» inch 3 3° 

M " 3 3° 

% " 3 4° 

A " '•■•■• 3 70 

Black iron pipe, K inch 4 3° 

1 6 25 

i'A " 8 75 

1% " 10 50 

2 " M 5° 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis $12 25 

Manila. 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathvarn " 75 

Solder 2 ° 



Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 70 

Sciews, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10p.m. 

Coach 65 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage 50 p.c. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 50 p.c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c. 

Elevator 60 p.c. 

Rivets, iron , 50 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch io)4 

X inch %y t 

S-16 inch 554 

X inch 5 K 

7-16 inch 5 

l A to M inch 4 % 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 



S3 iS 
1 90 

1 60 

2 30 
60 



Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Octagon extra 

No.i 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol s p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 18 00 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 20 

Chilled; 6 60 

30 



Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

plain 75 and 2 l A p.c. 

" pieced 

Tapanned ware 37H p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 anp 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 «nd 10 d.c. 

Green Wire Cloth 1 50 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 26'Ac. 

Prime white American 24'Ac. 

Water white Canadian 24c. 

Prime white Canadian 22 % c. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $16 per ton. 

No. 2 " 8 " 

Wrought iron scrap 5 " 

Copper (heavy) 7c. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7Kc. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2 54c. " 

Zinc scrap IC . •• 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels 5 o 79" 

Less than barrel lots o 84 

Linseed oil, raw 6g 

Boiled 6 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 28 % 

Eldorado engine 27 % 

Atlantic red w% 

Renown engine \ 2 

Biack oil I9 j4 t0 2iJ4 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil rg 

Neatsfoot oil 1 qq 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

Pure castor oil, first pressure 10 

Lubricating i 

BINDER TWINS. 

J lie. per 't> $0 iotf 

S sa 1 , per lb , t 



THE MARKETS 



H»rdw»r» and 



Standard, per lb i i u o it 

Manila, per lb., 550 ft o 13 

Manila, per lb., 600 ft o 12 % 

Manila (pure), per lb o 13 J4 

F.O.B. Chicago; discount }„c. on 5-ton luts and 
y t c. on car lots. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, July 3, 1903 

HAROWAHt£. 

L7SUALLY at this season oi tile Year 
j trade is slackening off so material 
ly that ull the trade are able to 
take things easy. This year witnesses a 

distinct reduction in the volume of busi 
oess, yet there is still a fair movemenl 
ol genera] lines, while some inaniifactur 
era have not yet caught up with the d< 

niaiul. Lubber hose orders have lou 

iinueil to come in so generously tliut it 

is now difficult to get stocks from either 

the jobbers or the manufacturers 
Screws, holts and nuts, rivets ami burrs 
are still scarce, some sizes not being pro 
curable. There is an excellent demand 
at the moment for all tinware for use 
in preserving, now being the season. A 

bie trade in these goods is looked for. 
The law 11 mower season is about over, yet 
a fair sorting trade is still doing. bene 
ing wire business is about done yet there 
are always some sales recorded. The 
Gurney-Tilden Co.,, Ltd., Hamilton, have 
issued new prices on the inside door sets 
and front door sets. The United Fac- 
tones have issued new prices on wooden 
ware. Otherwise quotations are unaltei 
ed. 

BARB W IKK.— Some orders are record 
ed at unchanged prices, the base being 
82.55 from Cleveland and LOc less in car 
lots From stock, Toronto, $2. SO. 

i:\LVAN1ZED WIRE.— A fair move- 
ment is reported. We quote : Nos. (5. 
7 and 8, 83.15 to' $3.35 per 100 lb. ; \,.. 
9, $2.50 ; No. 10, §3.20 to §3. 10 ; No. 
II. *3.25 to $3.45; No. 12, S2.li5 ; No. 
I.". *2.75 ; No. 14, $3.75 to 83.95 ; No. 
15, 94 30 ; No. L6, 84.55. Nos. 6 to 
'■> base from Cleveland ate quoted at 
82.27^ in less than carlots and at 82.15 
in carlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— A moderate 
trade doing. The base price is $2.50 per 
I un lb. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c; and 
tinning, $2 per 100 lb. extra. Shipping 
points, Toronto, Hamilton, London, and 
Montreal, with freights equalized on 
those points. 

('Oil. SPRING WIRE.— A few orders are 
still coming in ; price steady. We quote : 
No. \>, 82.75; No. 11, $3.40; No. 12, 
82.95. Ereight up to 25c per 100 lb. 
allowed on 500 It), or over. Carlots of 
15 tons, 5c. less, with freight up to 20c 
allowed. 

WIRE NAILS.— Activity continues the 
feature of trade. We quote: Carlots, 
82 In and small lots. Si'. I.", per key f.o.b. 
Gananoque, Montreal, London, Hami] 
ton, Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, (int.. 
and St. .John. 

CUT NAILS. A fair sorting business 
keeps up at 82.50 per keg f.o.b. Toronto. 

BORSE \ MLS. A fair trade is doing 

at Steady prices. We iplote : " ('" 

brand, oval head. In and 10 and 7! per 
Cent.; on •' .Monarch." 60 per cent., and 
"Countersunk" head. 55 per cent.; on 

Peerless," 15 and 7.', per cent. 

HORSESHOES. There is a Borting 
trade We quote f.o.b. Toronto Iron 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, 83.80; No I and 
smaller, 84 06. Steel, new light shoes, 
No. 2 and la '.15 V, I and 



Sparks on the Roof 



tjt |)o Dot start fires when roofs are covered with 



Eastlake Steel Shingles 



■ points thai commend them to all practical builders 



rhey prevent fire, as surely as they resist lightning *j* 
iff ijt *ft »$» t|f *J? fjt ifp«f» i$f vff *fc? ifa THM^ttr^^^^*J?*l*^T^^'J?Tfr 



*gt Besides — they're so easily fitted and laid, so abso 

rjt Iutely weal her proof, and not expensive. 

* • 

*f* \ mi 11 tintl a l)i^ trade in them. 

tf? TORONTO 



Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 



smaller, 84.20. Snow shoes, No. - and 

larger, 84.05 ; No. 1 and lighter, 84.30. 
If shipped from factory, K» to 15c. less. 

SCREWS. There is still difficulty in 
getting goods promptly to meet orders. 
We quote as follows : Flat head bright, 
ST.j per cent. discount; round head 
bright, b'2\ per cent.; flat head brass, 80 
pei cent.; round head brass. 75 per cent... 
round head bronze, 70 per cent.; Hat head 
bronze, 75 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— It is hard to 
get many sizes. A good demand is re- 
corded. We iplote : Iron rivets, 00 and 
111 per cent, discount ; iron burrs, ,V> per 
cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 15 per cent. 

HOLTS AND NUTS— A general sorting 
is reported, some sizes seemingly being 
out of the market. We quote: Carriage 
bolts, common (81 list), 50 and 10 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, full square (82.40 
list), 55 and 10 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron ($3 list), 55 and 10 per 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50, 5 and 
lit per cent.; coach screws, cone points, 
66 2-3 and Id per cent. 

BINDER TWINE.— The market is firm; 
a good trade doing. We quote : 650 ft., 
13c; 000 ft., 12c; 550 ft., II >c.; 500 ft., 

HlAe. 

CORDAGE.— A good steady trade keeps 
up in this. We quote as follows : 

Pure manila. Il\c; British pure manila, 
12c; sisal. lUc; double lathyarn. Il,\c.; 
single lathyarn, lie; double shingleyarn, 
II.U-.; single shingleyarn, lie; sashcord, 
25 to 30c. 

LAWN MOWERS. The season is about 
over but there are a few going out all 
the time. Prices are steady. We quote: 
Wbodyatt, 12 in., 87.50 ; 11 in., 88 ; 16 
in.. 88.50 ; is in., 89 ; 20 in., 810 ; Star. 
12 in., 85.50 ; I I in.. 85.75 ; 16 in., 86 ; 
Daisy. 12 in., 84.90 ; I I in., 85.10 ; Hi 
in.. 85.30; Ontario. Pi in.. 814.25; II in.. 
815.80 : Mi in., sir,. mi ; |s „,., 81S.90 ; 20 
in.. 820.50 : Philadelphia. 12 in.. 86.50 : 
I I in . 87 : Pi in., 87.50. Discount, In 

and In to 50 per cent. 

Soil PIPE WD FITTINGS. The an 
uounceinenl that aftei tie' end of thL 

31 



year no lighl soil pipe Would be made 
lias had little apparent elicit. A fan 
steady trade is reported. Discounts are 
Light soil pipe. 15 and 5 pet cent.; light 
soil pipe fittings, 5m and 5 pel' cent 1 
medium and extra heavy pipe and lit 
tings, 55 and 5 per cent.; 7 and B-in. 
pipe, tO and 5 per cent. 

BRASS 1. ODDS. There is an excellent 
demand for braes goods for waterworks 
lit tines, largely from municipal works. 

BUILDING PAPER.— A good stead) 

trade continues in all lines. We quote 
as follows : Tarred felt, 81.85 per 

bin lb.; 'J ply ready roofing, 95c. per roll, 
3-ply, 81.20 per roll; carpet felt, 82.30 
per Inn lb.; dry sheathing, 10c. per roll ; 
tar sheathing, 50c. per roll; dry fibre, 50c 
|»i roll ; tarred fibre, 65c. per rojl, K 
and I \ L, 70c. per roll, heavy straw 
and sheathing, 835 per ton ; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

POULTRY \F.TTING.-There is a good 
demand. largely for garden fence pur 
poses. Prices are nominally at tin per 
lent, for 2-in. mesh. Ill W.g.; and 50 per 
cent, for 2-in. mesh, 16 w.g. 

SCREEN DOORS.— An improvement in 
the demand is noticeable. We quote : 

Screen doors, common, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained. 1 in. style, 86.80 ; stained, 
yellow or ere,. n, s7 ; i n natural colors, 
oil finish, 88.15; 3-in. style, 20c. per doz- 
en |, 

PI l MBING FIXTURES.-The demand 
keeps active, and some lines of earthen 
ware stocks are light. Prices a iv steady. 

IM BRER HOSE.— Stocks are practically 

sold up. and retailers may have trouble 

in [retting sortinir orders tilled promptly. 
Pawn standard is now quoted a1 
I '■'' ft. for .'. in. ami b'.e. per ft. for r-in 
FORK II WDI.LS The,,- is a brisk 
business at the new discount. 50 per cent. 

PPKSSF.D SPIKES, Nol mud, doing 

in this line this week. We quote per 
as follows : J in. \ I. I', in.. 84.75 ; 5 Hi 
in. \ 5. (J in . XI. 50 ; J i„ x 6, 7 8 in 
«4.25 ; 7 16 -in. i 7. 8 in.. 84.10 : ] in. x 
'I. Hi. P-'in.. s:i.qn. The discount is 20 
■lit. 
TIW\ \l:i: WD ENAMELWARE \ 
good general trade is doing, but there is 



HartUvarc and 

M.-nl 



THE MARKETS 



l< mand for tinware, 
purposes, Pi ices un 

Mil i\ . \\ [RIMM1NGS. Tli.' txade is 
but some orders are still 

lemand continues ac 

all offerings, both of for- 

ornesl production. We quote 

- follows: Canadian 

50 ; German, 82. Ill 

prlish, 82.30 ti 82 56 . hy 

draulie, 81.50. Small quantities bj 

1m mi; SK is. rhe Gurney Tilden 

Limited. Hamilton, have issued the fol- 
lowing li-i for inside and front door 

i s > 1 1 • k r -i: ra 

Kini-llcs. 
\ No. 100. 

\ IVt DozeD B 

-in 00 »1'J 00 

11 M 13 50 

10 W 12 OU 

11 50 13 50 
i DOOB SET. 

Pei - Per Bet 

- i marked E are fitted with our No 98J May 

. i.K-k. 

WOODENWAEE.— The raited Factories 
have issued the following list prices for 
woodenware : Washboards— Victor, si. 25 ; 
Crown. §1.30; Improved Globe, {1.45; 
Standard Globe, $1.55 ; Original Solid 
Globe, 81.70; Superior, solid hack. |1.85; 
Jubilee, 81.85; Pony, 81.05. Talis— No. 
0, 81U ; Nil I, 88; No. -. S T : No. 3, §6. 

METALS. 

\- Toronto is en fete this week the 
amount of business being- transacted with 
local manufacturers is moderate. Buyers 
throughout the country are more active. 
The situation is much the same as last 
week. Buyers of iron are still taking 
deliveries of small orders rather than 
placing their contracts for the last half 
of the year. Tin has fluctuated consider- 
ably, but is now 20c per tut. higher at 
New York than at the first of the month, 
when it leached the lowest point since 
January. The tendency in copper has 
been downward. though an occasional 
advance is noted. 

PIG IKON. The feeling is undoubtedly 
steadier, . but many buyers do not yet 
tteem to be disposed to give long- con- 
tracts. A good demand is reported to 
meet immediate requirements. We quote 
f.o.b. Toronto, Hamilton and Midland, 
No. I. 822; Sydney No. I, 820; No. I 
■ lairow. 821 ; No. 2 Summerlec, 825. 

BAK IRON. There is a .steady demand, 
with prices being -haded by some dealers. 
Tin- base price i- now 82. For extras, 
cut to length while rolling: 2 ft. and 
over, 10c. per 100 lb.; I ft. and under 2 
ft., I.V.; under 1 ft., 20c; over 20 ft., by 
special agreement, according to length 
and 

STEEL BOILEB PLATES.— A fair 
trade i- doing at -t«ad\ figure. The base 
price i- 81.96 f.o.b. Toronto. 

TOO). STEEL. There is an excellent 
demand. Price- are steady. We quote : 

B I " and " Black Diamond," I 
lb-.; Jessop's, Morton's and Firth's, 
lie.; Jonas & Colver's, Hi to 20c; ditto, 
" Aii- Hardening." 70<J. per lb.; 'ha-. 
Leonard'-. S to 9c; I 'ark - " Silver," 12 

to I lc; I'ai ! ial." 15 to 20c. 

MACHINERY STEEL. The activity 

continues, with [nice- firm at 82 t" 
f.o.b. Toronto. 
COKE In good demand. Quotations 

6.75 to 87.15 for 72-hr., and 
i.,i 1-hr. furnace coke, f.o.b. 



n to. 
BLACK SHEETS.- A steady demand 
continues. We quote Common, 83.15 

for 2s eaiie,- and dead Hat. 88.50 for 26 
gauge. 

t \\ M)\ PLATES. The bulk of im- 
port business has been done, yet there 
til] some import orders coming in. 
Orders from stock are light. Prices are 
steady. We quote : All dull. 82.90 to 
Ml; half-polished, 82.85 to 83.10 and all 
bright, 83.75 to 83.85. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS, an excellent 

demand is noted. Business in this line 
shows large expanse over that of forme) 
years. We quote: Queen's Head, 84.50. 
for 28 gauge; American, 84.40 for 21 
gauge; Bell brand. 84.30 for 26 gauge; 
■ >n (row II, SI. ."id for 28 gauge. 

II V The statistics for the month and 
the first half of the year show the mar- 
ket to be of only moderate strength. 
Prices are steady, however. We quote 
s:$;{ to 833.25. 

TIN I'LATKS.— The demand is more ac- 
tive. We quote : Charcoals, ¥4.75 to 85, 
and coke-. 84.25 to si. 50 per box. 

COPPER.— Orders are coming in fairly 
well at unchanged figures. VVe quote : 
Ingot copper, S15, and sheet copper, s2 1 
to 822 per LOO lb. 

BRASS.— Unchanged in price and in 
good demand. Discount, 10 per cent. 

LEAD. — A firm market and a good de- 
mand. We quote : §3.50 per 100 lb. for 
pig lead, and 83-75 for bar lead. 

IRON PIPE.— An excellent trade con- 
tinues, with prices steady. We quote ; 
Pet 100 ft.: Black pipe, i~in., *3.15 ; 
.{-in., 82.40; l-im, §2.65; £-in., $2.85; 
a-in., §3.65 ; 1-in., §5.25 ; 14-in., 87.35 ; 
H-in., SS.95 ; 2-in., 812.55; 2> in., §20; 
3-in., 823 ; :'..', in., 830 ; I in., 836. 

ZINC SPELTER— The market is firm 
at t>\ to 6£c. per lb. 

ZINC SHEETS. — We quote base price 
as follows : Cask lots, $0.75 to §7, and 
part casks, §7 to $7.25. 

SOLDER.— In good demand. Prices are 
are unchanged. Guaranteed half and half 
is quoted at 18 to 19c., and wiping 17 to 
L8c 

HIDES, SKINS AND WOOL. 

The hide market is quite active this 
week. Prices are lirm, and things are 
moving well in sympathy with the Chi- 
cago and New York markets. The calf 
skin market is very dull. As the season 
advances lamb skins are becoming more 
valuable ; they are now worth 5c. each 
more than last week. There has bees an 
advance in the price of wool. Unwashed 
is (pioted .lc per lb. firmer, and fleece 
i to lc. per lb. firmer. The wool market 
is fairly active. We quote : 

BIDES.- No. I green, 8c; No. 2 given. 
7c. per lb.; No. I green, steers, S! 2 c.; No. 
2 green, steers, 7£e. per lb.; cured, per 
lb . s 1() s.'.e. 

CALFSKINS.— Veal skins, No I, to 
I I lb. inclusive. 9c; No. 2, 7c.; No. 1, 15 
to 20 lb. inclusive. 8c; No. 2. 6c. Dea 
cons (dairies), each, 60 to 70c. Lamb- 
skins, each 25 to .''.He; pelts, each. 20 to 

25c. 

WOOL.— Unwashed wool, per lb.. 8 to 
9c; fleece wool, IH to I5.\c.: pulled 
wools, super, per lb., i.5c; extra, 18c. 

TALLOW. We quote 5 to 5£c. per lb. 

OLD MATERIAL 

There is an excellent demand. Prices 

bead) throughout. Dealers quote as 

follows : Heavy copper and wire, 11-Jc 

per lb.; light copper, 10c. per lb.; heavy 

red brass. I0.V. per lb.; heavv yellow 

32 



brass, si,- | .,.]• |b.; light brass, (ic; lead. 

-rap /in.'. :', |c; iron. No. I 

w rought, S| | per net ton ; No. 2 

wrought, 85; machinery cast scrap. 816; 

stove plate. S| | : malleable and steel, 

87; old rubbers, < ', ] < ■ . per lie, and conn 
try mixed rags, 50c. per Inn lb. 



THE UNITED STATES NAIL MARKET. 

Cut Nails. — Demand is not particularly 
active and mills are aide to make prompt 
shipments. The lighter call for nails is 
attributed, in part, to labor troubles, 
which arc more or less prevalent through 
out the country. The market is firm anil 
quotations are as follows: 82.15, base, 
in carloads and $2.20 in less than car- 
loads, f.o.b. Pittsburgh, plus freight in 
Tube Rate Book to point of destination ; 
terms (50 days, less 2 per cent, off in 10 
days. 

Wire Nails. — The largest part of the 
nails being shipped from the mills are on 
contract orders, specifications on which 
arc coming in quite freely. Current de- 
mand covered by new orders is only fair. 
Prices are considered low by some in the 
trade and as not particularly remunera- 
tive to mills who do not manufacture 
their own raw material. Under these 
conditions the market remains lirm. The 
view is held that nails will not be lower 
in price, at least this year, and that 
large buyers are recognizing this. — Iron 
Age, June 18. 



A BIG JOURNEY TO EDMONTON. 

IN an interview published in the June 
20 issue of ''Hardware and Metal," 
R. C. Steele was reported to have 
referred to a store-keeper who had 
travelled 25,000 miles tram the north to 
reach Edmonton. Mr. Steele's figures 
were 2,500 miles. This journey, to any- 
one acquainted with the conditions of 
travelling- in the West, was surely long 
enough, a stupendous one in fact ; but 
the printer added a third cypher, making 
a journey which would be impossible even 
in a country of magnificent distances like 
Canada. This made what was a re 

markable fact appear to be an absurdi- 

ty- 

Mr. Steele has just received a letter 
from E. P. Crossland, manager of the 
company's Winnipeg branch advising that 
the exceedingly favorable outlook for the 
crop conditions as seen by him are still 
continuing and while it is still too early 
to count upon the ultimate outturn of 
the crop, owing to the many contingen- 
cies that may happen between now and 
in gathering of harvest, it is very en- 
couraging to both the east and the west 
that the crops in Manitoba and the Ter 
ritories have made such an exceedingly 
favorable start and which, together with 
the largely increased area reported in 
Manitoba by the latest Government bul- 
letin, should under ordinary circumstances 
-ive a crop fully equal to that of last 
year with the possibility of it showing 
25 to .'!■''. I 3 per cent, of an increase in 
quantity. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADA AND AFRICA 

WE. EARLE, head of The Earle 
. Publishing Company, St. John, 
N.I!., who has hut recently returned from 
a sex months' visit to South Africa, says 
that trade in that country since the close 
of the war lias begun to pick up wonder- 
fully, and that it is beginning to feci the 
stimulus of competition. 

He thinks that the present would he a 
good lime for Canadian firms to enter the 
South Africian market. There is a good 
Open market for food products, canned 
goods and manufactures, which, he thinks, 
Canadians might easily capture, provided 
they pay particular attention to the packing 
of the goods so that the articles may 
arrive on the market in the best possible 
condition. 

He found that the merchants there are 
anxious to get into closer touch with 
Canadian conditions, and with this in 
view a number of them will attend the 
convention of the Chambers of Commerce 
of the Empire to be held in Montreal in 
August. 

INQUIRIES ABOUT CANADIAN TRADE 

The following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade re- 
ceived at the Canadian Government office 
in London, Eng. 

1. Inquiry is made for the addresses of Canadian 
shippers of box-shooks by a London firm in a posi- 
tion to place large orders. 

2. A North of England correspondent has asked 
to be placed in communication with Canadian ex- 
porters of manufactured horse hair. 

3. A London export merchant has requested to 
be referred to large flour millers in Canada who are 
interested in the South African market. 

4. Application has been received for the names 
of the leading iron and steel manufacturers in the 
Dominion. 

5. A Liverpool house wishing to obtain supplies 
ofbasswood broom handles, 50x1 %, invites quota- 
tions from Canadian manufacturers. 

6. A Manchester house desires to be placed in 
touch with Canadian producers of mica. 

7. The proprietors of a chemical specialty for 
electrical batteries is prepared to appoint some 
Canadian firm connected with the electrical trade 
as agents. 

8. The manufacturers of a patented wire strainer 
Mish to arrange with some Canadian firm to manu- 
facture and sell the tool in Canada. 

9. A firm of Bordeaux wine shippers wishes to 
appoint an influential Canadian resident agent. 
First-class references required. 

10. A firm manufacturing ventilating appliances 
of all kinds is prepared to appoint suitable Cana- 
dian resident agent. 

11. An inquiry has been made for the names of 
Canadian wholesale firms wishing to import teas 
direct from India and Ceylon. 

Interested parlies may obtain the ad- 
dresses of the above inquirers by com- 
municating with the editor of HARDWARE 
and Metal. 




ON I (Ilk). 

L\V. PIERCB & SOX, livery, Aylmcr 
and St. Thomas, have sold out their 
St. Thomas branch to Parker & Son. 
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 
British Columbia Standard Mining Co., 
Ltd., Vancouver, have been incorporated. 
Big Bend Lumber Co., Limited, Van- 
couver, have been incorporated. 

China Creek Lumber Co., Limited, Van- 
couver, have been incorporated. 

Land Clearing & Enterprise Co., Limited, 
Vancouver, have been incorporated. 

Port Renfrew Lumber Co., Limited, 
Vancouver, have been incorporated. 

NEW BRUNSWICK. 

David O'Connell, livery, St. John, has 
sold out to W. & J. Hogans. 

QUEBEC. 

Bedford Graham Co., sawmill, New Liske 
ard, are commencing business. 

J. W. Boyd & Co., lumber, etc., Out- 
remont, have registered. 

Andrew Vallani, sawmill, L'Annonciation- 
was burned out. 

Aubert & Gagne, sawmill, St. Giles (Lot- 
biniere Co.) have registered partnership. 

The assets of the business of John F' 
Moir, sawmill, St. Moise, were sold. 

Riesberry & Co., pumps, Brandon, are 
succeeded by The Riesberry Pump Co., Lim- 
ited. 

MANITOBA. . 

Brandon Farmers' Elevator Co., Limited, 
• Brandon, have sold an elevator to Alexan- 
der & Law Bros. 

The business of F. R. E. DeHart, lumber 
merchant, Grand Coulee, is advertised for 
sale. 

The business of John Barry, feed and im- 
plements, Makinak, is advertised for sale. 

Peter Patenaude, livery, YVetaskiwin, 
was burnt out. 

The Northwest Lumber and Commission 
Co., Limited, Winnipeg, has been incorporat- 
ed. 

Winnipeg Machinery & Supply Co., Winni- 
peg, are negotiating to sell out. 

Plum Coulee Milling Co., millers, Plum 
Coulee, sold out to William Peters. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



JAMACA TO EXHIBIT. 

Li. Eustacbe Burke, commercial agent 
for Canada in Jamaica, reporting to the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, 
states thai the Agricultural Society of the 
island has voted a credit so that Jamaica 
may be fittingly represented at the Domin- 
ion Exposition in Toronto in August next. 
Hon. Sidney Oliver, Colonial Secretary, 
who is now in Boston, promises to \isit 
Toronto before his return to Jamaica. 



Advertisement* under 1 1 > i« beading, 2c. a word 
i riion; to. ii word inch subsequent Insertion; 
cash iii advance, Letters, figures, and abbn riatlona 
each count us one word in estimating cost 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



AT ON< E A In t-i '.i;s lathe hand for planing 
Mill ; . 

for right man The Blonde Lumber and Manufac- 
turing (Jo., Limited, Chatham, Ont. f 

ELECTRICIAN-— For the Ilespeler municipal 
electric light plant ; must be good practical 
man ; able to do line work ; state experience and 
salary wanted and when at liberty. Apply to |. 
W. Christman, Chairman Electric Light Com- 
mittee, Hespeler, Ont. f 

FlkST-CL ASS Tinsmith---One used to general 
jobbing. Apply |. I. Henderson, Niagara 
Falls, Ontario. f 



WANTED — Tinsmith for general tinsmithing 
and furnace work; highest wages and 
work; state experience. Apply to Joseph Polls, 
Djrchester Station, Ont, 26-2 



WANTED — Experienced hardware packer for 
Winnipeg; steady employment. Box 10, 

Hardware a.nd Metal. 271 

WANTED — To purchase, two new or second- 
hand traveller's sample trunks, for guns and 
rifles. State price and description to box 

Hardware and Metal, Montreal. 27-1 

WANTED— Two good blacksmiths. — one car- 
riage and one general smith. Apply Mac- 
Kenzie & Co., blacksmiths, Brandon, Man. f 

WAN TED— At once — Carriage bla ksmith ; 
highest wages paid to good man. Apply to 
Win Lawson, carriagemaker, Dundas, Ont. f 

WANTED — too machinery moulders and core- 
makers ; steady work ; wages for moulders 
at least $1; coremakers, (3.25. Address Postoffice 
Pox 511, Toronto. • f 

WANTED-Five (5) plumbers and steamfitters; 
to go out of the State ; steady work ; none 
but first-class men need apply ; give reliable refer- 
ence and state age and whether union or non-union. 
Address F., Box 679, The Globe. f 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



YOUNG man with twelve years' experience in 
wholesale and retail hardware desires situa- 
tion, either inside or on the road. Box 39, HaRD- 
\\ \kk and Metal. -.7-2 



Hardware and Metal 

. has inquiries from time to time 
from manufacturers and others wanting 
representatives 'n the leading business 
centres here and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their names 
and addresses placed on a special list kept 
for the information of inquirers in our var- 
ious offices throughout Canada and in 
Great Britain without charge. 

Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 

Montreal and Toronto 



Hird*orr >nd 
Metal 




BENZINE AS A SUBSTITUTE FOR 
TURPENTINE. 

I\ answer i<> an Ontario enquirer as 
t.- whether benzine when need in small 
quantities For thinning paint is as 

good as turpentine, or what injury, if 
anv, it would do to oil paint. The 
Painters' Magazine says: "Deodorized 
benzine replaces spirits of turpentine to 
eat extent, and during the Oivil 
War it was almost universally employed 
and a high price paid for it. It is now 
at extent in place of tur- 
pentine by the manufacturers of low 
priced varnishes and ready-mixed paints. 
and almost to the exclusion of turpen- 
tine bv the manufacturers of agricultural 
implements, farm wagons and the shade 
cloth industry. Wherever a low-priced 
solvent or volatile vehicle is desired it 
finds a readv market. And wherever it 
t ,,h- necessarv to cover a surface 
with Paint, that is to drv rapidly and 
that is afterwards protected bv varnish, 
it serves the purpose, because of its rapid 
and complete evaporation. But while it 
is reallv a more reliable thinner for paint 
than fatty or adulterated turpentine, it 
not replace spirits of turpentine by 
anv means, as it leaves oil paint on dry 
incr more porous and less binding. Nor 
can it be employed with satisfaction by 
the coach naioter for thinning his colors 
or l>v the decorator for interior work. 
allv in enamelin". Trv it for i-our- 
solf hv mixing color fairlv stout with oil 
and drier, then thin one half of the paint 
with turpentine and the other half with 
a similar measure of benzine : apply the 
two mixtures. side by side on an old 
painted board, and expose the board for 
a week or so and Bee what happens." 

RE^AINTI^G RUSTED IRON BARS. 

A CORRESPONDENT to The Painters' 
Magazine asks for the best math- 
r.d of re-painting iron bars which 
have become badlv rusted. The answer 
given is terse : "If we were able to give 
von a receipt for the prevention of rust 
on iron, after rusting has once set in. 
that is to arrest rust, we would be do 
intr what no mortal has ever done be- 
fon or will ever do in the future. We 
cannot upset the laws of nature, although 
if the proper precautions were taken 
in the first place the corrosion of iron 
and steel could be minimized. The be I 
lo treat the iron bars in question 
_,•• them a thorough scraping with 



old files, removing all the visible rust, 
loose or otherwise. Then sandpaper and 
dust them off, and finally clean them by 
a wash of benzine. When dry give them 
ast one eoat of pure if«l lead, mixed 
from the dry article with raw oil and 
turpentine, equal parts, to which a little 
oil drier is added. If you cannot afford 
to give two coats give only one. Finish 
with a good black paint made from pure 
lampblack, boiled linseed oil and japan, 
or a good varnish black, but leave as- 
phaltum severely alone, as it will not 
stand the service yon speak of. One 
Coat of red lead and two coats of black 
should give good ser\ ice under the con- 
ditions named." 

THE CHICAGO FLAXSEED MARKET. 

The week has seen the largest drop in 
seed prices that has been recorded for 
many a day. The market closed last 
night fully (i.\c. below the quoted figure 
of a week ago for No. 1 Northwestern, 
and fie. below on futures. The market 
was weak on Thursday, but the break 
came on Friday, when speculative holders 
of seed began to let go their holdings in 
the Northwestern markets and sold at 
whatever price they could get. On that 
day the decline was 4}c. at Duluth. It 
has been evident for many weeks, in fact 
for many months, that a good part of 
the strength in flax was due to specula- 
tive buying. Strange as it may seem, 
there were many buyers who really ex- 
pected to see higher figures toward the 
close of the crop year and were willing 
to back their judgment with their money. 
They lost heavily in the recent liquida- 
tion, and the market has lost their sup- 
port . -Paint, Oil and Drug Review, June 
24. 

VICE-PRESIDENT COTTINGHAM. 

In last week's issue of " Hardware and 
Metal." the position to which Walter H. 
Oottingham. of The Sheru in Williams 
Co.. has been appointed was referred to 
erroneously as second vice-president. This 
Along, his position now being that 
of vice president and general manager. 

ILLUSTRATED BRUSH CATALOGUE. 

Meakins iV Sons, Limited, Hamilton. 
have issued a 108-page illustrated cata- 
logue and price list of brushes, brooms 
and woodenware. V.mong the lines 

shown are paint. varnish, kalsominc, 
whitewash, tar or roofing brushes, dec- 

34 



orators' and painters' line brushes, ar- 
tists', gilders' and druggists' pencils and 
brushes ; clothes, hair, tooth, lather and 
bath brushes : brooms, whisks, mops, 

dusters, door mats. etc. This catalogue 
will be sent to any reader of " Hard- 
wnie ami Metal" making application for 
it. 

NEW GLASS COMPANY 

The Crown Art Stained Class Company, 
Toronto, have been incorporated with a 
capital of 840,000, to carry on the busi 
ness of glass working and dealing in 
glass. Directors : R. L. Smith, John 
Hurst. George Bowman. Herbert Smith, 
W. .1. Armstrong. W. H. .JclTerys and W 
Jefferys, all of Toronto. 

ARTISTS' MATERIAL 

Geo. Ptidout & Co., Toronto, are agents 
for Canada and the United States for 
Falens & Co.'s waterproof drawing inks 
and " Rembrandt" water-colors. These 
drawing inks are perfectly waterproof 
and are widely and heartily endorsed. 

Rembrandt" water-colors are made in 
Holland, and are used by the best Dutch 
masters : no finer goods are to be had. 
Another line of artists' materials Messrs. 
Ridout & Co. are agents for is the 
bronzes made by Carl Eckardt, of Fuerth, 
Germany. The trade is invited to send 
lor price lists and descriptive literature. 

PA'NT AND OIL MARKETS 

MONTREAL. 

THE paints and oil market has re 
corded no change in the matter of 
values this week, the firm feeling 
being retained on turpentine, while other 
lines are steady. The active movement 
in Paris green is maintained while white 
lead and liquid paints are by no means 
neglected. 

GROUND WHITE LEAD.-Best brands, 
Government standard, $5 to 85.25 ; No. 
1, $4,274 to $4.87$ ; No. 2, 81.40 to 
$4.50; No. 3, $4.02} to 84.12} ; No. 4, 
$3.65 to $3.75, all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms. 
four months, or 3 per cent, off for cash 
in 30 days. 

DRY WHITE LEAD.-84.75 ,n casks and 
in kegs, $5. 

DRY WHITE ZINC.— Pure dry, in casks, 
fijc; in 100-lh. kegs, 6fc; No. I, zinc, in 
casks, 5Jc; in 100-lb. kegs, 5|c 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil)— Pure, 25 
!h. irons, 8c.; No. 1, 7c; No. 2, Gc 

PU'ITY.-We quote : Bulk, in barrels, 



Hardware and 
Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



UNSEED 01 



Raw and Boiled 



.< 



GUARANTEED PURE" 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 



MONTREAL 



LIMITED 



BARRELS WANTED!! 



We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 




[fa, Cofneille & Co, 



MONTREAL 



lu 



nd Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



- ~ ^ 

White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 





When a merchant selects goods without a blemish it means that every transaction 
must please the customer. These are the good goods that keep your clerks busy: 

Boeckh's Standard Brushes and Brooms, 
Bryan's London Brushes, 
Cane's Newmarket Woodenware. 

If our representative does net visit your town, write us, and we will, if possible, 
arrange for him to call upon you, or we will send you quotations and full particu- 
lars of these goods by mail. Our illustrated 1903 Catalogue free for the asking. 

UNITED FACTORIES, Limited, 



Head Office : Toronto. 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factorios. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



HONTREAL BRANCH : I and 3 De Bresoles St. 
LONDON BRANCH : 71 Dundas St. 



35 






PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Ik. in 100 lb 
bladdi rs, in I 

IINERA] : 100- 

lt). 

nine i oil lead, iii i 

84.75 ; in less 

• It. No 1 red 

nl smaller 

1,11" 1 1 \ 1. •■ . : in less 

quant lies, e litharge, casks, 

100 tb. 

I. IV-! I D OIL Raw, 1 to 1 bbls., 57c.; 

5 to 9 bbls.. 5bc; 

rms, net cash in .'SO days. 

Delivered in Ontario, between Montreal 

and Oshawa, at J.- per gallon advance. 

Tl RPENTINE Single bbls., 75c; 2 to 
1 1>1>|. rerms, net cash in 30 daj s. 

BENZINE 25 to 26c. 
SHELLAt VARNISH.— Pure white, 

' ; orange, 82.10 to S2.25. 
MIXED PAJ 20 to 81.40 per 

on. 
I LSTOR OIL.— 8| to ( .)}c. in wholesale 
lots, and Ac. additional for small lots. 
\I. 0IL.-48 to 50o. 
I OD OIL.-35 to 374c 
PURE CANAD1 W PARIS GREEN.- 
Petroleum barrels, 15£c. per lb.; arsenic 
l-'jc •.: 50 and 100 1b. drums, 16c; 
25-lb. drums, I6jc; 1 - lb. packages, 17c; 
A lb. packages, 19c. ; lib. tins, 16c; £-lb. 
tins, 20c 

PORE ENGLISH PARIS GREEN.- 

leum barrels, 1 l.\c; arsenic kegs, 

50 and 100 : lb. drums, 15c; 25-tb. 

drum l-lb. paper boxes, 16c ; 

I lb. tins. 17c. 

rORONTO. 

Bi r>INESS continue* active in sun 
prepared paints, varnishes, 
taples aic not in great 
demand, a quiet sorting trade l.e!ng done 
with some dealers. Prices are steady, as 
the tendencj at primarj markets Beems 

to high Turpentine i 

at outside points are Ic. higher, but the 
quotations for delivery in Toronto, Mam 
i I ton and London an.- unchanged ; other- 
wise there are no alterations. We quote: 
WHITE LEAD.— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, 85.10 to §5 25 . No, I. 
>T B74 ; No. 1, 84.25 to 84.50 ; No. 3, 
. to 84.12^ ; No. 1, 83.VJ io §3.75 
•n pa if 25-lb. and upwards ; Ac 

lb. extra will be charged for 12^-lb 
inline dry white lead, in 
15 02$. 

RED LEAD.— Genuine, in casks of 560 

". ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 
I, in casks of 560 lb., 
Si t 5 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb., 

81.25 to 84.50. 
• LITHARGE.— Genuine, 6 to 64c. 



WHITE ZINC— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks. 86 '■' 16.25 ; l.ehigh, in casks. 

SHINGLE STAIN.— In five gallon lots, 

60 to 85c. per gallon. 

PARIS WHITE.— OOo. to $1 per 100 lb. 

WHITING.— 65c, per 100 tb ; Gilders' 
a luting, 80c 

GUM SHELLAC— In cases, 35 to 37c; 
in less than cases, 40 to 42c per lb. 

LIQl II) SHELLAC— Pure orange, in 
bbls., 82.30 to 82.40; white, 82.35 to 
82. !.") per gallon ; in less quantities, 10c 
extra. 

GLUES— Broken sheet, in 200-tb. bbls., 
8 to SJc per lb ; cabinet glue, in bbls., 
llj to 12c; emery glue, in bbls., 17c; 
bookbinders', ground, 104c; finest Amer- 
ican, white, 19c : No. 1 American white, 
15c. per lb. 

PUTTY. -Bladders, in barrels, 82.10; 
bladders, in 100-lb. kegs, 82.25 ; bulk in 
barrels, 81-80 ; bulk, less than barrels, 
and up to 100 lb., 82.05 ; bladders, bulk 
or tins, less than 100 tb.. 82.75. 

PARIS GREEN— Petroleum bbls., 13 
to 15.Jc per lb.; arsenic kegs, 134 to 
154c; 50 and 100-tb. drums, 14 to 16c; 
25-lb. drums, 11J to 164c; lib. packages 
154 to 17c; 4-lb. packages, 17 to 18c ; 
1-tb. tins, 16 to 18c; 4-Tb. tins, 17 to 
19c 

PLASTER PARIS.— New Brunswick, 82 
per barrel. 

PUMICE STONE.— Powdered, 82.50 pel 

cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c. per tb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c. in small lots and 
8c in bbls. 

LIQUID I'M NTS. -Pure, 81.20 to 81.40 
per gallon; No. I, 81.10 per gallon. 



BARN PAINTS.-65 to 70c per gallon 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, S to 
9c. per tb. ; and 9 to 10c for single tins. 

LINSEED OIL.-Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 61c; 
boiled, 64c; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 60c ; 
boiled, 63c; 6 to 9 barrels, raw, 58c. ; 
boiled, 61c delivered. To Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London, 2c less. All quanti 
ties of 10 barrels and over of linseed oil 
sold only f m.I)., Toronto, Hamilton, Lon- 
don and Guelph. 

Tl RPENTINE. Single barrels, 75c; 
2 to •'! bbls., Tic delivered, Toronto, Ham 
ilton and London, 2c less. For less quanti 
tics than barrels, 56. per gallon extru 
will be added, and for 5-gallou packages, 
50c and 10 gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 



WINDOW GLASS 

mux rREAL. 

Business in window glass is quiet and 
prices hold steady. We quote as fol 
lows: First break, 50 ft., 82; second 
break, 82.10 for 50 ft. ; first break 100 
ft.. 83.80 : seoond break, 84 ; third 
break, 84.50 ; fourth break. 84.75. 



TORONTO. 

Import orders are about delivered, yet 
there is a fair sorting trade done from 
stock. We quote: Star, under 'Jliin.. 

83.80 : 26 to 10 in., 81 : II to 50 in . 
84.50 : 51 to 60 in.. 84.75 : 61 to 70 in.. 
85; 71 to 80-in., 85.50. Toronto. Ham 
ilton and London. Terms, four months, 
Or 3 per cent., 30 days. 



EXPERIENCE COUNTS 



ARS 




That's what we've had of it, and during all that time we've been 
closely studying every detail of the business to bring our products to the 
borders of perfection. We've succeeded, and continued efforts shall always 
back us up. 

Last year when we introduced Brandram's B. B. Genuine White Lead 
into our "ANCHOR" Liquid Paint we knew we were doing the one thing 
necessary to make it all a ready mixed paint should be, and to-day 
" ANCHOR " Liquid Paint stands alone on the top of the heap. 



HENDERSON & POTTS 



ESTABLISHED 
1874, 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE NEW SAVAGE REPEATER. 

There is no buyer more particular than 
the true sportsman and none more alert 
to recognize merit. For this reason there 
is a bright prospect for an active sale of 

Savage 25-35, 32-40 and 38-55 repealers 
this year. The new si/es are adapted to 
the famous Model 1899, which hitherto 
has been made in the 30-30 and ,303 
calibres only. All barrels of the Model 
L899 are of Savage smokeless steel, and 
the new high pressure loads may lie used 
with perfect safety to the'shooter. These 



tinnc further law proceedings. It is also 
understood that the building of the "shell" 
on the present foundations of the Morgan 

store will not In- carried out, only the 
company will utilize the land belonging to 
them around the building which has been 

used as public ground. An arcade to the 
height of the first store} will be built over 

this. It will be really an improvement to 
the building. 

LONDONDERRY IRON WORKS _ 

Rapid progress is being made in putting 
the plant of the Londonderry Iron Works 




high-power :i-2- K) and 38-55 are excellent 
big game loads. When a customer buys 
a Savage he will possess a firearm that 
will give the service expected. In other 
words, the rifle will be accurate and re- 
liable, and he will feel more than repaid 
for the money invested. A catalogue 
fully describing the complete line o( 
Savage rifle, ammunition, reloading tools, 
sights, etc., will be sent on request. Ad- 
dress Savage Arms Co., Utica, N.Y., and 
mention Canadian Hardware AND Metal 
Merchant. 



into shape for active operations. The old 
blast furnaces are now being relined and 
fitted up to produce pij»- iron, and by all 
appearances it will not be long before they 
are in working order. The company are 
now mining the ore, and relaying the 
tracks from the ore pits to the furnaces. 
Some old tunnels are being opened up. 
A visitor to the pipe works states that they 
already have made casts oi' pipes. 



THE MORGAN & CO. ASSESSMENT. 

A reduction of $50,000 in (he assessment 
of Henry Morgan & Co.'s property has 

been allowed by the city of Montreal, and 
instead of $500,000 it will now be $450,- 
000. This settles the difficulty for the 
present, and Morgan & Co. will discon- 



SHIPPING BOXES 

The Wire Woven Wood Mfg. Co., 01 
Richmond street, west, have found a sue 
cessfu] Held in making- shipping bo.v's. 
These consist of slats and wire, clossly 
woven and are made in a variety of sizes. 
Bakers and laundrymen have found these 
boxes so satisfactory that their orders 
alone have taxed to the utmost the pres- 
ent manufacturing capacity. New quar- 
ters have been proeiired and the output 
will be greatly increased to meet the 
growing demand. 



'■''... ".^ 

I 




Manufacturers of FINE READY-MIXED PAINTS 
FLOOR PAINTS and VARNISHES, and WHITE 
LEAD. Full line of best DRY COLORS, OILS, 
and all PAINTER REQUISITES always in stock, 
end for prices. 



The Globe Paint Co., 

Limited 

422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 




WINDOW GLASS. 



Our Spring Importations are now arriving, and carrying a very heavy 
stock, we are in a position to till all orders promptly. 

The Only HOUSE in CAN \i>.\ manufacturing and stocking every 
KIND OF (jl.Ass required for Building purposes. 

HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO., Limited 

LONDON, CANADA 




TO PRESERVE ail BEAUTIFY 



To meet the demand for a Varnish which 
will give a smoolh, hard finish, and enhance 
the beauty of the surface upon which it is 
applied and for general purposes, we intro- 
duced the Universal "Sun" Varnish. The 
" Sun " met with a good reception fiom the 
start, and we again have to repeat the order 
for " Sun " Cabinets. It is a hard copal Var- 
nish, made only by ourselves from selected 
clear bright gum, and is thoroughly matured 
and tested before being passed into stock for 
shipment. It is suitable for all purposes 
where Varnish is used, 
inside or outside. 

The " Sun " Varnish 
may be applied with 
every satisfaction to out- 
side doors, boats.buggies, 
wagons, and where dur- 
ability is required. 

For interior work the 
" Sun " is especially valu- 
able for furniture, church 
seats, inside blinds, bath 
rooms, oilcloth, etc., etc. A floor varnished 
with " Sun " Varnish is sweet and wholesome. 

The "Sun" Varnish is brought to such a 
state of perfection that it may be used with 
the greatest confidence. 

The " Sun " is put up in half pints, pints, 
quarts, half gallons, gallons. (Imperial 
measure.) 

Directions for use upon every package. 

Beware or Imitations. 

"Sun" Varnish is sold in sea'ed cans 
ONLY, never in bulk, and the trade mark 
" Sun " is registered. 



"I Will 

have the 

Sun. or I 

will have 

none." 



For Sale by Hardware and 

Paint Merchants 

Everywhere. 



SOLE MAKERS 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 



37 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE WALL PAPER TRADE 



CATERING TO CHEAP TRADE. 

I difficult t>> give advice on a sub 

; like tins, for the average nier- 
nnt knows he must carry the cheap 
Where he errs, however, is in the 
immense range he is willing to cany in 
lines that retail ui 5c. or thereabouts, 
while iu his highei priced goods he fears 
lo cany much lest it will remain on his 
hands. If he would sit down and think 
out which customer means more to him, 
the o cent or the Id cent, and which de- 
the most attention, he would come 
to the conclusion that he is doing the 
better class of customers an injustice in 
in>i affording them variety, wiule for the 
chea,JJ class, where pattern should not be 
of such great importance, he carries al- 
most innumerable designs. 

1'hat is the reason why so much of the 
latter trade comes to the city. If a 
Inner is willing to put 15c. into a roll of 
paper he rightly considers that to him 
is due greater attention than to the 
cheap man. How can a merchant expect 
to sell good grades unless he carries a 
lair slock to select from V He should 
not pass an opinion on the demand for 
good wall papers until he has carried 
variety enough to supply those wishing 
that class of goods. 

He not only loses his good customers, 
but also good sales to other customers 
who would buy the more expensive lines 
if a sufficient assortment were displayed, 
but who, upon seeing such a vast choice 
iu cheap grades do not think of going 
above it. When a person buys a 15c. 
wall paper he is not buying a 5c. grade 
of paper and colors with a 15c. pattern ; 
he is getting a better paper in more en- 
during colors and with better designs. 
A 16c. paper will outwear five 5c. papers 
and always look well. The fading of 
cheap paper is the principal cause for 
g'ttiiig a new wall covering, but in the 
better grades this fading- does not occur, 
and the wall paper need be changed only 
when tired of, or, by some special cause, 
soiled. 

Host of our expansive paper is impor- 
ted and carried only in the cities or 
large towns, whereas if a taste and de- 
mand for it were encouraged in the 
smaller towns and villages by the local 
dealers, our own manufacturers would 
.....ii -. . sity of supplying Can- 

adian trade in these expensive lines. We 
cannot expect our mills to manufacture 
a claec of paper for which there is little 
demand, for sentiment does not run a 
busim 



Let merchants cany better lin<'s ; let 
them learn and tell the advantages of 
expensive wall papers; let them push 
that grade and keep bark the cheap 
lines, and it would not be long before 
our swellesf wall paper stores would dis- 
play the card '' Made in Canada." 

WHAT THE STORES ARE SELLING. 

NEVER before has the variety of pat- 
tern and color in wall paper been 
seen that is shown this spring. 
As a rule, the patterns are less conspic- 
uous than ever, and it is only for certain 
rooms that the loud and prominent 
bunches of flowers of other seasons are 
displayed. Stripes are a prominent 
feature, both in somewhat contrasted 
colors and in self tones. The stripe pat- 
tern is so usual for certain rooms, that 
it is always popular. 

The " art nouveau" designs are the 
best sellers in the higher priced papers, 
and the effects in this style are most 
beautiful. Long stems, with sweeping 
curves and irregular bends, are crowned 
by medium sized and small flowers in 
somewhat conventional designs, and these 
spots of pattern occur at great distances 
from each other. In the intervals, in- 
conspicuous designs of self colors break 
the stretch of clear space, without ex- 
hibiting a mass of confused pattern. 

Tapestry paper has a prominent posi- 
tion in the list and is selling as never 
before. One of its conveniences is its 
adaptability to the coloring of any ad- 
jacent room. 

In colors, delicate shades abound in 
blue, green and pink. Deep reds as a 
background are not so much in favor, 
but rose color and fairly dark shades are 
made still darker by a deep red pattern. 
Self tones are the neatest and daintiest 
of the season's offerings, and are selling 
as their merits deserve. 

Some special United States papers are 
in Japanese goods in red with designs of 
•Japs, storks, and such like novelties. A 
summer paper has bunches of goldenrod 
in large clusters with intervening small 
clusters of purple asters. Some land- 
scape papers are printed with games of 
golf or baseball and groups of tall trees. 
In nursery papers, landscapes, games and 
illustrated nursery rhymes appear. These 
are supposed to be, and no doubt are, 
educative. 

New York and Boston have done com 
paratively little in the exportation of 

grain this season. Sil the opening of 

navigation, the port of Montreal has ex- 
ported fully 7. nun. nun bushels, principally 
Manitoba wheat. 

38 



TO START A BALKY HORSE. 

AIM VAT. for David Hnrum, at least 
as regards knowledge of horses, 

has been discovered by The Horse 
shoers' Journal. This genus has a 

guaranteed cure for balky horses, which 

he claims will start the horse. " Mo mat 
i.r how bad he is, let me tell you how 
to start him 99 times out of 100. Of 
course, it may fail one time out of a 
hundred. When a horse balks, no mailer 
how badly he sulks or how ugly he is, 
do not beat him ; don't throw sand in 
Ins ears ; don't use a rope on his fore 
legs, or even burn straw under him. 
Quietly go and pat him on the head a 
moment ; take a hammer or even pick 
up a stone in the street ; tell the driver 
to sit still ; take his lines, hold them 
quietly, while you lift up either front 
foot ; .jive each nail a light tap and a 
good smart tap on the frog ; drop the 
foot quickly, and then chirp to him to 
go on. In 99 cases out of 100 the horse 
will go right on about his business, but 
the driver must keep his lines taut and 
not pull or jerk him back. If I have 
tried this once I have tried it 500 times, 
and every time I have suggested it peo- 
ple have laughed and even bet 15 and 
bottles of wine that I could not do it. 
So far I have won every bet. This may 
make you smile, but a horse has more 
common sense than most people are 
willing to give him credit for. The 
secret of this little trick is simply diver 
sion. I am a firm believer that with 
kindness and proper treatment a horse 
can be driven with a string." 

If your delivery horse is inclined to 
balk try this on him. 



ATTRACTIVE PACKAGE GOODS. 

Attractive packages have a great deal 
to do in the sale of goods, and The 
I nil..! Factories, Ltd., seem to appreci- 
ate this fact as they arc now placing all 
their better lines of Boeckh's and Bryan's 
scrubbing brushes, dandy brushes, ban- 
nister brushes, hair brooms and whisks 
in neat cardboard cartoons. These car- 
toons not only add materially to the 
appearance of the goods, but they also 
protect them and keep them from becom- 
ing shop worn and are much more easily 
handled. We feel quite certain that this 
move on the part of The United Fac 
tories, Ltd., will be appreciated by both 
the dealer and consumer and will add 
greatly to the popularity of their lines. 



Helps towards Sanitation 

The Cleveland Wall Paper Cleaner a 
paste, n. .1 a Liquid cleanses ul.l walls thoroughly, 
Makes Bmoked and dust-covered vails fresh as when 
tiisi papered, Retails at ZSo. 

Samples sent tor distribution with your order. 

GEO. RIDOUT & CO., 

77 York St., Toronto. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




WALL PAPER, 

MJINUEACTUFZEI\S 



°" r c °»<piet e 
S *°™» to the T liMe of e 

s > at pric es t» ' ne *>, at* 

o« for, Uer <°°«y nhether 

See " the ~77^~~^2£ty2ur or , 

and you'ii 

ll not 







FORMERLY M.STAUNTON & CO. 



94 




H*rdw*rc- and 




THE NATIONAL MASTER PLUMBERS' ASSOCIATION 

CONVENTION. 



AS customary before the annual conven- 
tions of the National Association of 
Master Plumbers and Steam- Fitters 
of Canada, a meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee was held before the convention. The 
committee was called to order at 10 a.m. 
Wednesday, July 1, by President Frank 
Powers at the Foresters' Hall, 505 Craig 
street, Montreal. 

On opening the meeting, the president 
referred to the absence of G. A. Perrier, the 
secretary, who was detained through the 
recent death of his mother and the illness of 
his wife. In the absence of the secretary, 
J. Pascoe Bell was requested to act pro 
tern, and the president called for the first 
order of business, which was roll call. The 
following responded to theii names: 

President— F. Powers, Lunenburg, N.S. 

Past President — John McKinley, Ottawa. 

Vice-President — P. C. Ogilvie, Montreal. 

Treasurer — Jos. Lamarche, Montreal. 

Secretary — J. Pascoe Beel, pro tem. 

Vice-President for Ontario — W. H. Meredith, 
Toronto. 

Vice-President for Quebec— M. Thibeau, Mont- 
real, pro tem. 

Vice-President for New Brunswick — Wm. Wat- 
son, Moncton. 

Vice-President for Nova Scotia — Geo. Kinsman, 
Halifax, pro tem. 

Vice-President for Cape Breton — J. D.Chisholm, 
New Glasgow. 

Vice-President for British Colombia — H. Ma- 
honey. Guelph. • 

Vice-President for Manitoba — R. Ross, Toronto, 
pro tem. 

After roll call the minutes of the Execu- 
tive for the year were read and adopted. 
When the officers' reports were read, Presi- 
dent Powers presented a ver\- encouraging 
report and one full of hope for the future, 
many suggested reforms being offered. The 
other officers presented the work done bv 
them during the year. 

After the reading of these reports it was 
decided to take up the president's report, 
clause by clause. It was felt that some of the 
suggested reforms should be referred to the 
committees to report at an early session of 
the convention proper. That in reference 
to a permanent secretary was referred to a 
committee composed of W. II. Meredith, 
K. Koss. Joseph Lamarche, II. Mahoney, 
and P. C. Ogilvie. The clause in reference 
to amendments to Halifax resolutions and 
means whereby same can be effectually 
enforced was referred to J. McKinley, 
J. Thibean, J. I). Chisholm and W. Watson, 
while the clause in reference to best ways 
and means to obtain Dominion legislation 
along sanitary lines was referred to H. A. 
Knox, Geo. Kinsman, and L. Le Grow. 



A very profitable discussion arose along 
the lines of trade relationships, and it was 
learned that as a whole there was a fair 
understanding between the manufacturers 
and master plumbers. 

A motion was made expressing deep 
sympathy with the secretary in his sad 
bereavement. The committee adjourned 
to meet at 7-80 p.m. 

DELEGATES ENJOY THEMSELVES. 

It will be seen -by referring to the pro- 
gramme that the convention proper did not 
open until 8 p.m. Wednesday. After lunch 
the delegates went to see the lacrosse 
match between the "Shamrocks," of 
Montreal, and the "Brants," of Brantford, 
for the " Minto Cup," which carries 
with it the championship of the world. 
After an exceedingly clean and well play- 
ed match, the Shamrocks were declared the 
winners, by the close score of 5 to 4. How 
ever, this does not decide the championship, 
and the teams meet again on Saturday, 
July 4th. The most games in the two 
matches count. The captain of the Sham- 
rock team is the president of the Montreal 
Master Plumbers' Association, T. O'Con- 
nell. The sympathies of the delegates 
were about evenly divided Among the 
delegates who have arrived, besides those 
mentioned as composing the Executive 
Committee, were noticed : 

D. J. Shea, Fredericton. N. B. 

Geo. Ross, Brockville, Ont. 

W. G. Butler, Perth, Ont. 

Geo. A. Wootten, Halifax, N. S. 

Frank Maxwell, L. Legrow, Geo. Cooper and 
F. Armstrong, Toronto. 

H. A. Knox and ]. G. Johnstone, Ottawa. 
Representatives of the supply houses 
who have arrived are: 

Peter McMichae', manager of The Dominion 
Radiator Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Geo. F. Clare, of The Jas. Robertson Co., Limit- 
ed, Toronto. 

W. N. Forbes, representing Wm. Stairs, Son & 
Morrow, Limited, Halifax, N. S. 

The manufacturers and supply houses of 
Montreal are fully determined that the dele- 
gates shall be well looked after while in the 
city. The convention, which opened at 8 
p. m., Wednesday, July 1st, 1903, promises 
to be one of the most successful ever held 
by the National. 

It was decided to hold the next anunal 
convention of the association in Toronto. 



passed such a by-law. In many respects 
it follows in the line of the Toron- 
to by - law. We notice that no vent- 
pipe of less than 4 inches in diameter 
shall pass through the roof. All pipes must 
extend at least three feet above the roof, 
and must be ten feet from any opening. 
The breather pipe attachment must be put 
in with the usual proviso — keep it away as 
far as possible from all openings into the 
house. I 7 or every final inspection and cer- 
tificate granted under the by-law, a fee of 
$1.00 is charged, which mast be paid in ad- 
vance at the time of filing notice for inspec- 
tion. The by-law does not apply to work 
contracted for previous to the passing there- 
of. M. M. O'Connell was appointed plumb- 
ing inspector, to work under the direction 
of the medical health officer. 



OTTAWA CITY PLUMBING BY-LAW 

The Council of the city of Ottawa, who 
have for some time debated the legality of 
enacting a municipal by-law governing the 
plumbing trade, have at last framed and 

40 



PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES. 

NOW that the fame of the Toronto 
Master Plumbers' Baseball Team is 
known, challenges are coming in 
fast. On Saturday, July 4, they meet a 
team from the Journeymen's Association, 
and on Saturday, July 11, they meet the 
Manufacturers and Supply Men. The 
worthy secretary, Geo. Clapperton, states 
that he can't allow his team to play two 
Saturdays running. ' Some of them have 
seen younger days. 

H. Mahony, Guelph, Ont., was in Toronto 
on Monday of this week. He reports 
trade brisk in Guelph. Mr. Mahony was 
on his way to attend the convention in 
Montreal. He is the National vice-presi- 
dent for British Columbia. 

The marriage of Thomas Moore, plumber 
of The Light, Heat and Power Co., King- 
ston, Ont., and Miss S. Ludlow, was cele- 
brated recently. 

The new building of The Canadian Heat- 
ing and Ventilating Company, Ltd., Owen 
Sound, Ont., is progressing favorably. 

Donald Sinclair, hardware dealer, 
plumber, tinsmith, etc., Paris, Ont., is 
looking for a tinsmith and plumber. He 
is ready to pay good wages to a good man. 

The many friends of Mr. Geo. Perrier, of 
Crump & Perrier, Halifax, secretary of the 
National Association of Master Plumbers, 
will regret to learn of the death of his 
mother, Mrs. Jane Pierier, widow of George 
Perrier, Sr., which took place on June 17th. 
Mrs. Perrier was well-known and very 
highly esteemed for her acts of kindness 
and her noble qualities. Her loss will be 
severely felt. Mrs. Perrier resided with her 
son George at 115 Dresden Row, from 
which address the funeral took place on 
Friday afternoon, June 10th. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



VARN-OFF 



A NEW LINE FOR 
THE PAINT AND 
OIL TRADE. 



Varn-off takes varnish off, and it takes 
paint off, and it does it all so quickly 
and with so little trouble that every- 
body is surprised. It's a line for every 
paint trade because it is always wanted ; 
and if you have it you have something 
that pays you. . We will mail you a 
sample for the asking. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



'S 



fi 




M 



Clipper. 



PATENTED 1874. 



The King of 
Centre-Adjustment 

Clippers 

still remains 

unsurpassed 

after a run of nearly 

THIRTY YEARS 




The Improved 

B. PATTERN 

"PMIIET" 

may now be obtained 
from all jobbers. 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with 
Long Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy 
Running. 

Accurately Machined 
and Perfeotly Fitted. 

All Parts Interchangeable. 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BURMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

BIRMINGHAM, E NGLAND 



Mammocks 




A post card will bring you our prices 
on Croquet Sets, Hammocks, Baseball, 
Tennis Goods, Toy Garden Tools, 
Paper Lanterns, Flags, etc. 

Nerlich & Co. 

146-148 FRONT ST. WEST, Tomn + n 

(Opposite Union Station) I Ul ij I I L V-l . 



The New Century Bail-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 



iHoMt* 010 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tuliful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L. HAt.DIMAND & SON, Montreal, 



L.mitod. 
Eastern Aprents. 



■U 



Hardware and 
Met.l 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



THE STANDARD IDEAL SANITARY CO. 



\ S in practically every branch of 
Y industry in I'iuiiu! th< past hall 
dozen yean has witnessed a re 
markable development in the demand for 
plumbing fixtures of all kinds. The 
d result lias been that the atli-n 
liun of thi- ever-alert Ajnerican plumbing 
imii has been attracted to this country 
i Geld lor their enterprise. 

Among those interested were the pro- 
moters ami organizers of The Standard 
Ideal San i tar) Co., who. alter a thor- 
ough survej of tln> Geld, decided to en 
talilish works at Port Hope. (Int. The 
ress of these works has hern reported 
from time to time in " Hardware and 
Metal," so our readers air acquainted 
with thf enterprising manner in which 
the> have proceeded with their organize 
tion work. 

Their building operations began only 
on March I. and now a handsome brick 
structure occupies a commanding position 
near tin- mouth of the harbor, with the 
water and the railroad on each side of it. 

Finished wares, including bathtubs, 
wire turned out last week. 

Tin' main building, a solid brick struc 
tare, is 250x90 feet. This includes a 
molding -hop 125x90 feet, and a larger 
two storey cleaning and storage room. 
Adjoining an- two wings, one 50 x Inn 
feet, containing the enameling rooms, 
and the other, the smelting, and engine 
and boiler rooms. The plant is of the 
very latest and most economical design, 
and is equipped with the most approved 
appliances. 

The molding shop contains a No. 60 
Newton cupola, of ID tons per hour 
capacity, served by a pneumatic hoist 
for charging with iron and coke. Tra 
veiling pneumatic cranes, which will pick 
up anything under 2,500 pounds, handle 
tin- ml) llasks and large castings in the 
molding shop with the greatest facility. 
Power is supplied by an 80-h.p. Robb 
& Armstrong engine, driven by a Inn 
h.p. Leonard boiler. The latter is 

equipped by an induced draft system. 
which utilize- all the waste heat from 
the enameling furnace-, and, at the same 
lime, consumes all the smoke. In the 
engine-room also are located a low- 
pressure air compressor. for the sand 
lilast in the cleaning room : a hii/h pres- 
sure compressor for the air jacks and 
other pneumatic tools, and a large fan. 
which generates tie' blast for the cupola 
The enameling section of the works is 
furnished with large enamel mills and 
capacious muffle firing furnaces. These 
open on the enameling room, in which is 
installed a crane system for charging and 
unnlling tie- turns 

I he company is incorporated with a 
capitul of $100,(1 mi. all the stock - 



held by Detroit and Cleveland capitalist-. 

The president and manager, II. P. 
Bush, who as manager of The Ideal 
Manufacturing Co., of Detroit. Mien.. 
Iniilt up thi' splendid business of that 
linn in Detroit and Walkeiw ille. (Int.. is 
thoroughly conversant with the latest 
processes . and impresses one as a 
hustler. He ha- associated with him on 
the executive S. V Sloman, vice-presi 
dent : -I. It. Sprankle, secretary treasurer, 
and A. E. Pipher, superintendent. 

The company have located in Don 
Hope to manufacture porcelain enameled 
ware, bath tubs, sinks, etc., also soil 
pipe and -oil pipe fittings, for Canadian 
and export trade. A staff of experienced 
workmen have been brought with ti.cm, 
some of whom have been in he business 
for IT years. The majority of the waies 

made, including the soil pipe and fittings, 

will be manufactured by machinery under 
patents owned by the company, a lea 
ture which will make them a strong fac- 
tor in the trade. 

ENGLISH ENGINEERS' CONVENTION. 

TIN', annual summer meeting of the 
Institution of Heating and Venti- 
lating Engineers, of England, was 
held in Nottingham, on Tuesday and 
Wednesday, dune Hi and 17. Louis F. 
Pearson presided. In welcoming the 
delegates he warmly thanked the press 
for the valuable assistance rendered, and 
particularly for the publicity generously 
given to the scheme of prizes arranged 
for the assistants. It is a feature of the 
institution to offer prizes to their em- 
ployes for thi' best prepared papers of 
interest to the trade. A great number of 
new members were elected. Two valu- 
able papers on heating were read and 
discussed ; valuable criticism, data and 
suggestions were offered. 

A pleasing feature of the meeting was 
the presentation of the two medals' of- 
fered for the two best papers read. Sam 
Nay lor was the recipient of the silver 
medal, and Walter Nates, of the bronze 
medal. Mr. Naylor's paper was on 

Low Pressure Steam Heating," and 
that of Mr. Nates on " Mechanical Venti- 
lation." The delegates and their ladies 
were given a trip to the historic Notting- 
ham Castle. and a tram car ride to 
i'erry'.- lace factory, known as the Boule 
vard Works. Radford Boulevard. This 
trip wa- greatly enjoyed, especially by 
the ladies. A successful n ting was ad- 
journed, to meet in London. October li. 

The president announced that three 
prizes, one of three guineas, one of two 
guineas, and one of one guinea, were 
offered to assistants for the three best 
essays on a subject chosen by the com 
petitor himself. provided it refers to 

42 



aspect of heating or ventilation. 
This is only the forerunner of similar 

prizes that will be offered, providing m 

terest is taken in the competition. 
This effort of the heating and ventila 

tine engineers to create an interest 
amongst their assistants should be 

heartily endorsed, and other trades would 
do well to follow the example. The as 
sistant of today is the journeyman and 
employer of tomorrow, and should re 
ceive every encouragement to thoroughly 
ht himself for the increased responsibility 

that will be his. 



BUILDING NOTES. 

ANEW brick and stone block, to cost in 
neighborhood of $12,000, is to be 
erected on Carrall street, Vancouver, B.C. 
The contract for the erection of the new 
block has been let to R. P. Forshaw and 
operations will be commenced at once 

The G.T.R. has decided to build a new 
station at Milton, Ont. 

McLachlan & Ellis are erecting an eleva- 
tor at Indian Head, N.W.T. 

William Newlands, architect, is preparing 
plans for a large three storey stone and 
metal warehouse, for W. J. Clothers, King- 
ston, Ont. 

A business block to cost $12,000 is to be 
erected in Walkerville, Ont., by Chas. 
Chilvers. 

R. J. Disney, of Hanover, Ont., is 
arranging to build a furniture factory at 
Collingwood. 

A $4,500 residence is being erected on 
Ouellette avenue, in Windsor, by Miss 
Pauline Greisinger. 

Munro & Co., Renfrew, Ont., have the 
contract for new shops, roundhouse and 
turntable for the C.P.R. at North Bay. 

Work has been commenced on the founda- 
tion of the works being erected in Hull, 
Que., by The Portland Cement Co. 

Rain has delayed building operations on 
the new building being erected in Hamilton, 
Ont., by The International Harvester Co. 

In view of the enormous crop prospects in 
the west, the Canadian Northern Railway 
are going to construct two new elevators, 
of modern type, at Port Arthur, a storage 
elevator 'with a capacity of 3,500,000 
bushels and, a shipping elevator with a 
capacity of 1,500,000 bushels. 

The Daily Sun, St. John, N.B., says that 
never since the time of the great fire in that 
city has the building trade been so brisk ; 
that all lines of craftsmen are rushed with 
work, and the supply of competent artisans 
is far below the demand; and that this 
summer and fall plumbers will have their 
hands full of work. 



Saunders & llorton, Goderich, have pur- 
chased the Brampton Gas Works, Bramp- 
ton, and contemplate the improvement o 
premises and works. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"SHIELD BRAND" SHEATHING 

TARRED or DRV. 

For Lining — Houses, Hams and Stables. Extra strong, full weight, best quality. When ordering from your 
dealer demand the " Shield Brand." It's a quick seller. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY- 



Lockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal 



Bell Telephone Main 1G89. 



iv&ymfmmv&^miv&w'mvstoimvssimim 




STEEL RAILS 

We offer 60 pound A.S.C.E. Standard section steel rails and angles, the product of 

The Alooiiiti Steel Company, Limited 
for prompt shipment from Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. 



Offices i 

Canada Life Building, Montreal. 
93 Yorh Street. Toronto. 



Drummond, McCall & Co., 

GENERAL SALES AGENTS 

The Algoma Steel Company, Limited. 



LUXFER 
PRISMS... 



The secret of selling goods is 
to KNOW what a man wants. 



You WANTaGOOD, LIGHT STORE 



We KNOW it and can make 
it so for you. 



Do Not be Misled by Cheap Imitations. 



We can give you cheap glass. 
We will give you big value 
for every dollar invested in... 

LUXFER PRISMS. 

DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO. 



LIMITED 



100 King St. West, TORONTO. 

Montreal Agency : F. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig St. 



FOR 



GLASS 

STORE 
FRONTS 



We make a specialty of all glass materials for 
the latest, most up-to-date 

STORE FRONTS AND 

INTERIOR DECORATION 



WILL SEND DESIGNS. 



DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO., 



LIMITED 



100 King Street West, TORONTO 

Montreal Agency: F. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig St. 



43 



H. 
M. 



rd w.iro ind 
lal 



Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



HOW THE CLERK IMPROVED THE STORE. 



"I 



WAS down at the store yesterday 
when yon were out," said Mrs. Nico- 
demtu Brown to Mr. Nicodemus 
Brown, a small but semi-successful hard- 
ware merchant, as he finished his breakfast 
coffee, "and I made a discovery that you 
have not made in all the years that you 
have been in business." 

And what was that, my dear?" asked 
Mr. Brown. lie had ceased some years ago 
to make light of his wife's business notions. 
He had done so at first, until she had, on 
several occasions, taken a fall out of him. 
So he reserved judgment and asked, care- 
lessly, "A discovery, eh! And what might 
that be, Mrs. Brown?" § 

"You need a new clerk," was the answer. 

Mr. Brown gave a sigh of relief. He was 
on his own ground, and the fear of his wife 
deserted him. "A new clerk ? Well, I guess 
not. It keeps me busy now in finding 
enough for Thomas to do. If I had another 
young man on my hands, I'd have to buy a 
chess board to keep them both busy." And 
he folded up his newspaper and reached for 
his overcoat, with a satisfied air of finality. 

" Yes, that you need a new clerk," contin- 
ued the wife, as though there had been no 
response. "So I have engaged one, who 
will report at 8'clock to-morrow morning." 

" You— have — engaged— one !" repeated 
Mr. Brown, as he turned about with an air 
of amazement. He was a good little man, 
but the bristles began to rise with anger. 
" 1 like that. Why don't you come down 
and run the store ? You can find an old 
pair of trousers up stairs, if you have made 
up your mind to wear them." 

" You need not worry about it," said Mrs. 
Brown, as she went over and kissed him 
good-bye. "Just run along now, and don't 
ask me any more. I won't tell you a word 
about it. But I'll come along and do the 
introducing myself." 

Mr. Brown asked no questions, either on 
that night or the following morning. He 
reached the store at 7.30, and kept his eyes 
on the door. " Thomas," he said to his 
clerk, "when my wife was in here the other 
day, did she make any special remarks?" 

" Not that I heard," said Thomas. "She 
just went snooping around, and I heard 
her sniff once or twice as though there was 
something she didn't like." 

" Yes." said Mr. Brown with a sigh. " I 
have heard her sniff that way before.' 
And still he kept an eye on the door. 

The door opened. In came Mrs. Brown. 
Behind her walked the joy and treasure of 
the Brown kitchen, Mary Ann. 



Mrs Brown threw off her cloak. Beneath 
it was that suit which Mr. Brown knew 
too well — the suit that meant house-clean- 
ing, soapsuds, the exploring of corners for 
dirt, the dumping of things into the ash- 
can. There was also another thing Mr. 
Brown had seen before — a look in her eye 
that she reserved for certain moments of 
resistless determination. 

"Good morning, gentlemen," said Mrs. 
Brown with a stately bow, "permit me the 
honor of introducing the new clerk, Mary 
Ann McGonigal." 

"The top of the morning to yez," said 
that lady, without the stately bow. "Tom, 
me boy, can yez scare up a lot of hot 
water?" 

Tom scared up a gallon of it, and kept 
scaring more up as it was needed. It was 
a wet day, and little doing. Mary Ann 
gave her orders. Mr. Brown was to wait 
on customers. " I need Thomas for me 
errand boy," she explained. So he put on 
his old suit and was kept on the jump. 

They began on the second floor. Cob- 
webs and ceiling dust were swept down. All 
the nooks and crannies under shelves were 
swept out. Tom was kept for two hours 
moving boxes and barrels. The floor was 
swept as it never had been before. 
Mary Ann washed the two front windows, 
inside and out, while she made Tom wash 
the two in the rear. Then the floor was 
scrubbed. All this time Mrs. Brown was 
moving things on the shelves and dusting 
them. Bundling up old pieces of paper and 
waste and stuffing them into a bag for the 
rag man ; and even' few minutes she came 
across some broken, rusted or discarded 
article, which Mr. Brown would look at 
with a puzzled air when he came up stairs 
and sa3' "1 don't think I ever saw that 
before." It ma}' be added here, that the 
next day he had one hundred and ten of 
these odds and ends of useless things on a 
bargain counter, and sold them all off 
eventually, at an average of twenty-five 
cents each. 

It took two days of labor before the 
ground floor was as clean as Mrs. Brown 
desired. When the show windows were 
washed, Mrs. Brown and Tom dressed 
them as they had never been before. The 
clerk was enthusiastic. "If you could give 
us one hour a week," he said, "we will 
keep them as pretty as any window on the 
street." 

" I'll do it, never fear," she said. " I have 
got interested now, and you can never lose 
me." 

II 



Mr. Brown looked the whole store over 
when it was set in shape, and saw that it 
was good work that had been done. To 
Mary Ann he said, it's a new bonnet you get 
for this." 

To his wife he said, " You were right, 
Amelia. We needed a new clerk, and you 
found her. But to tell the truth, I never 
knew before how slovenly and how dirty 
things were down here." 

"No," said his wife, "but every woman 
who came in, and most of the men, knew 
the moment they entered here. Just see 
that you keep it so." 

"I will." 

He is as good as his word. If things ever 
begin to look slack, his wife has only to 
look round and say, "Do you need another 
dose of Mary Ann?" — Hardware Dealers' 
Magazine. 

Builders' Hardware Display. 

The Canada Hardware Co. continue to 
improve their already modern and hand- 
some sample rooms. The latest addition is 
now being built, in the shape of a case for 
builders' hardware. This is near to the en- 
trance of the warehouse on De Bresoles 
street, and when completed will be a notice- 
able feature of the hardware display. It 
will also be a novelty in hardware houses, 
and a device entirely different from anything 
else in use. 

An Accidental Display. 

"In November, 1901, says a shrewd re- 
tailer, "I received a small consignment of a 
cheaper quality of skates and with them 
were a few price lists tied in a bundle. Hav- 
ing no convenient place to stow them away 
at the time of unpacking, 1 stacked them in 
one corner of the window and tossed the 
package of price lists among them. The 
same happened to fall with the printed side 
out against the window. Very much to 
my surprise, I commenced having custom- 
ers for those skates right away. At first I 
could not account for the sudden influx of 
skate-trade, having always kept skates in 
stock before, too, but finally I happened to 
notice a number of boys and girls stopping 
in front of the window, no doubt attracted 
there by the display of skates. The parents 
of these children, accompanied by the child- 
ren themselves, were my best skate custom- 
ers, and so it was comparatively easy to 
reason through the mystery. This taught 
me to pay more attention to my show win- 
dow than I had in the past and I at once 
commenced to display goods to good advan- 
tage, but even then I did not change the 
display oftener than once a month and 
sometimes once in two months." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Portland Cements 

BEST 

German, Belgian and English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, 
Drain Pipes, 
Hard Wall Plaster. 
Calcined Plaster, 
Wheelbarrows, 
Mortar Stains. 



A FULL STOCK OF 



BUILDERS' and CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 

W.McNALLY&CO. 

40 to 52 McGill Street, 

Corner Wellington St., 

MONTREAL 

Write for oar quotations. 



Any Firm in Canada 

Installing a plant in which 

COPPER and 
BRASS 

enter to any extent should 
certainly confer with us. 

THE BOOTH COPPER CO., 



119-123 Queen St.. East 
TORONTO. 



Limited 




BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, etc. 



4fl£ 



ALEX. BREMNER, & :a Montreal, One. 




NO RETAILER CAN AFFORD TO 

BE WITHOUT OUR LINE OF 



ire: 



RIVliS 



YOUR JOBBER CAN SUPPLY OUR LINE. SEND FOR OUR LATEST CATALOGUES. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO., Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Cun Made 





Vollmar Kssr - Washer 

It has a most enviable record. A perfection of its kind 
— will wash more clothes in less time, do it better and 
easier, with less wear and tear, than any other machine. 
Trices on application. 

Coubornb. B«pt 10th, 1908, 
Messrs. WORTMANA Ward Mfi:. Co., LONDON, 

Dear SIR3,— We have used the washer again and And that further use 
increased its value to us The girls are simply delighted with it, as they can 
do the trashing and l»e presentable tor callers it need be, 

UBS. I! WEEKS 
The above is a sample of the many kind words said about the Vollma 

i street No. when addressing vis.) 

The Wortman & Ward Mfg. Co,, Limited 

No. 1500 William Street, London, Ont. 



..^^+^++++4++++++++ +++++++++ +++ ♦ ♦ ♦ 



4 
+ 






GENERAL HARDWARE! 

t Window Glass, Rope, Wire, 

| Seasonable Goods, Ice Cream Freezers, etc, | 

t Green Wire Cloth, Spring Hinges. i 

I ALEXANDER MACPHERSON & SON, - 



- MONTREAL : 



45 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Heating System 
The Public Wants. 

Advertising is a necessity in present day business. We, who are known throughout Canada in connection with the highest 
efficiency in cooking and beating apparatus, use it and appreciate its business bringing power. We have just prepared a series 
of advertisements on home heating and how efficiently it is done with the 

Oxford Hot Water Heater 

and 

Oxford Radiators. 

We are educating the public to the hot water system, of home heating. Every householder is gathering the points of superiority 
of the Oxford Heating System, and when they decide to install that is the system they will insist on. We are sending these 
customers to you. Treat them right when they come by giving them what they want— the best. 

Si GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., u^T^5 

TORONTO, CANADA, 
WINNIPEG, VANCOUVER. 

TI1E GLJRNEY-MASSEY CO., Limited, 385-387 St. Paul Street, - MONTREAL. 

*♦ + + *. ♦♦ + ♦ + ♦♦♦♦ + ♦ + ♦ ** + + + + +++ + >-++>^++++++4 






♦ 

: 



♦ 



♦ 

: 

f 
f 

♦ 



MADE IN CANADA 




No. 175. s Steel -Ebony finish. 



Hot Plates 



I BURNER 

2 BURNERS 

3 BURNERS 



k 



Jewel Gas Ranges 

Experience has proved that Jewel Gas Ranges are not only more 
economical, but are more strongly built and better finished and have 
more genuine good features than any other line of Gas Ranges made. 

Jewel Gas Ranges are clean, and are more easily kept clean than any 
other kind. 

We make our own Valves, and the latest and best 1903 Jewel Needle 

Valve is supplied on all Ranges and Hot Plates. 

Improved Slotted ^=j~- 
Burners, with remov- 
able thimble caps, 
or Drilled Burners 
as required. 

Spring Balanced 
Drop Doors and 
Valves, Air Regula- 
tors, Front Supply 
Pipes, Door Plates 
and Spring Guards, 
Polished and Nickel- 
Plated. 



,L 



HAMILTON, ONT. 




No. 362 -With Pilot Light and three-section Reversible Burnq 
for Broiler— Asbestos Lined Oven, 



46 



hardware and 
Mt-tal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



THE MANAGEMENT OF A FOUNDRY. 



SOME valuable suggestions to foundry- 
men are given in the paper pub- 
lished below, which was read by 
David Spciur. of Chicago, 111., before the 
American Foundrymen's Association : 

" If a foundry foreman desires to keep 
his shop force up to a high state of 
efficiency lie will, as soon as lie receives 
an order for castings, see that the neces- 
sary cores are at once ordered from the 

core department. Then he will proceed 
to learn if he has a suitable llask for the 
cast inc. and if he has, he will ascertain 
if anv repair work is needed on this, and 
if so he will have this done before the 
flask is taken to the molders' floor. All 
repairing of tlasks should he done by a 
llask man instead of the n. older and his 
helper. Tn order that the molder may 
use his time to the best advantage, his 
helper should see that he not only has 
Facing; sand, gaggers' clamps, etc.. but he 
should also look after the many little 
things which the molder sometimes spends 

his high-priced time in looting up. Even 

in specialty shops T have seen molders 
take a hand in barring up flasks. This 
thev should not have to do. as this kind 
of labor belongs to the llask maker, and 
the latter will do a better job than the 
molder every time. 

" Tn a "Teat many foundries the men 
depend too much upon the foreman for 
everything. They should remember that 
he is only human, and has not the time 
to attend to every little detail. Tt has 
always seemed strange to me, too, that 
the place where castings arc made should 
receive SO little attention from the own- 
ers of plants, a majority of whom seem 
to believe that anything can be. made to 
do for this department. Perhaps nearly 
every practical foreman is familiar with 
shops where ordinary equipment is so 
scarce that the molders are spending a 
great part of their time looking for 
things of which each should have a plen 
tiful supply. The successful foundry 
manager of to-day must not only be a 
practical molder. but also experienced in 
cnoola practice or lie is not fully quali- 
fied for the position. Of course. lie 
should be a man of good judgment, cool 
and pleasant, and while he should treat 
his men in a liberal way, he should not 
be backward about taking a firm posi- 
tion whenever this becomes necessary. 

" A competent foundry manager is 



worth a good salary, and is sadly need 
cd by many foundries who are attempt 
ing to direct shop affairs from the office 
through men of small experience who are 
really not foremen at all. At the pre 
sent time we have another drawback in 
our foundries in the form of incompetent 

pattern making. I bave seen patterns 

come into a foundry made solid, where 
they should be split, and blank gears 
with hubs nailed on where these should 
be left loose. Again the foundry mana 
o-er has his hands full to handle the 
travelling class of molders, who generally 

come into a shop without a tool, and 

whenever they are ready to draw a pat 

tern, thev will look around for a nail to 
drive into it. and then break a clamp in 
two so that they may have a substitute 
for a hammer. 

" Naturally, the successful foundry 
manager will watch the little things and 
guard against waste as much as possible. 
A few years ago T took hold of a foun 
dry where I found 3ft tons of iron in the 
form of scrap buried in the ground. 1 
at once had this duo- up and dried and 
put through the rattler, when T used a 
few hundred pounds a day until it was all 
used up. Whenever owners of a foundry 
have a good foremen they should treat 
him right and give him to understand 
that they have confidence in him. When 
they furnish him what he requires to 
work with in the way of material and 
equipment, then, and not until their. 
have thev a<>t a right to look to him for 
results. There arc to (lav too many men 
acting in the capacity of superintendents 
of plants who should be llask men. arrd 
I have seen many a foreman who was 
more competent to be superintendent 
than the one who was placed over him. 
The young men of ability should be en 
couraged and promoted in every way. as 
it is to them we must look for- foundry 
managers in the future." 

DAVIDSON WORKS EXPANDING 

TTIK property of The Kohl. Mitchell 
Co.. Lkriited, (Montreal Brass 
Works), on Dominion street. Mont 
real, which was recently destroyed !>v 

fire, has been purchased by The Thos. 

Davidson Manufacturing Co. In the fall 
the work of rebuilding on the site will 
commence, and the offices of this com- 
pany will probably be removed there, 

47 



leaving additional room in the present 

premises for' the factory. 

The Davidson Company's buildings foi 
merlj occupied about two-thirds of the 

block in which the bra s works were 
situated, as well as the block north of it. 
between Albert street and the Grand 

I i link t rack- ; and the pu i ■ >| the 
Mitchell plant adds the remaining 30, 

Bqjuare f«et. The property now includes 
the two entire blocks, as the Davidson 

have already bollLfht the rest of the ]o| 
at the coiner of Albeit and Dominion 
streets, where formerly were a number of 
private houses. These buildings have now 
been torn down, and in their place the 
enamelling plant is being extended. The 
two blocks, which the plant, when com- 
pleted, will occupy', are bounded by De 
Lisle, Dominion and Vinet streets and 
the Grand Trunk tracks: Albert street 
running between the blocks. 

IRON MOLDERS' STRIKE. 

The iron molders employed in the 
foundry of -I. Rheaume, Mile End, Mont 
real, are on strike, their employers re- 
fusing to sion air agreement for the new 

scale of wages. Mr. -I. Rheaume state- 
that thev are willing to pay' the wages 
required, but decline to sion any agree 
merit with the officials of the union, 
riioy wish to deal with their employes 
only. 

CARE OF THE ROOFS. 

ATIMKI.Y talk on the .are of tin 
roofs by " Unfits, the Roofer," was 
published in The Arrow, the organ 
of The \. & G. Taylor Co.. Philadelphia, 
from which the extracts below are taken : 

There is one thine, you ought to 
know by now. and that is that you've 
gof to treat even good tin respectful 
like. I've seen some metal workers use 
a heavy coated terne plate in a way that 
would make a macadamized road shrink 
up. 

\\ hen your tin roof is down keep oil' 
it as much as possible. A tin roof is 
not a driveway for speeding steam 
shovels on. Neither is it a place to try 
hobnailed boots. 

Don't let the masons dump brick and 
mortar on it. or' the carpenters throw 
planks with nail- in them upon it that 
is. if you want a good tin roof. 

You've got to use a roof as well as 
a tin toot" should be used if you want a 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I. ii>> niattei what tin you put 

up. mi it I'll.- man that pxpei t - .1 tin 

thing that comes along 

in tin ■ igh usuage while the 

in would use a crand 

to keep In- 1 otatoes in. ;\n<l then 

1 ul>\ it did not sound well. 

tter the tin the better care you 
should [rive it putting it on. 

" \ b roofing paper should go under 

tin. I se the best Bolder 3 ou ■ an 

L nd paint the tin as soon as it is 

laid. It doesn't do any tin good to 

paint the nist that has settled on it 

over in-lit. 

•• \oii want to do all of these things, 
but you want to be sure first that volu- 
tin 1- Taj lor Old Stj le." 



TROUBLES CAUSED BY CHIMNEYS. 

1\ many cases the stove or range is 
condemned for troubles which ema 

nate entirely from defects in the 
chimneys. Some instances of this and 
the remedies are suggested by The 
Doherty Mfe. Co., Sarcia, Out., as fol 
lows : 

The chimney of the kitchen may be 
much lower at the top than the main 
part of the house. The wind blowing 
over the house falls like water over a 
■ lam. sometimes almost perpendicularly 
on the top of the chimney ; thus it beats 
down the smoke contained therein. The 
remedy is to build up the chimney, or 
add a smokestack to equal the height of 
the main hui UlintT- 

A building or a large tree may be near 
to and higher than the top of the chim- 
ney. s ( , that the wind passing over them 
would Idow down on the chimney. 

When there i- more than one opening 
iii a chimney. a great variety of compli- 
cations may affect the draft, so see that 
all the openings into the due, no matter 
what kind, excepting the one you are 
going to use, are securely closed. 

When two or more stoves are connec 
ted with one ~ i 1 1 L_ r I < • chimney, the combi- 
nation is so variable that it is difficult 
to cover all such cases by specific direc- 
tions. Common sense, directed by obser 
vation. must lie used. 

\ new or !_ r reeii chimney will never have 
a perfect draft. It will not draw perfect- 
ly until it is thoroughly dry, which 
Bometimet> requires two to four weeks' 
time. 

In building a ohimney, a little mortar 
may lie dropped from time to tine 
lodge out of sigl to partially 

close the chimney. \ heavy weight may 
he let down bj a rope and worked 
against the inside of the flue, to fie 
open 



In an old chimney the mortar max have 
crumbled from beneath the bricks, so ih.it 
it leaks air and spoils the draft. A (him 
M.-\ should always he smoothly plastered 

on tin' inside. 

\11 the air that passes through the 
chimney should first pass throUtfh the 
lire, unless Used (o check the (haft. 

USEFUL INFORMATION FOR 
ROOFERS 

THE Following table, issued by The 
I'aterson Mfg. Co., Limited. Tor- 
onto and Montreal. shows the 

average weight per 100 square feet of 

different grades of tarred roofing felt : 

1 iiirod Roofinc Fell weighs 11 lbs. to each nm Bq. ft" 

13 " " UK) " 

15 " " 100 

10-oz. " " " " 17 " " 100 

,._, 0/ .. .. .. ., ,<, .. .. ]||fl 

14-oz. '■ " " " 22 " " 100 

IB-OS. " " " " 25 " " 100 

" For a first class four plv roof SO lb. 
of pitch should he used to each 100 
square feet of surface to he covered, lnd 
if only three plies' of felt are put on. 70 
Ih. of pitch will be sufficient. For brush 
Iiili over the surface of the pitch before 
putting on the gravel, one gallon of re- 
fined coal tar is required for each square 

of 10 x 10 feet. 

A cubic yard of good clean gravel 
will cover about 700 square feet of roof. 
" A roofer's outfit, in addition to a 
hammer, axe. knife and saw, should con 
sist of a kettle sufficient] v large to Safely 
hold 1,000 lh. of pitch; three or four 
strong galvanized iron buckets ; a sheet 
iron dipper with a lone handle ; a 
Grooved pulley and strono- half-inch rope 
for hoisting the material ; a wooden 
scraper, shaped something like a hoe 

with which to spread the gravel, also. 
several mops made of cotton twine and 
used for a plying the hot pitch. 

"In all cases the pitch must lie thorough 
ly melted, and used while it is still boil- 
ing hot, as any attempt to use it other- 
wise will prove a failure. Never mix any 
coal tar with our roofing pitch, as the 
latter is of the proper consistency to be 
simply melted and used pure. 

"Don't use felt, pitch and gravel on any 
roof which has a fall or incline of more 
than one inch to the foot. If your roof 
is steeper than that aliove mentioned, 
cover it with patent wire-edged three-ply 
ready roofing, which is specially intended 
for all kinds of steep roofs. Our factor- 
ies and paper mills are all covered with 
t.hree-ply wire-edged ready roofing, owing 
to their roofs being .-too steep for felt, 
pitch and gravel." 

NOTES OF THE TRADE 

A report from Wingham, Ont., says 
Oat 'I In- Western Poundrv Co., Limited, 
-hut down their works temporarily 
owing (o trouble with their workmen. 

IS 



Douglas Bros roofers. Toronto, ha\e 
wvcral large ami creditable contracts in 

VI ii. his points in Canada. \t Sturgeon 

Fills and at Espanola they are roofing 

pillp mill-, and at Montreal, the Bank of 
Montreal and the Stock Exchange. 

I he Enterpi !-•■ Foundrj Co.. Sack 
ville, N.B.. are building a two-storey 

'.I I \ 36-ft. addition to their foundry. 

The < lurnej Tilden Co., Limited, To 

ronto, are sending out a neat booklet 
describing the Poster side wall warm 
air register, which the trade will probably 

In' interested in. 

I here is a remark abl j active demand 
for galvanized sheets this year. Every 
year witnesses ;l n increase In the demand 
for this line, owing to the number of 
now uses to which it is being put. 

King's Elevator, Fort Arthur, is add- 
ine a 500,000 bushel annex and The Can- 
adian Northern Railway Company are 

contemplating the erection of another 

elevator with a capacity of 3,500,000 

bushels at the same place. 



Grates. 



Tiles, 



Etc. 




Sell MANTELS as well as Hardware— it 
will pay you. 

The Batly Stove & Hardware Co. 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for expoit Willi or wilhoul " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

>CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cab'es — Emlyn Engineering Works, 

Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., ENGLAND, 

ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u ,'", . FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

Steward & Romaine Mfg. Co. 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

For fastening all kinds of material to Brick, 
Stone or Cement, 

124 North Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



.&. 



ONTARIO WIND ENCKE » 
& PUMP CO. 




Atlantic Ave. Joronto 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement. 



STOVE BRICK 

All kinds of Fire Clay products made to 
order from patterns. Wiite for Price List. 

TflNF^ RRfK BRACONDALE, P.O., ONT- 

JU11LJ OI\\JJ,f (NEAR TORONTO) 



America is bound to shine. 

The highest lustre quickly produced on all 
metals. 

Solarine Satisfies 

Solakink injures nothing. Ask your jobber or 



"SOLARINE " 



TORONTO. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN ? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.8.A. 



Mr Parcels Are Sale 

when well wrapped in our brown 
or manilla wrapping paper. This 
paper has been proved reliable time 
and again. Toughness and dura- 
bility are proof against rough usage. 



CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



PATENT STEEL HOG TROUGHS 




Something new, something 

long wanted, 

A fine line for Hardware trade. 

Write for 

Prices and Agency. 



I am placing on the market this Steel Hog Trough, made of No. [4 Steel Boiler Plate, A trough thai 
't is impossible for the hogs to chew or destroy . Edges finished wiih >« wrought iron pipe, slotted and 
driven on. Cross bars to prevent hogs from crowding or lying in trough. 

Every hog raiser wants them and is going to have them when he finds Out whul they are. A ■■ 
seller, as they are practically indestructible. 



WILBER S. GORDON, 



TWEED, ONT 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle. 1 111 15 Kront Street West, TORONTO Selling Agent. 



When ordering your stock of Whip?, remember that 

THE MORGAN WHIPS 



Quality, 



Are the standard for 

Workmanship, Durability, 

LOOK FOR THE MORGAN LABELS. 

Manufacture 1 by Till: MORGAN COMPANY, Limited 

Ask your dealer for them. TORONTO, ONT. 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN. Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and tbe 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchant*, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information no effort 1b spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial aflalrs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
Walshes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG. MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man. We»te'n Canada, Toronto. 



DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT. 



LT.S. Patent Jan. 18,' 95, Canadian Patent July 22, '95 




J A Vva are laced with steel % inch wide. 4 inches long, 

firmly fastened to jaw, checked and hardened. 
Vis B weighs 38 pounds. DR1 LI. weighs 13 pounds. 
For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 

Made by — 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 
Made by Taylor-Forbes Co., Limited, Guelph, Ont. 

4!) 




H « rci w» r< .1 1 

M«-t-l 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE 



Speculation and Insurance. 

L[FE insurance has of late years 
undoubtedly inculcated habits 
<>f thrift among the Canadian 
people, and the growing in 
Ruence of the principle has 
been very noticeable during th« past few 
Since, however, the Introduction 
into Uanada of the Btock-gambling craze, 
one ol n- most regrettable resultB is the 
effect it lias had upon the life insurance 
companies and the policy holders of the 
Dominion. 

j who were, a short time ago, con 
ing thf advisability of effecting some 
provision for the protection of their 
families in this direction are now unfor- 
tunately not in a position to discuss the 
matter, their ability to pay their pre 
miiims being an impossibility. Called 
upon for margin after margin, the holders 
,,| policies. endowment and otherwise, 
have been compelled to sacrifice them in 
common with other securities to protect 
their stocks, and to day the condition of 
the insurance business is very seriously 
affected, as is also the condition of the 
assurers themselves. This is truly a very 
lamentable state of alfairs, and its ser- 
iousness is fully apparent to those on 
the inside only. Thousands of our 
people, who a few months ago were in 
comfortable circumstances, are now in a 
condition bordering on penury, and have 
in addition parted with securities which 
would have been a help in their old age, 
or in the event of their death, a comfort 
and support to those whom they left be- 
hind. 

It is to be hoped that the mania has 
nigh spent itself and that the sad lesson 
it has taught "ill prevent a repetition of 
such regrettable folly for all time to 
conic. 

Why Gold Was Not Shipped. 

REFERRING to the fact that no gold 
shipments, contrary to expecta- 
tions, had been made from New 
York during the week ending dune 20, 
Bradstreetfl says : " A factor in deciding 
Ik.- general result was the condition of 
tin- I. olid. ,n money market and the action 
of the directors of the Hank of England. 
Money at the British capital has t.ndcd 
to work easier, and the confidence which 
i- -down ky the financial powers of that 
city displayed by the some- 

\liat unexpected announcement made on 
la-t Thursday that the discount rate of 
the institution had been again reduced 



from .'.\ per cut. to 3 per cent.. Follow- 
ing a s this did closely upon the marking 
down of the minimum discount figures of 
the Bank of England from 4 per cent, to 
'M, per cent., it evinced a degree of con- 
fidence on the part of the leaders of the 
British financial world, which would 
..in calculated to induce confidence in 
the other large financial markets. It has 
been noted that the principal English 
financial journals have taken the ground 
that the course of the Bank of England 
and the tendencies in the London open 
money market were likely to be uncertain, 
and would be in a large degree governed 
by what occurred at New York, and the 
probabilities as to whether the liquida- 
tion which has been going on here would 
proceed in an orderly fashion or would 
be attended by positive banking 
troubles." 

Ames & Co.'s Statement. 

REFERRING to the statement recent- 
ly issued by Ames & Co., Aeinilius 
Jarvis & Co. say : " The rapid 
and satisfactory reduction of the liabili- 
ties of Messrs. Ames & Co. has proceeded, 
contrary to general expectations, without 
weakening the market to a very material 
extent. Immediately after the failure we 
spoke of the likelihood of payment in 
full by the above-named firm of all their 
liabilities, and even at this early date a 
proposition with this end in view is be- 
fore their creditors. The plan proposed 
would involve the payment of 100 cents 
on the dollar within 18 months, interest 
being paid in the meantime at the rate 
of 6 per cent. The first payment would 
be one of 25c. on the dollar on July 15 
next. The magnitude of the firm's oper- 
ations and their very large liability at 
the time of suspension, only about two 
weeks ago, makes it a remarkable thing 
that such a proposition as they are now 
offering could at this stage be submitted, 
'fhe liabilities, we understand, have been 
reduced from over ten millions to some- 
where in (lie neighborhood of four mil 
lions. 'fhe proposal has been very 

favorably commented on by bankers and 
is, and we should think no creditors 
would refuse their offer. " 

Canadian "Rails" in London. 

A fortnight ago we published an article 
showing why prices of Canadian rails 
would probably go lower, and arguing 
that on any material decline Canadian 
Pacifies were worth the attention of those 

50 



who were prepared to take the. shares off 
the market and hold for dividends. This 
view- we still entertain, and during the 
past week rt n opportunity has been given 
for acquiring Canadas at what, having 
regard to the outlook for the company, 
must be considered very favorable terms. 
The London Report, dune (J. 



Life Insurance as an Investment. 

THF Canadian public has been taught 
a severe, and, it is to be hoped, a 
wholesome, lesson, in the prolonged 
depreciation of railway and kindred spec- 
ulative stocks during the past few 
months. Millions of dollars have been 
placed practically at the disposal of pro- 
fessional manipulators during that short 
period and the result to many has been 
the loss of the savings of a lifetime. 
Gambling under the guise of stock spec- 
ulation has been rampant in our midst, 
and it can truthfully be said that thou 
sands of our heretofore well-to-do citizens 
are now sadder but wiser men. 

Canadians as a class are a saving and 
thrifty people, but the alluring prospects 
held out to them were too much of a 
temptation, and ordinary prudence and 
caution were thrown to the winds. Now 
that the mining and stock speculative 
craze has well nigh spent itself, the com- 
munity are looking for safer channels of 
investment and our financial and insur- 
ance institutions will soon experience the 
benefits of its return to reason. Perhaps 
no principle of investment appeals more 
strongly to the economical class than 
that of life insurance, and the immense 
amount of money involved in the tran- 
sactions of life insurance companies shows 
how their methods recommend themselves 
to the confidence of the public. Encour- 
aging saving and thrift, they appeal 
strongly to the thoughtful man, and as 
an investment promote a feeling of in- 
dependence equalled by no other security. 
Investment in life or endowment insur- 
ance means provision for old age or a 
protection to those we leave, and to 
carry it out saving and prudent habits 
are necessary, and with the incentive the 
necessity should be a pleasure. The 
large deposits made with the Government 
and the safe and careful management of 
I he standard companies doing business in 
Canada are an ample safeguard against 
possible loss, and the growth of their 
business is a certain indication of the 
prosperity and welfare of the country. 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE. 



THE 



Canada Permanent ««i Western Canada 

MORTGAGE CORPORATION 
Toronto Street, . . TORONTO. 



President GEO RUB GOODERHAM. 

tst Vice- President and Managing Director: 
2nd Vice-President : W. II. In ■ \ I i I 



ABSOLUTE 
SECURITY 

II E RBEH 1 M A ' IN 



We invite y ur tlepusit account, and are prepared to grant the 
best terms consistent with the absolute safety cf the deposit. 



YOUR 

sAVINCS 
SAFd 



Paid up ( Inpital S 6,ooo,boo 

Reserve Fund . 8 1.600,0 o 
Invested Funds $23,600,000 

EVERY FACILITY. 



INVESTMENT SECURITIES, 
GOVERNMENT, MUNICIPAL 
AND CORPORATION BONDS 

Yielding from 3y 2 to 6> 2 per cent 

Four per cent interest allowed on funds 

awaiting investment. 

A. E. AMES & COMPANY 

MEMBERS OF THE TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE , 

BANKERS 
18 KING STREET E AST, TOR NTO. 



W 



ESTERN 



Incorporated 
1851 

ASSURANCE 
• • • COMPANY. 



FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 



Head Office 

-r*~„~+~ Capital 

Toronto, Assets, over ■ 

Ont. Annual Income 



$2,000,000.00 
3.333.000.00 
3,536.000.00 



HON. GEO. A. COX. President. 

J. J. KENNY, Vice-President and Man. Director. 

C. C. FOSTER, Secretary. 



THE PRUDENT BUSINESS MAN 

will name as his executor a Trusts Corporation possessing a larg e 
Capital Stock, a Board of Directors of high standing and a trained 
staff of officers to ensure the efficient and economical administra- 
tion of his affairs and comfort and happiness of his family. 

THE TORONTO GENERAL TRUSTS CORPORATION, 

59 YONGE STREET, TORONTO. 

PAID UP CAPITAL - $1,000 000. 

RESERVE FUND - - - 290,000 

'i.-. Booklet on application. 



Special Advertising Rates have been arranged forSpa C e in 
"Finance and Insurance," and will be gladly quoted 
on request. 



CIk Bank of Coronto. 

[Incorporated U 
Head Office : - TORONTO, ONTARIO. 



Paid-up Capital, $ 2, 500,000. 
Reserve Fund, $ 2,ttOO,000. 
Total Assets, $24 t 000 000. 



Business Accounts opened on favorable terms. 

c. vin „. «..<....,. I for your spare money. Interest paid 

Savings Accounts j on ll,c>c com|«.urided twice a year. 

Drafts Sold for use anywhere In Hortn America or Europe 
Lntt.rs of rr.rfit I.....H J<:ash Credits tor Convenience ol Travel- 
Letters of credit iMiiM{ ]en ,,, |. UI()|11 . rime Credits tar Impoi 

Skm. rOH oi li ill. i I BOOB OB "BAHKHra 

Ll mh ..i out Offices >■<•■»" will receive courteous treat nt and our best services. 

The accounts of Merchants and Manufacturers 

are cordially invited. 



BONDS 



Protection 

Progress 

Prosperity 



We protect you and also save the employee 
from being under obligation to anyone. 

Because we always lead and never follow 

On account of fair dealings with its patrons, so 
as to secure a continuance of their business. 



The above refers to THE DOMINION OF CANADA GUARANTEE 
AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE CO. 

Bonds issued on persons holding positions of trust. Kor rates and 
full particulars, apply, 

J. E. ROBERTS, General Manager. 
Cor. King and Yonge Sts.. - TORONTO. 



«^~ Money "®* 

CAN BE SAVED BY MEANS 
OF AN ENDOWMENT POLICY. 

YOU CAN ONLY SECURE 
SUCH A POLICY WHILE YOU 
ARE IN GOOD HEALTH. 



Pamphlets and Full Particulars regarding the 

New Accumulation Endowment Policy 

nest on application. 



Confederation Life 

ASSOCIATION. 

W. H. BEATTY, president. 
W. C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALD, 

ACTUARY. MANAGING DIRECTOR. 

HEAD OFFICE, - TORONTO, CANADA. 



51 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE. 



The Annual Bank Meetings. 
MONTREAL. 

THE annual report of the Rank of 
Montreal was submitted to a meet 
.•f the shareholders on .lune I. 
This bank is to be congratulated on its 
lificent showing. The statement 
a iut profit for the year of Sl,- 
813,483, the largest in the history of the 
bank. It lias increased its capita] to 
l . of this 11,379,240 is already 
paid u|> ami on this the net profits for 
the year would amount up to 13.55 per 
sent. This statement also shows that 
11,000,000 has been added to the rest, 
bringing the account up to 89,000,000. 
The public deposits and the current dis- 
counts have largely increased, and the 
directors have every reason to be satis 
Bed with the bank's prosperous expan 
Bion. The annual meeting will henceforth 
1„. h.ld on December 1. when the presi- 
dential address will be delivered. 

HAMILTON. 

The annual meeting of the Bank of 
Hamilton was held at the head office oil 
dune I."). Mr. John Stuart, who has 
been president of the bank for many 
years, resigned from the directorate, as 
did also Mr. A. G. Ramsay. The bank 
recognized the services of Mr. Stuart by 
granting him a retiring allowance of 
a year for the remainder of his 
life. This sum was unanimously voted 
on the motion of the largest shareholder 
and was a generous testimonial to the 
ability and faithful services of the retir- 
ing president. Senator William Gibson 
Bucceeds Mr. Stuart as president, and 
Mr. .J. Turnbulj will fill the position of 
vice president and general manager for 
the ensuing year. The shareholders are 
to be congratulated on the satisfactory 
showing made in the annual report— the 
most prosperous yet presented. It repre- 
sents the most successful year's business 
in the history of the institution. The 
feature of the meeting was the interest- 
ing and aide address of General Manager 
Turnbull, who L'ave a resume of the bus- 
and progress of the bank since his 
appointment to the management. The 
bank has now 50 branches ; its deposits 
have increased to $16,000,000, and its 
to ..\er $21,000,000. Under its 
careful management the Bank of Hamil- 
ton stands high in the confidence of the 
Canadian people and gives every promise 
of additional prosperity in the future. 

IMPERIAL. 

The 2-th annual meeting of the Imper- 
ial Hank of Canada was held at the 
bead office, Toronto, on June 17. The 
director-' report, showing the continued 
prosperity of the institution, was read 
by the general manager, and, at the 
subsequent meeting of the directors, Mr. 



I B Meintt was elected president, and 
Mr. 1). K. WHkie vice president for the 
nnpilrpg year. 

sovereign; 

The first annual report of the Sovereign 
Hank was presented to the shareholders 
at a meeting held on dune !), at the head 
office, Toronto. Twenty-one branches 
were opened during the year, and results 
were of a very satisfactory nature. Mr. 
II S Holt was reelected president, and 
Randolph McDonald and .lames Car- 
ru thers, vice-presidents. 

ONTARIO. 

The annual report of the Ontario Hank 
-hows that it participated in the general 
prosperity. Five thousand dollars was 
granted to the officers' pension fund. Mr. 
G. R. R. Cockburn was again elected 
president, and Mr. Donald MacKay, vice- 
president. 

EASTERN TOWNSHIPS. 

The shareholders of the Eastern Town- 
ships Bank have every reason to feel 
pleased at the annual report submitted 
at their annual meeting, held in Sher- 
brooke on June 3. Public deposits have 
increased three-quarters of a million, and 
nearly a million more of the bank's funds 
is available for immediate use than ever 
before. 

STANDARD. 

At the annual general meeting of the 
shareholders of the Standard Bank, held 
in Toronto, Mr. W. F. Cowan was elected 
president and Mr. Frederick Wyld, vice- 
president for the ensuing year. The net 
profits for the past year amounted to 
9181,893.48, of which 175,000 was added 
to rest account. 



lilt: rRADERS. 
The president of the bank, Mr. C. U. 
Warren, presided at the annual meeting 
of the shareholders of the Traders' Hank, 
held in Toronto on June 16. Eleven 
branches were opened during the year. 
I'he net profits amounted to $107,3 10,78 ; 
of this $100,000 was added to rest 
account. 

UNION. 

'I'he annual meeting of the Union Hank 
was held in the City of Quebec on June 
15. The bank has now 09 branches 
throughout the Dominion, and the liusi 
ness for the year was of a very satisfac 
tory character. 

Financial Notes. 

The Royal Hank of Canada is about to 
open a branch at Chilliwack, B.C. 

The Bank of British North America has 
opened a sub-branch at Longueuel, Que. 

The Sovereign Bank are now operating 
their new branch at the corner of Guy 
and St. Catherine streets, Montreal, 
with Mr. E. G. Spinney as manager. 

S. A. Godd has been appointed mana- 
ger of the branch of the Bank of Ottawa, 
recently opened at Regina. 

The Bank of Montreal have purchased 
a lot on the south-west corner of St. 
Catherine street and Pauineau road, 
Montreal, and, it is understood, will open 
a branch there in the near future. 

The Banking. and Commerce Committee 
at Ottawa have passed the bills incor- 
porating the United Umpire Insurance 
Company, the Pacific Bank of Canada 
and the City and County Bank of Can- 
ada. 



SOME SORTS 

of work require Apollo; some 
don't. 

If you want your .iron to 
bend uniformly, to bear a good 
deal of working of any sort, to 
be strong, not brittle, not crack, 
not tear, to hold fast, to stay 
put, to be accurate; only Apollo 
will do. 

Quick service. Return a 
whole sheet for an inch of fault. 

American bheet Steel Company 
Battery Park New York 



52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

If you want to sell a FIRST-CLASS RAZOR, concaved by the best grinders 

in the world, 




H. Boker & Co.'s "ROYAL CANADIAN 



» 



is the thing. No line will give you better satisfaction. 

CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



luly 3, 1903. 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as arc usually ordered by retail 
dealers OD the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being tor larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it i>erfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits 

56 and 28-Ib. ingots, 100 lb. *33 00 $34 00 

TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

MLS., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes $6 75 

IX " 825 

IX X " 9 75 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC 6 75 

IX 825 

I X X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 700 

I X X X " 8 00 

D C, 124x17 4 50 

DX 5 25 

DX X 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 4 00 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 50 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. > 

" 14x60, " }■ .... 7 00 
" 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 

* 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, 14 to 3-in. base 2 90 

fileigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T Firth&Co.'s tool steel, per lb 12J 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Morton's tool steel 12i 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C." 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel 08 09 

Park's "Silver ' tool steel.... 12 14 

" Special" 15 20 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel 10 20 

" " Air Hardening" 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

Jin 09 09J 

Jin 104 11 

2iin 0|13 134 

Jin 14$ 15 

3* fa 17 17J 

4 in 34 35 



STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

}in 2 50 2 60 

3-16 in 2 60 2 70 

i in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. Com. D.F1. 

10 and 12 gauge 2 55 2 75 

18 gauge 2 85 3 00 

20 " 2 85 3 00 

22 to 24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 3 15 

COPPER WIRE. 

Discount, 50 per cent. 



CANADA PLATES. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half-polished 3 00 

All bright 3 75 



IRON PIPE. 



; pipe— 
t inch 



3 00 
2 30 



i 1 - :::::; 

I 

21 " 

« " 

34 " 

4 " 

4J " 

5 " 

6 " 

Galvanized pipe- 

} inch 



3 00 
3 10 
3 85 



3 25 
2 40 
2 65 

2 85 

3 65 
5 20 

7 35 

8 95 
12 55 
21 00 
25 00 
32 00 
38 50 
45 00 
48 00 
63 00 



3 20 
3 45 
3 85 
5 00 
7 20 
10 05 
12 20 
16 85 



Malleable Fittings— Discount 15 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings— 

On unions, 55 per cent. ; on nipples, 60 per 
cent.; on all others, 50 per cent. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queens 
G.C. Comet Bell. Head 



16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge . 

26 

28 



4 05 3 75 3 75 
4 25 4 00 3 90 
4 50 4 25 4 05 



American brands, $4.40 for 28 gauge. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 



4 05 
4 25 
4 50 



CHAIN. 

oof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 

5-16 

I 

7-16 |; 

9-16 



7 85 
5 25 
4 50 
4 25 
4 20 
4 05 
4 00 
4 00 



8 10 
5 50 
4 75 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 
4 50 



Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 
35 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 



COPPER. 

ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting 15 50 

Lake Superior 

Bars. 
Cut lengths, round, 4 to J in. . 23 00 25 00 
round and square, 
1 to 2 inches.... 23 00 25 00 
Shed 
Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 oz., 

14x48 and 14x60 22 00 22 50 

Ptaiu, 14 oz., and light, 16 oz., 

irregular sizes 22 50 23 00 

Tinned coppersheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft,, 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 23 

35 to 45 " " .... 22 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 21 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign-, per 100 lb 6 25 6 50 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET 

5-cwt. casks 6 25 6 50 

Part casks 6 75 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Notk. Cut sheets 4c. peril)., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 30 p.c. dis. fob. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS. 

Light soil pipe, discount, 45 and 5 percent. 
" fittings. discount 50 and 5 p.c 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 55 

and 5 per cent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

S( )I,DER. Per lb. 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 20 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 19 194 

Refined 19 

Wiping 17 184 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 9 00 

WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 5 00 5 25 

No 1 4 624 4 874 

No. 2 4 25 4 50 

No. 3 3 874 4 12J 

No. 4 3 .50 3 75 

Munro's Select Flake White 5 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 5 25 

Brandram's Genuine A 6 50 

" Decorative 7 6 00 

" No. 1 5 50 

" Monarch ' brand 6 124 

Decorator's Pure 5 50 

Essex Genuine 5 25 

53 



RED LEAD 

Genuine, 560 lb casks, per cwl >t 76 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 5 26 5 50 

No. 1, 5WIb, 'asks, per cwl 4 no 4 B5 

No i. 100 lb kegs, per cwl .. 4 25 1 BO 

wini 1: ZIM 

Extra Ke.l Seal (Hi 08 

No 1 06| " 07 

No. 2 005 006 

DIIY WHITE LEAD 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 

No. 1, casks 5 00 

No. 1, kegs 5 25 

PREPARED paints. 

In }, J and 1 -gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualities, per gallon 100 

Barn (inbbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 40 

Canada Faint Co, 'spore 1 25 

Toronto Lcad& Color Co's pure .... 125 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 120 

Standard Paint Co.'s "New 

Bra." 1 30 

"Globe" 1 30 

barn 60 70 

The Francis - Frost Co 

"Ark' Brand 1 25 

The Francis - Frost Co.'s 

British Navy deck 1 50 

Hollywood paste paint ' I 40 

" liquid paint 1 25 

" floor paint 1 25 

Henderson & PotlS's "Ancle u 

Brand 1 35 

Globe Paint Co.'s mixed 1 30 

Globe Paint Co.'s barn and 

bridge 75 

COLORS IN OIL. 

25-lb. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian red, per lb 034 05 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 07 Hi 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French Imperial green .... 014 

Signwriters' black 16 

Umber 04 06 

Sienna 04 07 

COLORS. DRY. 

Common ochre, bbls 1 15 1 30 

Yellow ochre (J.F.I, S I, bl.ls 2 00 

Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red, bbl 1 50 2 25 

English oxides, per cut 3 00 3 2i 

American oxides, bbls 1 25 2 75 

'anadian oxides, bbls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per lb 10 

" umber, " " 08 10 

Raw umber 08 10 

Drop black, pure 10 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Chrome greens, pure per lb . . 09 10 

Golden ochre 003 004 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb. 

boxes, per lb 06 12 

Fire proof mineral, i>er 100 lb 1 00 

Genunie Bng. Litharge, per ib ... 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb .. . 1 25 1 50 

Pure Indian red. No. 45, lb 08 10 

Whiting (common), bbl 55 60 

English vermilnsi in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 

ELUESTONE. 

Casks, for spraying 5 50 

100-lb. lots, do perb 9 0* 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 



EMERY { 



MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 

Flour 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, Montreal, 



PI 11 \ 

Bulk in bob 1 7IJ 

Bulk in less quantity 1* 

Bladders in bbls » 00 

Bladders in kegs, Nixes or loose 

■ 

2 50 

Bladders in hulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 50 

\ AltMslltS 

P t mil. Net. 

Carnag.. No.1 150 1 60 

Pale durable l««ly 4 10 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

... japan 1 50 1 60 

\ I I irown japan 85 9P 

1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

do. 1 90 1 mi 

Hani ml finish 135 150 

Lighl ..il finish 1 60 1 70 

Pamar 1 75 2 00 

Jbellac, white 240 250 

... 2 30 2 40 

rurpentine. brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite vaniish. 1 gaL can, each. 2 00 

< Iranitine floor finish. |H-r gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, 81.20; 

: 7"- ; size 3, 40e. eaeh. 
sh.nv in Williams kopal vaniish. assorted 
from J pts. to 1 gal., 32.50. 

CASTOR on.. 

British. 1st uual.in cason.perlb 084 091 

■• small lots .... 10 10J 

OOD on.. ETC. 

Cod oil. |*rgal 50 55 

Pure nlive 1 40 

- neaUfoot 90 

OLUg. 

Common " 008 009 

h me<lal 10 14 

extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

18 20 

19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

. e, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

ooii v n i " s 

Caitridgea, 

B B Oapa Dominion, 50 and 5 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount to p c, American 
Rim 1 tiinion, 50 and 5 p c 

and Rifle, lu p.e„ Amcr 
i Fin Cartridges, pistol sizes. Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent 

,i Plre Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary- Dominion, IS per o 
I si Kir'-. Military anil Sporting, Amer- 

lean, add 5 per cent t" lis' B B Oapa, 
discount fl |mt ei-nl . American 

and empty Bhells, "Trap and 
"Dominion grades, 25 p. r cenl Rival 
an<l Ni'ro. 10 percent advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 
Primer-, Dom., 30 percent ; American, $1.60. 

Wads, is-r 11. 

ir-K white fell wadding, in j-lb. 

II 00 

Best thiek brown or grey felt wads, in 

J-lb. bad " "'' 

B<-st thiek white card "ads. in I 

12 and -mailer gauges 99 
Best thick white can! wads, in boxes 

.if 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in b 

of 600 each, 8 gauge. . . . 
Thin card wads, in boxes "f 1,000 • 

12 ami smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 
tach. 8 gauge 



t'h.iiiieally prepare,! I. lack edge grey 

clOth wads, in boxes ..t 25 1. I' 1 I M 

II and smaller gauge 60 

'.' and 10 gauges 70 

; and 8 " 90 

6 " 1 lo 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best «hite cloth wails, in 
boxes of 'J.'iO each 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

.-> and 6 " 1 90 

ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's. 80-lh. and over 10J 

Bay Budden, 80-lh. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AlliERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per ceDt. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 50 10 00 

AXLE UREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best duality 13 00 15 00 

BATH TfBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS 

Standard Enameled. 

54-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

5| 2nd " 20 00 

BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

c " o 114 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 ii 06 

No 1 05 

BELLS. 
Hand. 
Brass, <H) per cent. 
Nickel, 56 per cent 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63| per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door 

Oongs, Sargant s 5 50 8 00 

Peterboro', discount 46 iier cent. 
Farm. 

American, each 125 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 15 40 

BELLOWS 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 Of) 

Blacksmiths', discount per cent 



F\1 ra, 60 P''l eelll . 

Standard, 60 and lo per cenl 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in. 75 per cent. 

HITS 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount SO and 5 per cent 
Rookford. discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 47J to 50 percent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND ANIl BEII STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07i 12 

bolts AND NUTH. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common (si list) 50 and 10 
" full sq,. (82.40 list) 55 and 10 
" " Norway Iron (83 

list) 55 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50, 5 and 10 

Plough Bolts 50, 5 and 1(1 

Blank Bolts 50, 5 and 10 

Bolt Ends 50, 5 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65, 5 and 10 

Coach Screws, cone point 663 and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3;'c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4e. per lb. off. 
Stove Hods, per lb., 54 to 6c. 

BOOT CALKS 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " • 50 

BRIGHT WIRE QOODS 
Discount 62J per cent. 

BROILERS. 

Light, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 674 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 374 P er cent. 

Henis, No. 8T per doz 6 00 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " .... 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 u on 

American " 12 00 20 00 

BUTCHER KM\ Is 

Baileys per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb., 

per roll 

Ready rooting. 3-ply, nol under 65 lb., 

per roll 

Carpet Felt per ton 

Bear] Strtra Sheathing per ton 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 

Tar " " 400 ■• 

Dry Fibre '• 400 " 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 

ii Ix & I XI " 400 " 

Resin-sized " 400 " 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 
Oiled " .... " 400 " 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 

small packages " 

lie fined Tar per barrel 

Coal Tar 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 
Roofing Pitch per 100 1b. 



1-75 

90 

1 15 

45 00 
35 00 
ii in 
ii 50 
55 
BO 

70 
ii I'. 

1 00 
70 
ii 17 

25 
5 00 
4 00 
ii 16 

1 00 



BULL BIROS. 

Copper, 12.00 for 24-ineh, and 81.90 for 2 -inch 

BUTTs 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 



Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 per cent. 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bollard's " .... 6 50 

■ XSIORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cenl. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 31 and 32 per gross 8 50 9 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CHURN 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, 88 
No. 1, 18.50; No. 2, $9.00; No. 3, 810.00 
No., 4, 812.00; No. 5, 816.00 each. Ditto 
woo'd frames, 20c. each less than the above. 
Discounts : Factories, 53 per cent . 
delivered from stock in Montreal, 51 per 
ent. Terms 4 months or 3 per cent, cash in 
30 days. 

Churn frames, including bearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, 82.40; and 4 and 
5, 82.65. Metal frames, 25c. extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 
Axle, discount 65 per cent. 

CLOSETS. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. . 89 60 

Emb. " " " 10 2C 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Ten. Syphon Washout 6 00 

Emb. " " " . . 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Dowu Elgin or Teutonic, plain, . 6 00 

Low " ,Y " emb.. 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ontario Syphon Jet, plain 11 70 

Low " " " emb'd. 12 3" 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins. P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

. umpasses, dividers, ETC. 

A in. i nan, discount 624 to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

CH X I.I.KS, liRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

s Ac 1) , No. 3 per pair 17i 

8. &D„ " 5 '' 22J 

S. &D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINIIK. 

Torrey s Rod (15 p.c), per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 
( oa. b and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 per 

cent. 
Carpenters', discount 60 and 10 per cent, 



54 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We Make the Goods You Want 

because your customers want the goods we make. Send us your orders for 
BUILDING PAPERS, ROOFING FELTS, WIRE EDGED READY 

ROOKING, and all parties will be satisfied. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto and Montreal, 



DRILLS. 

Hand ami Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, discount 374 to 40 per oenl 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 3 10 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch '. . " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 



FILES AND RASPS. 



Great Western . . 

Arcade 

Kearney & Foot 

Disstons 

American 

J. Barton Smith . 



.70 and 10 per cent. 



McClellan 70 

Eagle 70 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 271 per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s "Simplicity" file haudle, 
per gross 85c. to $1.50 

GLASS. 
Window. Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 
Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 3 80 .... 6 75; 

26 to 40 2 10 4 00 .... 7 25 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 8 75 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 10 00 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 11 5J 

71 to 80 5 50 .... 12 50 

81 to 85 14 00 

86to90 16 50 

91 to 95 18 00 

96 to 100 20 00 

A dis ount of 25 per cent, is offered on 
" Double Diamond." 

GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc.* 
Stanley's, discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, 2-inch per gross 

Rope, i " " 9 00 

Rope, f to finch " 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 3 87 J 4 00 

Leather, 1} " " 5 15 5 20 

Web " 187 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole s, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 27$ per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 110 120 

SI ge. 

anadian per lb. 07J 08} 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian., per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 
tore door per doz. 1 00 1 50 



Fork. 
0. & B, discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Hoe. 

S B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Savi 
American per ,1c* I 00 1 26 

Plane 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 
Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian perpair 13) 

hangers, doz. pairs, 

Steel barn door a 85 6 00 

Si earns, 4-inch 5 00 

" 5-inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 11 J, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Lane's O.N.T. track, per foot 041 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 421 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Hen derson & Potts' "Anchor Brand' 

HINGES 
Blind, Parker's, discount 16§ per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-tn., per lb 061 

5-in., " 06| 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 05J 

10-in., " 054 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Cast Iron. 

Bird cage per doz. 60 1 10 

Clothes line " 27 63 

Harness " 72 88 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 00 3 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples, Canadian dis- 
count 471 P er cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 45 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 55 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"O" brand, 40, 10 and 71 per cent, off list i Oval 
."M" brand, 50, 10 and 5 pel cent. I head 

Countersunk, 57-1 percent. 
"Monarch," 60 per cent. 
"Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 \ I 
Iroti Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

Light, medium and heavy 3 35 3 60 

Snow shoes 360 385 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 45 3 70 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 85 

FOB. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 
Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

ICE PICKS. 
Star per doz. 00 3 25 



h II I I.ES. 
Brass spun, 7'. percent, discount oil new list. 

i topper |,.r lb. o .'So mi 

American, 60 and lo to 66 and 5 per oenl 

KEYS. 

Look, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
I »1 it. trunk and padlock, 

American per gTOH 60 

KNOBS 
Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 | $0 

Bronze, Berlin ,ier doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 : 

shutter, porcelain, K. .V: l.. 

screw per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs per doz 100 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP Wl' K-~ 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast per doz. 7 on 

No. 3, "Wrights' " 8 60 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold Mast. . 9 00 

No. " 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz, extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per dOZ. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized........... " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

Bang, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINES. 

Fish per gross I I ( '-' S I 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 12-in. wheel 7 50 

Star " 5 50 

Daisy " t 90 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 6 50 

Ontario, " 14 25 

Discount, 50 per cent 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10%-in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 60 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS 

Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 

Russell & Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per rrni 

MACHINE SOBXVi - 
Iron and Brass 
Flat head, discount 25 per t cut. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent . 
U VI. LETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz. 1 25 1 511 

Carpenters', hickory, 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz 5 50 6 50 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discount 334 P ( ' r cent. 

German, 15 per cent. 

(Jem each 1 15 

MILK c V \ I KIMMINCS 

i 25 pel cent. 

\ vt is Cut Wire 

2d and 3d 3 46 3 1 5 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4and5d 2 85 2 95 

7d 2 75 2 80 

8 and 9.1 2 60 2 60 

12.1 2 55 2 55 

16 and 20.1 2 50 2 50 

SOdtbaee) 2 45 2 45 

cut nails in carlota '< 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per 



B VII. I'l li I 

German and American 1 75 3 50 

NAM. 8E I - 

S.piare, round and octagon, 

i» I gross 3 38 4 00 

Diamond 1 00 2 00 

Pill 1,1 II V SMI IV.. 

2-in. Mesh. 19 w.g, , dis. 60 per CI Dl 
.' in Mesh, L6 w.g and heavier, SO p ■ 





OAK I M 




0. S Navy 

Plumbers .... 


f i 1001b. .. 


6 75 
3 00 



OII.EIIS. 

M< l larj i Mod. l galvanized 

Oil can, wi'h Dump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Zinc and tin, discount .50, .V) and 10 \» i 

1 opper per doz. i 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per 

i. vl.v vnizep PAILS 

Dufferin pattern pails, disc, unit 16 per c 

Flaring pattern, discount 46 pen 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45perc 

1 1 I I I li WARE. 

Disoounl 10 per oenl off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 
6, 10 and 14-qt. Baring pails, dis. 4u per c a'. 
I titer cans, discount 40 per cent 
PI< £8 

Per dozen 6 00 9 00 

Pi. Tl HE N VII. s 

1 lain bead per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 1 00 

en ll HE WIRE. 
Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

| pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

I " " " .... 9 60 

PI. V\ Is 

Wood bench, Canadian disoounl 40 per cant., 

American discount 50 per cent 
Wood, fancy Canadian "r American, 371 to 

40 per cent. 

PLANE [RONS 

English per doz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NlPPI I - 
Buttons genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 

37J to 40 per cent 
Button's imitation.... per doz. 5 00 9 00 
German " 60 2 60 

PLUMBERS e.i; 188 GOODS 

standard Compression work, dis 
"J.M.T ' Cushion work, discounl Op 
Fuller work, discount 65 pel 

6 dozen lots and over of thi radis- 

count 1" per cent 

l.ever handle Stops and Waste, discount 6ll 
per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over, 

an extrs discount of 1" per cent 

"J.M.T." Globe, Angle and Cheek Valv. J, 

disoounl 55 per cent 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check \ 

discount 65 p. 
"J.M.T." ltadiator Valves, discount 

cent. 
Standard ltadiator Valves, discount 65 Jwr 

Quick-Opening Valves, discounl 70 

per cent. 

No ! I I »th co k . n.i 2 00 

Ho I " .... 

No 7 Pullei - " 

V. I 2 35 

i Cushion, basin 
COCk, hot and COM 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

208 2 25 

head l.rass cooks, discount 60 percent. 
iron " " 60 

Competition Globe, Angle and Check Valve 

discount 70 per cent. 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine 825.00 



55 



HARDWARE AMD METAL 



Our New 



GLASS CATALOGUE 

ie most comple-to \A/orl< ©v©r issued. 



Containing much useful and important information and instruction on all kinds of glass — which you ought to 
know —as well as a numerous variety of designs and illustrations of glass now used in modern buildings. 

EVERY KIND OF PLATE AND WINDOW GLASS IN STOCK. 



TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., 

Mill & Rutherford 



rVarerooms and Offlccs-135 to 143 Victoria St. 
Bending Works-209 to 213 Victoria St. 



TORONTO 



I D SPIKES 

i ol 20 per cent 

pi i .i.i \ a 

i~ i dm. u 55 1 mi 

Vxl. 82 33 

S.r.» 27 101 

Lvnini " «1' -' 50 

II MPs 
. ■ , Ini 8 80 

1 40 2 10 

Baddb r s pet dor. 1 00 l 8 i 

y 00 15 00 

Timi. peraet .. 72 

hollow per inch — 100 

i; INOI BO! 

Dominion, SO - 

700 

" 8 00 

1. 30b'alliin. ' 7 40 

35 " " 8 40 
40 " " 9 60 

dlon " 22 00 

•■ 35 - " 24 00 

" 40 " " 2? 00 

• off copper, boilers IS perra m. 

per doc net 1 20 up. 

RAzmis. per doz. 

Kllinis 4 00 18 00 

- 4 00 18 00 

7 50 11 00 

King Cutter 12 50 IS 00 

Wade \ Butchi r'a 3 9) 10 00 

Theili . 7 (X) 12 00 

6 00 12 00 

ntfnrd 10 00 11 00 

15 00 

i 8 Favorite 10 75 

13 00 

Griffni - 13 50 

RruTon Stropping Machini 13 50 

s 30 10 50 

I-.Ki.l~l I 1 ~ 
1 • 

RIVKTS AM. 111 EUU) 

Itmii Rivets, black and tinned, diaoounl 60*nd 

Inm Bona, diaoounl 55percent 
i 111. cartons, V. 

per lb. 

on lmn Ri»i ■- in 1 -Hi cartona, lo. 
per lb 

-. with usual proportion burn, IS 
pa oonl diaoounl Cartona, Ic. per lb. 

Bum only, diacounl 30 and 10 per rent. 
• ippered Riv< I 
per Hi 

MTl i 
Canadian, diaoounl 35 to 371 |*r i 
BOP] 

111 

" 14! 

12 

3-16 inch and larger 'i 16 

line* 21 

i booh 22 

Run*,., IS 

008 

l.ath Yam, alngle 

doable 
• ■ ' 

•• . . " 

l: I ' 

Boxwood, 'li-' 

Ivory, diaoounl 37j to 40 pi i 

-All II 

u ! poliahed i 

i. '• o 80 

- on am. BJtXRl I'in.i' 

B. k A. sand. A 

■ 
darnel (Kurtona) B to 10 per cent, advance 
On list. 



s\|- M'nl Is 

Bronzed iron with hooka . . .per 1,000 9 SO 

BAW8 

Hand, Disston's, diaoounl 12) percent. 
s \ n . diaoounl 40 per oent 
Crosscut, Diaaton's perfool o 35 SS 
s \ D, dis-ounl 35 par cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 

frame only 75 

svsll w EIGHTS. 

Sectional per Kxi lb. 2 SO 2 75 

Bolid " I 75 2 00 

- v - 1 1 CORD. 

Per Mi 25 30 

- \ w si is per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

u >, ta, No l Woodyatl (Morrill) I 25 
X-t'ui Seta, No.,3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 

si AI.KS. 

Gurney Standard, 10 pel cent. 

Gurney Champion, SO percent. 

Bnrrow, Stewart .v Milne 

Imperial Standard, discount 40percenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent 
Champion Scales, diaoounl 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, diacounl 35 per cent. 
" Dominion, discount 55 per cent 
" Richelieu, diacounl 55 per cerrl 

Warren's new Standard, diacounl 40 percent. 
i Ihampion, diacounl SO per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent, 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz 65 100 

scltKKN mums 

Common doors, '.' or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4 in style perdoz, G 80 

Common doors. 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

n stained, l-in style... perdoz. 7 00 
i in natural 

Colors, Oil finish per dOZ. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS 
Wood, P. EL, bright and steel, discount 87; 

per 01 

Wood, It. II., bright, dis. 82} per oent, 
P. II., brass, ilis. 80 percent. 
" R. H., " (lis. 75 per cent 
' F. H., bronze, ilis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " (lis. 70 per cent. 
Jorews, (lis. 87i per cent 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

iron " 4 25 5 00 

Bet, ease hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis, 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, iK*. 45 per cent 

s, ■, I II KS. 

Perdoz. net 6 00 9 00 

M V I III. s\ \1 ||s 

Canadian, diaoounl 4U per cent. 

SHI I 
I ill, TV CO . full niekeleil, disi on 
ami 21 per iint 

Baile] Cutlery, Japan Handles, diacounl c,7i 

per cent 
Seymour's, diaoounl SO and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AMi .sI'Alil s 

Canadian, diaoounl 15 per cent 

sINKs. 

Cast iron, !6xH 85 

18 x 30 1 00 

18x 36 1 10 

sN \ l-S 

.i 25 per cent 

l«k, Andrews ISO 11 50 

SOLDERING mo ns 

peril. .... 37 

2 1b ororer " .... 34 

-,.,i LRM 
Irm, No 4M .perdoz 2 40 2 55 

3 25 3 40 
SO and 5 per cent, 
Try ai I to 621 pen 

1 IKI. WARE 

Plain, diacounl 75 and 12; per cent off re- 
vised list, 
i ed. discount 75 per nenl off revised list. 

56 



s| M'l.KS, 

Galvanized "3 26 3 50 

Plain 2 90 3 1.5 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent, 

Poultry netting staples, discount I 11 percent 

STOCKS ami nit's. 
American discount 25 per cent 
stun I, 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindustan " 06 117 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " .... 13 

Ue " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas 1 50 

Wat Ayr " .... 10 

Bcyl he per gross 3 50 5 on 

Grind, 2-in ,40 to 200 lb., per ton .... 25 00 

" under 411 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

i \ v H ill s l. BTO\ K POLISH. 

No. I, 3 doz. in case, net cash 4 80 

No '', 3 doz. in ase. . " .... 8 40 

tacks, BRADS, in 

Carpel lacks, blued SO and 15 

tinned 80 and 211 

fill kegs) 40 

Cut lacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

1 weights 60 

Sm,, l.s cut tacks, blued and tinned 

In bulk 80 and 10 

in dozens 75 

Sue, lis, upholsterers', bulk. ...85, 12;, and 121 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bull 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12] 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpel tacss 

i toppei l;icks 50 

I lopper nails 52; 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 1)5 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads M 

Pine finishing 10 

Lining lacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk IS 

" " solid heads, in bull 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens <>iih 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double peinie, 1 i inks, papers. . 90 and 10 

bulk.. m 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPK I.IM 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather S 50 9 75 

i man s ach 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

l in HERS sMl's. 

Bailey's, discount 25 per cent 

Mill: M-.M I | , i 
Tin ease and dairy, discount 75 lo 75 and 10 

pei 

ii 
Newhouse, discount 25percent. 

Maine, H. S N , P. 8. ft W . 65 I iii 

Game, steel, 72J, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS 

Disston's, discount 10 per eenl 

German perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

s. ,v l). discount 35 percent 

I H I \ I > 

! ■ per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply o l!i 

4 ply 

ess pel lb 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

\ ISI S 

Wright's 

12? 

So. 1 3 .V) 



Saw \ is. 4 50 9 00 



IN 111 l.l. 1. 1 n H 'RI 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

disc || 50 pi I eenl 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, dis. ,,i ,n ,„i 

lOper cent 

i; '" ' Pi art, I rial 

50, 10 and 10 pel eenl 

WIRE, 

Smooth Steel \\ li 

No. O-'.l gauge $2 50 

}9 6c. i 

H 12c 

- " 20c " 

\l :: 

\i <oc •• 

J5 55c. 

10 " 70c. " 

Add 60c foi ooppei in ■ and 62 [or i inning 
Extra mi per too lb, Oiled wire Wi 
spring wn-e si, 25. special hay baling wire 30c , 
best steel win- 7:.c . bright soft drawn 15c 
chan "i.i [extra quality) si 25, pat ki d in casks 
i a 15 ., bagging and papering 10c 10 
and 100-Ib. bundles lOo , in 25 lb. bundles 
150 , in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c , in lib 
hanks, 50c, in l.-lb. hanks 75c . in I lb 
hanks si 

Pine siee] Wire, discount 2.5 per cent 
List oi extras: in loo-ti.. lots: No 17 
15 No. 18.J5.50 Xol'.'. si; No.20,J6.6S 
No 21, 17 No 22, 87 30 No 23. -; i'.5 No 
21, 18 No 25, >9 No 26, 89.50 No 27 
810 No. 28, sii No. 29, 812 No. 30. 813 
No.Sl.814 No.532,815 No.33,$16 No. 34, 
sl7 i tinned wire, Noa 17-25 

82 Nos. 20-31. >i--.Nos 32-34 86. Coppered, 
5c oiling. 10c in 25-ib. bundles, 15c. in5 

and 10-lb. bun. lies, 25c in lib. hanks, 25c 
in ;-lb. hanks, 38c, in [ lb. hanks, 50c. 

packed in casks or cases. 16c bagging or 

papering, lOc. 
Ihiiss wire, discount 621 i» t cent off the lis! 
Copper wire, discount B2j percent, net cash 

30 days. f.o. b i. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb. Nos. 4 . 
13 ?0 to 83.90 Nos 6, 7. 8, 83.15 to 

No 9, s2 50 No in. 83 
No 11. 83.25 to -■■ 15 No 12 
No 13, 82.75 No M -5 75 i,,s.'j.<.i5 No 
15, si 30 No 16 .-i 30 B« i lizea, No* 
6 to9, 82 27' f.o.b t leveland In i 

less. 

Line Wire, regular 7 strand, Ni 

No 19, J2.60 Hollow 
and. No. 17, 84.30; No 18, 82 70; No 
19, 82.35; No. 20. 82.30, i o b Hi 

Ten, ni,,. Montreal 

WIRE FENCING; 

i lalvanized barb 2 80 

nized, plain twist 2 iW 

Galvanized barb, t ,, i, Oleveland, 82 

less I ban i ai |l 

i .111.1.1. seniNi. \vm:i 

High Carbon, No 8 $2 75 

Nn. 11 

.No. 12 2 BE 

wiii i LOTH. 

Painted Be Osq.ft., net . . 1 50 

T , 3pei cent ofl 30 days 

\V Vs| I i 1,1 |l, N 

Colored pei lb. o 

White " 08 

H i:i M III .s 

Acme, diacounl 'ni 

Agricultural, discount 60 pi i i enl 

' oi I ll nuilie, disc.iunl 20 lo 25 per eenl 

Towers' Engini ei eai b 2 00 

s perdoz 5 *»> 6 nn 

Q >. K I'U" " .... 3 40 

Burrell'B Pipe each 3 00 

Pool ' perdoz. 25 2 90 

WRING] l - 

Leader perdoz 30 Of) 

Royal < anadian " 24 on 

' : ■ i 11 I l ' I n " 24 HI I 

" 24 00 

.... 27 00 
■ 3 per cent. 30 
wikii ..li l ll;. in w vsiikiis. 
i i dl ■ ■■■.ni in per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland &, Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET BUILDERS' FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



A Irl i>n« l^t* lN . 0N l : ^=i-r7V J r?r Ikon <£■; — ../ 4'^ /\ 


^IV 101 ^ ~ 8*52 


l H II w.L- l| tej ^ 


>m If 




N«'-' 1 5923 


4£81|^ 


1 *574 !•;„„ »^. 

Pi J^ in 




JEj K.flU'6 ^SfMC-' SMS 

*^% k 1 Hi 

r V J, )c3'-r») X m\ 


mm* 
to® i > 

ft> 8IBI fiirjS 


it- -- cCk-j; 
Li-'J J 07574 [vlN 7K9 p 

Z3h - '" : 


^=o \3f77 : N " 1 ,£ 

544 W/f 55J8 JLun 1 




HI 


OS29 


2726 1 

@ 
lea 

1 

» 5 b 3 ' 


i 



London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



cBELTING 



"Your 'Para* Rubber Belling lias proved 

in every way quite satisfactory." 

Canada Paper Co., 
Montreal. 



Canadian RuBBERCe 

MONTREAL -;> TORONTO 
W/MNIPEG 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 




ARE 





EXCEL IN 



Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phnad S a ' Pa -' 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambrollne 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Seallne 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlin 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 



.Limited 



Wiitirn Ontario Representative — 

WM. B. STEWART, 
Tel. M. 17 Front St., West, Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



llHI-t MMIK 




, TIIK • BU11GON" PATENT 







WIL 

KIN 

SON 



SHEEP SHEARING 
MACHINE is made through- 
out of highest quality material 

in conjunction with correct 
mechanical principles. Will clip a sheep in three 
or four minutes, and get about 6 oz. more wool 
than by the old fashioned Hand Shears. One of 
the chief objects of this machine is simplicity in 
(•.instruction ; every part interchangeable, thus 
ensuring satisfaction. The machine is driven by 
a flexible steel core, fitted with universal joints. 
Will run in any position, and will not burn or 
break like gut. The Combs and Cutters are made 
of the finest steel, every one being properly har- 
dened and tempered so as to retain a sharp keen 
cutting edge. These can be re-sharpened and 
made equal to new in the course of a few minutes. 
You hold the sheep the same as for Hand Shears, 

the machine does the rest. Can be used 
akk. f or dipping horses by using differently 

constructed head. 

DECATUR, BULL & CO., Montreal 

SOLE CANADIAN AQBNTS. 




ft STEAMER 
CLOTH 
•£/ 
(Mi 



[6)S*IL CIBTH^ 1 

\ V I HTM <§• 
<7SO, 



TELEGRAPHIC ADDRESS 
< " T ROPERIE 



M 



LEITH 



ESTABLISHED 1750 






: ACT "RER 



Cordage 



MANILA ROPE 
SISAL ROPE 
NEW ZEALAND ROPE ■ 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE , 

FISHING LINES ( 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNS& PACKINGS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 




& Canvas 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPINC TWINES 



BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



edinburch 
Waterproof 



4? AND A' 

WSAIL CLOTHE 
iJCOMPANVC? 
^ LEITH g\ 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE *N0;ST0RES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Greening Three-Chain Cow Tie. 

Wire link, polished. 
Nos. 1, 0, 2-0. 3-0, 1-0, 5-0. 




Greening Opi n Ring Cow Tie. 

Wire link, polished, 

Nos. 1, 0, '2-0, 3-0, 4 0, 5-0. 



Dominion Stall Fixtures, wrought steel. 

Dominion Short Cow Ties, Nos. 1, 0, 2-0, 3-0. 
A short chain allowing the animal's head as much freedom 
as a long chain, when used with Dominion or Greening 

stall fixtures. 



Greening No. i Stall Fixtures. 

Steel bar, 
Greening "Special" Cow Ties. 

Nos. 1, 0, 2-0, 3-0. 

Used with Greening or Dominion 

stall fixtures. 



LEWIS 



TORONTO, O r*f\ OTTAWA, 

87 YORK ST. « V^W. 54 QUEEN ST. 



Mail all letters to 



MONTREAL. 



YOU 

GET OUR 
PRICE. 



NA/E 

OET YOUR 
ORDER. 




American Open Ring Cow Tie. 

Flat steel link. 

Nos. 1, 0, 2-0, 3-0, 4-0, 5-0. 

Furnished with toggle or with snap. 



// -XRDWARE AND METAL 



GALVANIZED NETTING 



Season 
1904. 




Best quality Steel 
Wire Galvanized 

before woven. 

3 ply rope selvage. 

Easiest to erect. 



When placing your orders stipulate for Greening's make. Do not accept the cheap 

inferior goods that are now flooding this market. Our make is very little 

higher in cost, but by far the cheapest, quality considered. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Montreal, Que. 




COPPER WIRE 

aii-l Ti 

BRASS WIRE 

Of all Undi end for all purposes. 

PLAIN WIRE 

hi sod 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

Hi mixed 

H 

any I 

BALING WIRE 

I 



WIRE NAILS 

(if all kinds and for nil |nirjitistB 

WOOD SCREWS 

Klai Head, Bound Bead, 
Bright an<l I 

BRIGHT STEEL 
WIRE GOODS 

Gate Hooks and Byea Screw 
Books, Son ■■■ 
Jaci Chain Singli 

and Bras*. 
Jatk Ohain Double Bteel 
and Brass. 
iiii and Goal " 

W ir- I»«;'.r I'iiIIs, ( i»l l. r Plni 

STAPLES 

Poultrj N' 1 1 in. Barrel, Blind, 
Bed i el Btanlei 

mwii: to oidar. 



Manufactured by 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

LIMITED 
MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 

HEAD OFFICE MONTREAL 

Long Distance 'Phone to all Departments. 




Wise Buyers 



Want. 



Best 
Values. 

Be Wise and 

PERFECTION WIRE CHAINS 




-MADK IN— 

COW TIES, 

HALTER CHAINS, 

DOG CHAINS, 

TRACE CHAINS, 

HOBBLE CHAINS 



Smoothest 
Strongest 

iii:\i i in i 

BEST MADE 



SPREADER CHAINS and for STALL FIXTURES. 
UK STANK BEHIND 01 B GUARANTEE. 

McKINNON DASH & METAL WORKS CO., 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT. Limited 

FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 



* 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



::;rt;:.:S: T BEflEO.B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron and Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturer! Ol Wire Window Uuards, Wire Cloth. 
Moulders' Kiddles. Children's Cots, I'.. ink and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing. Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work, j 1 7 Klng gt We8t TOR oNTO, ONT. 




T 

A 

A 

t' : f 

WOVEN WIRE 
FENCING 

That is why 

THE BEST SELLER. 

It not represented there, write for catalogue an 
prices. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 



Made from No. 9 hard 
steel wire throughout. 

Made to sell, to last, 
and to give satisfaction. 
That is why the IDEAL is 



Unexcelled in quality. 
THE 



Prompt shipment. 



McGregor-Banwelt Fence Co,, 



WINDSOR. ONT. 



Limited. 



o««<<<<<«<<«<<<<<<<<<<«<<«<«| 

HARTIYfAN 

I Steel Rod 

3 Picket Fences 



iiiiitiiiiiiiini 1 

ItllllHItllliltlllilllil in 

iiiiitiiniiiiiiiiiiitiii in 
(iii i nil 1 1 ii in 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin in 

nwtm-mmnanwmiKixis&it 



stiintl up erectly, preserve their alignment, are most attractive in 
appearance and permanently serviceable. Specially adapted to 
Parks, Cemeteries, Schools, Churches, Lawns and Public and Private 
Enclosures. Three sizes, five styles and seven heights of picket with or- 
namental posts ami gates meet all requirements, Free catalogue and price 
list on application. 

CUYAHOGA WIRE & FENCE CO., cuyaho^a^s, oh.o. 



o> >>>*>>>>> »>>>>>>>>*>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>»> >o 




Canadian Representative: ALEXANDER OIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 
75 YEARS ESTABLISHED 1823. 75 YEARS 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



Use Syracuse Babbitt Metal 



IT IS THE 
BEST MADE. 




For 
Paper and Pulp 
Mills, Saw and 
Wood Working 
Machinery, Cotton 
and Silk Mills, 
Dynamos, Marine 
Engines, and all 
kinds of 
Machinery 
Bearings. 



Wire, Triangular and Bar Solder, Pig Tin, Lead, Ingot Copper, Ingot Brass, Antimony, Aluminum, Bismuth, Zinc Spelter, 
Phosphor Tin, Phosphor Bronze, NlckJe, etc., always In stock. 



Canadian Works, Montreal, P.Q. 

American Works, Syracuse, N.V. 

Head Office American Works, 94 Gold Street, New Vork. 



Syracuse Smelting Works 



. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



''THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

.ie obtainable. Specially 
! With or without " Lmlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cab'r- Knilyn Engineering Works, 

Machireiy. NewBOtl Nkuiokt.Mon., England. 

ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

, , , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELEC TRO PLATE. . . . 

Atk for our Catalogue and Quotations. 

Steward & Romaine Mf£. Co. 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

For fastening all kinds of material to Brick, 
Stone or Cement, 

124 North Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



ONTARIO WIND ENDUE 
& PUMP C 




Atlantic Ave. .Toronto 



1 



Fire Clay 
and Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement. 



STOVE BRICK 

All kinds of Fire Clay products made to 
order from patterns. Write for Price List. 

TfiNPQ RROQ BRACONDALE, P.O., ONT. 

JUllCJ DnUOi, (NEAR TORONTO) 



America is bound to shine. 

Tli.- highest hiatre quick]} produced on all 
metaJi 

Solarine Satisfies 

<i:ink Injures nothing Ask jrour jobber or 



SOLARINE." 



TORONTO. 

Baltimore. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN ? 

Send for Folder No.14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 
Rochester. N.Y., D.8.A. 



The Best 

wrapping is the kind to use. Poor 
quality papers mean loss and dis- 
satisfaction. Our brown and 
manilla wrapping papers arc strong 
and durable. 

MADE IN CANADA 



Canada Paper Co., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL. 



PATENT STEEL HOG TROUGHS 




Something new, something 

long wanted, ; 

A fine line for Hardware trade. 

Write for 

Prices and Agency. 



I am placing on the market this Steel Hog Trough, made of No. 14 Steel Boiler Plate. A trough that 
't is impossible for the hogs to chew or destroy. Edges finished with % wrought iron pipe, slotted and 
driven on. Cross bars to prevent hogs from crowding or lying in trough. 

ry hog raiser wants them and is going to have them when he finds out what they are. A great 
seller, as they are practically indestructible. 



WILBER S. GORDON, 



TWEED, ONT 



G. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of~ 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle, 141-145 Front Street West, TORONTO Selling Agent. 



When ordering your stock of Whip?, remember that 

TI1C MORGAN WHIPS 

Are the standard for 

Quality, Workmanship, Durability, 

LOOK FOR THE MORGAN LABELS. 

Manufactured by THE MORGAN COMPANY, Limited 

Ask your dealer for them. TORONTO, ONT 



CHAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JAREL) CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nob. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRAD3TREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating Information, no effort Is Bpared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and It 
(ur alshes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of Its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.S. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C. IRVING, Gen, Man, Western Canada, Toronto. 




Vollmar Lmproved 



Perfect 



Washer 



It has a most enviable record. A perfection of its kind 
— will wash more clothes in less time, do it better and 
easier, with less wear and tear, than any other machine. 
Prices on application. 

('oi.nr.KNE. Sept 10th, 1902, 
Messrs, Wkhtman & wahu Mm. Co., London, 

Dkak Sikh,— We have used the washer again and tind that further use 
ed its value to us. The Kills ure simply delighted with it, as they can 
40 the washing and be presentable for callers if need be. 

MBS. It. WEEKS 

The above is a sample of the many kind words said about the Vollm a 
■Creel N" when addressing us.) 

The Wortman & Ward Mfg. Co., Limited 

No 1500 William Street, London, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



R. B. 



DVACO 9 r*r\ PORT TALBOT, SOUTH WALES, 
D T MOO OL \S\J.n GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELING 



BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES, RECTANGLES. Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS. 



Brands SKER, and SKER BEST." 

xport Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Sole Canadian Export Agents, 



Cable address : "CROLLO," LONDON. 



WALKERS QUICK^EASY ICE PICKS 






SEVERALOTHERSTYLES ILLUSTRATED IN OUR 1903 CATALOGUE 



MADE OF CRUCIBLE STEEL. OIL TEMPERED. ANTI-RUST. NICKEL PLATED. 
" WILLNOT BEND, BREAK OR RUST. EACH ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 

Erie Specialty Company. Erie. Pa 



Hardware! Hardware! 



To Lumbermen, Contractors, and Merchants Of the Ottawa Valley — Has it ever 
occurred to you that you could Save a Profit and get exactly what the Trade 
Require* by purchasing your supplies from 

THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Limited, 2S2ES ottawa > 0nt - 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE. 



ware Merchants, 
P. S.-SEND FOR PRICES. 



ATKINS 

HICH-CRADE, SILVER STEEL SAWS 

Are the FINEST that Money, 

Experience and Skill can Produce. -,- < ^' 

No dealer's Stock Is complete without them. „-. #'* 

They are easy to sell. Every saw warranted. <>'^** 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

H. P. HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. ^ ~ ~~ 

Toronto Office: 30 Front St. East, Tel. Main 1896 





l> 



RrtcT.jSfc 



;^,^;£- 



E.C. ATKINS & CO 



Incorporated. 
Factories and Home Offlcei INDIANAPOLIS, 



IND. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




the "PERFECT" 

LOOSE AXLE. 

REELS 

•• 1',. 4 ill. 



STEEL 
BARN DOOR HANGERS 

AND 

TRACK. 

4— I 1 1 I 




STEEL TRACK, ] In. z 8/18 In., WROUGHT BRACKKT8. 
I 1 , in \ 3 16 In., MALLKABLE 
HADE IN I, 8, H and 10 feel lengths. 



the "ATLAS" 

ROLLER BEARINGS 
NO. n. g to. WHEELS 
" 1. S'.Jin. " 
" 2. 4 in. 



WE ARE THE ONLY MAKERS IN LARGE QUANTITIES IN CANADA. 



OUR QUALITY AND PRICES EQUAL, AND OUR FINISH EXCELS, ALL 
FOREIGN-MADE GOODS OF THIS CLASS. 



When ordering specify our make, and you will not only get better value, but 
will keep good Canadian money circulating in Canada. 

Manufactured by tm u*jam*m*A^m . 

TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, GVELPH 

AT THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HARDWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 



Kem|> 




COLD 

BLAST 

LANTERNS 



If your customers 

want a Lantern that 

won't blow out 

" smoke 

" leak 

" break globes 
but will give a per- 
fect light in any wind 
sell them Kemp's. 

The acme of per- 
fection in lantern 
making. They will 
not cost you more 
than other makes. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 






, 






I 









i 




: 



Why Dunlop? 

Yes, some merchants have wondered why so 
many of their customers insist on the Dunlop 
Trade Mark on their bicycle tires, lawn hose, 
rubber heels, pneumatic and solid rubber carriage 
tires, rubber mats, etc. There is just one reason 
for it. They want the very best and they know 
they gel it in 

Dunlop Quality. 



THE DUNLOP TIRE CO., Limited, 

TORONTO, CANADA. 

Depots at, Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



* ******* > mt m m *** * * 



' .»l> p ,^uft^vy.' >' J »' ^B M . »»'» l . »:*W W Bi<r^w> y ' )>j ;i f i W f j ^ »mnMmm !i , i iiH » >T 



^M^j^m^^^^js^m^ 



glv^CT^^ 




Hi! ROW* 




AN D 



fcffi^^^ii;-:- / m 



--,-v, me^ *£**-*■ 



. 




VOL. xv. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY II, 1903. 



NO. 28 



Subjects Being Discussed at Ottawa 

Written for Hardware and Metal by a Alember of Parliament 




[NCE writing out article of last 

week< a part of which dealt 

with the purchase of cattle for 

restocking Boer farms in South 

Africa by the British Govern 

merit, the purchases being marie in the 

United States, a little more lighl has 

been thrown on the subject. 

We are the last to wish to complain of 
the Rritish Government, which, as re 
presenting the Home country, we wish to 
-import on all occasions and in every 
way in our power, lint the truest sup- 
port, after all is said and done, is that 
fair criticism which points out faults, so 
that those committing them, frequently 
unwittingly, may expunge them, and re- 
store confidence and good feeling. For 
this reason we shall continue to blame 
what we think blameworthy in England's 
treatment of Canada, in the hope that a 
similar course pursued throughout this 
land may take effect across the sea. where 
things Canadian are fretting such atten 
tion as never before. 

Rut. to come hack to our subject, it is 
now stated that the main reason for the 
purchase of the cattle in the United 
States is one of the best, a reason that 
we can all accept, for this is a commer- 
cial age — the very simple, but all-sufficient 
reason. that they can be purchased 
cheaper there. In spite of this, how 

ever, our point remains good that our 
representations made to the Home Gov- 
ernment weir ict met with that prompt 
ness which we think thev deserved. Had 
this very reasonable explanation been 
made to us in time, a lengthy and some 
what acrimonious debate would have been 
spared us. Canadians are anxious for 
trade, but we are not begging for it, 
even from the Mother Country. Our po- 
sition summarized is this ; we do not 
want Rritain to bin our products at a 
higher price than for what she can obtain 



them from other countries, (always, of 
course, excepting the case of a mutual 
preferential arrangement,) but we do 
think that where price and quality are 
equal this land should have the first 
chance. 

It may be mentioned that, in connection 
with this matter, a motion censuring the 
Government was introduced by Mr. Pope. 
who claimed that our interests had not 
been sufficiently pressed on the Rritish 
authorities. Mr. Fisher, the Minister of 
Agriculture, defended himself by stating 
that two communications had been ad- 
dressed to the Old Country people bj 
our officials, but without result. The 
vote, when taken, resolved itself, as us 
ual, into a straight party one, and the 
Government was sustained by the usual 
large majority. 



* # * 



Speaking of Kngland's relations with 
Canada, one may say that this is a most 
convenient centre for getting light and 
information upon this subject. Not only 
are Imperial politics given a great deal 
of attention by the members, many of 
whom are extremelv well posted, but the 
well-equipped library and reading room 
afford the very best sources of informa 
tion. 

The English press is, at present, most 
interesting. For example, we learn that 
in a bye-election, now in progress, "Re 
member Canada," is a battle-cry for one 
of the parties. "Remember Canada." 

just fancy that ! "Where is Canada ?'' 
was the cry in Fnglish mouths which a 
few years ago was most familiar to the 
chagrined pars of Canadians. Now, a 
nation undoubtedly needs advertising. 
just as a business does, and whether, in 
the fulness of time, Mr. Chamberlain 
succeeds in evolving and carrying out 
some scheme of Imperial preference or 
not, Canada is bound to be a large gain 

it 



er by the campaign which he has n 
urated. 

• • • 

\ uas to be expected, Mr. Labouchere 

lias arrayed himself strongly against M> 
Chamberlain, and in answering the form- 
er, the latter has said, in part ; "No 
"'"'■linns have been made, by England 
or the colonies, that the colonies sin 
render the liberty of framing their own 
tariffs, or of an alteration in the prac 
tice of leaving the colonies to decide, for 
themselves, their adherence or otherwise. 
to the commercial treaties of the Moth 
erland. No Colonv ever suggested to the 
Motherland the manner of protecting the 
fiscal freedom of the Empire." We 
should think not. Fancy Canada, for 
example, surrendering so important a 
part of her legislative rights, of her 
boasted rights of self-government. The 
country would he ablaze from Gaspe to 
Vancouver at the very idea of such a 
thing. To one of us, it seems rather 
amusing that Rritish statesmen sho*ld so 
gravely discuss such a thing. They cer 
tainlv understand but little, as yet, of 
colonial feeling. 

• » • 

There is yet more significance in that 
catch cry. "Remember Canada," than ap 
pears at first sight. Why "Remember 

Canada." rather than "Remember A.US 
tralia :" or more likely yet. "Remember 
the Cojgnies ?" Recause Canada is at 
last begii -ling to get her rights in the 
minds n f the people in Rritain. In rich 
ness of territory Australia cannot com 
pare with us. Tn proximity to England 
she cannot compete with us, and yet for 
years, yes, almost until the present, the 
average Englishman knew all about Aus- 
tralia and but little of Canada. To the 
average Briton, gold is indeed a utrong 
drawing card, and its discovery, in such 
rich quantities, in Australia, brought, to 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



that country, an inrush of British inuni- 

gration which put it to ri nt ol 

in the attention received 

Camula mon 

i\ ,..1.1 country ; too 

inntrj in which for a white man 

with any degree ol comfort, 

while to eay, the torrid heat of 

Australia, had do terror! for the men of 

a ;• clime, Well, everything 

the nation, as weQ as to the 

individual, who waits, and things are, 

indeed, coming to Canada, none of them 

for us than the friendly interest ftt 

last aroused in England. 

The Duke of Argyll, our old time Gover- 
nor General, has taken sides with Mi 
Chamlx'rlain, and summarizes his views 
frying that, in his opinion, the Moth- 
Ultrj and the colonies can a 
one another, not in matters of defence 
onlv, luit in commercial affairs as well. 



• • • 



In reading a recent issue of The Tor- 
onto News, we notice the fact that an 
English official, in discussing a big con- 
tract, tised the expression 'Canadians 
preferred,' and yet, it is not more than 
half a dozen years since English mer- 
chants used to request Canadian shippers 
to send their goods in packages resembl- 
ing this, that, or the other style of ship- 
ment of other countries, in order that it 
might not be discovered by the pur- 
chaser, that the goods came from this 
Canada of ours. To-day, we venture to 
assert, the inscription "Made in Canada" 
is not a detriment, but an assistance to 

the British retailer. 

• • • 

While England is being stirred as it has 
not been stirred for years on any com- 
mercial matter, w-e must not forget that 
Chamberlain's suggestion is under eriti 
rism in all parts of the world, and espeei 
ally in -the colonies which would be so 
largely affected by it. As to foreign 
countries, it i< amusing to see those 
which are well known to be unfriendly to 
all things British, warning the British 
elector s against the adoption of a 
policy which will mean the ruina- 
tion of the Empire's greatness. 
Surely Chamberlain could hardly have a 
more potent argument in his favor than 
the attitude of these, our enemies. As 
for Canada, it is not our place to discuss 
Canadian sentiment in this connection, 
within the limits of a short artiele, but 
01 -ay that. in Australia, feeling 
seems to be greatly divided. An ex- 
provincial premier opposes the crusade 

rongly, but the Federal Gi 
nient, if we can beheve Mr. Chamberlain, 

is friendly to his idea. 

• • • 

ing to be felt 
■ men, hers at the possibility of the 
re-entrv of the Manitoba School Qui 

Federal politics. \- a matter of 



fact, such a thing seems extremely [m 
probable. A genera] election is now in 
progress in Manitoba, and the Roman 
Catholics of the province are, quite 

naturally, taking advantage of the op- 

portunitj to attempt to make what they 
consider, better terms with the local 

premier, Mr. Roblia is at present situ 

ated. those Catholics who live in a lo- 
cality such as Winnipeg, where they are 

quite numerous, but still in a minority, 
are unable to establish separate schools 
bv applying a part of their taxation for 
that purpose. If they want these schools 
they still have to pay the full amount of 
taxes for general school purposes, and to 
maintain their own entirely at their in-. 
dividual cost. Against this state of 
things the Catholics of Winnipeg have 
appealed to the School Board, who have 
politely replied that they are powerless 
to amend the situation. From the 

S.hool Board they go to the Provincial 
Premier, who very much regrets the fact 
that there should be dissatisfaction, but 
declares that it is a matter for the Dom- 
inion Government. We are told, that to 
the Dominion Government then, the 
Catholics of Manitoba will shortly come, 
when, no doubt, it will be in order for 
the Premier of Canada to say that mat- 
ters of education are for the provinces, 
that Air. Roblin was in error when he 
said that he had not the j>ower to make 
the changes asked, and that he, personal- 
ly, with all the good will in the world 
to see wrongs righted, is constitutionally 
powerless in this case. 

The fart is. there is nothing so danger- 
ous and unpleasant for politicians to 
handle as questions affecting religion. 
Old friendships count for nothing, the 
political allegiance of years goes by the 
board, the fire and the rope, the rack and 
the thumb screw, once more are invoked, 
not as applied to the body, it is true, 
but to afflict the mind of former friend 
and present bitter foe. It is, in public 
life, what civil strife is in the realms of 
war. a frightful thing, arraying brother 
against brother and friend against friend. 
Ma\ it no more come into the realms of 
politics in this busy Canada of ours where 
all we want, at present, is opportunity to 
develop our great resources and our na- 
tional spirit, undistracted by anything so 
awful ;>•- religious strife. 
# # # 

If customs returns are an evidence, the 
general prosperity of Canada goes merri- 
lv on. in spite of the few failures we have 
had in connection with that precarious 
form of gain, stock transactions. The 
total receipts for customs last year, that 
is the fiscal year ending June 30, have 
reached the >plendid total of 936,619,659, 
an increase over the previous year of no 
than 94,666,860 While some may 
be found to deplore this large receipt, as 
it nn an a large -increase in importations 
lit 



of manufactured goods, many of which 
might lie made in Canada, we need not 
feel too badly over the matter, since our 
factories are. for the most part, working 
overtime as it is. We have so mtich to 
do in a country of our magnificent area 
that money, ami a good ileal of it, is an 
absolute necessity for us. We may write, 
academically as we will, about direcjt 
taxation being the most economical and 
the best, but we know that a Dominion 
Government that laid on a large amount 
of it. would last just until the next elec- 
tion, and not a moment longer. We 
must take note of conditions, and reckon 
with them whether we regret them or no. 
Even from the standpoint of the Canad 
ian manufacturer, the development work 
which we are enabled to do with a large 
income is a great boon. We aid a rail- 
way, for example, building into some 
part of Canada theretofore a wilderness. 
Population follows, goods are required for 
the newcomers, and the Canadian manu- 
facturer supplies his share. Let us, then, 
rejoice in our abundant revenues, just so 
lone as our own manufacturers are pros- 
perous, and when they cease to be so, we 
shall take counsel as is our duty. 



A PRO TRADING 8TAMP MAN 

J. E. Wilder, Montreal, proprietor of The 
Traders Advertising' Co., a concern which 
handles trading stamps, maintains his 
right to continue business in the face of 
the recent by-law passed by the Montreal 
City Council. He argues that the Federal 
Government only had the right to legislate 
in the matter, as it was one affecting the 
conditions of trade and commerce. This 
is according to a decision given by Mr. 
Justice Andrews some time ago when he 
declared a by-law similar to the one in 
question not only ultra vires of Quebec 
city, where it was passed, but also beyond 
the jurisdiction of the Provincial Legisla- 
ture. According to Mr. Wilder, his com- 
pany were making preparations to place 
the trading stamps in a leading dry goods 
store in Montreal when the by-law vvas 
passed, and the firm then refused to take 
them, causing some loss to The Traders 
Advertising Company. He will call upon 
the city to make good this loss ; nor w i 1 1 
he cease his fight against the by-law until 
the Privy Council itself has rendered judg- 
ment on the question if no other court will 
sustain him. If Mr. Wilder intends to do 
all this, a very interesting struggle may 
shortly be in progress. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt 8hlpmeat> 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON, ONT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IMPORTED GALVANIZED. 

Montreal, July 8, l'.">:\. 
Editor Hardware and Metal: — 

Our attention has been drawn to the 
circular issued by the Canadian manufac- 
turers of galvanized netting, and we also 
notice advertisement or page 4 of your 
last week's issue of The Hardware and 
Metal Merchant, which lias evidently 
been written with the intention of leaving 
the dado with the impression that die 
different imported nettings are inferior to 
those manufactured here. While this 
may be more or less true of certain makes 
that come from the continent of Europe, it 
will certainly not apply to the best grades 
o\ English. We are and have been 
selling for the last thirty years that manu- 
factured by John Lysaght, Limited, of 
Bristol, which is certainly second to none, 
if not the verj best that can be purchased. 
It has certainly a great many friends who 
so consider it. 

Our only reason for referring to this 
matter is that you may bring same before 
the hardware trade generally, so that they 
may use their judgment and past exper- 
ience before condemning in general the 
imported netting. 

A. C. Leslie & Co. 

GALVANIZED NETTING. 

Montreal, July 8, 1903. 
Kimi'ik Hardware and Metal:— 

My attention has been called to a cir- 
cular issued by The B. Greening Wire 
Co., Ltd., in regard to galvanized wire 
netting, and stating that large cjuantities 
of cheap and inferior goods are being 
imported, and warning buyers against 
buying same. They also mention this in 
their advertisement in your issue of 4th 

July. 

I have sold huge quantities of galvan- 
ized wire netting of the best English man- 
ufacture, and presume it is this netting 
that they have reference to. 1 can assure 
buvers that the quality of the netting will 
be found equal in every respect to that 
formerly supplied by my principals and 
which gave every satisfaction, and I ven- 
ture to say, will compare favorably with 
that made by the Greening Co. It seems 
strange that they should run down the 
quality of imported netting, especially as 
they are in the habit of importing English 
netting themselves, and are by no means 
able to supply the demand or meet prices, 
notwithstanding they enjoy ample protec- 
tion. 

The circular in question is unworthy of 
a firm like The B. Greening Wire Co., 
there being no foundation for the state- 
ments they made regarding quality, as 



Are You Making Enough Money 

out of your Paint Department ? Wouldn't you consider a proposi- 
tion that would help you make more- that would accrue to the 
benefit of your entire business ? 

The Sherwin-Williams 
Paint Agency 

is the best money-making proposition in the paint business to-day. 
It brings with it goods and methods that win success in face of the 
strongest competition. It sells most paint, makes most money for 
the dealer. 

We have not space here to explain our proposition in detail. 
The facts are fully and clearly set forth in our booklet "B-13." 
Send for copy to-day and learn how you can make more money 
out of your paint department. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

NEWARK, SAN FRANCISCO, MONTREAL. 

BOSTON, LOS ANQELES, TORONTO. 

KANSAS CITY, MINNEAPOLIS, WINNIPEG. 





CANADIAN DIVISION 



HEADQUARTERS, A PAINT FACTORY. 

21 St. Antoine Street, Montreal. 
VARNISH FACTORY. 

St. Patrick Street, Montreal. 



TORONTO DEPOT, 

HI York Street. 

WINNIPEG DEPOT, 

147 Bannatyne St., East. 



far as the netting I am selling the trade is 

concerned. 

Alexander Gibb. 



THE SELF-WRINGING MOPS 

IT will be noticed in Tarbox Bros.' 
advertisement this week that they are 
filling delayed orders for their self- 
wringing mop to the jobbing trade, rang- 
ing from St. John, N. B., to Vancouver, 
B.C., so that the retaiL trade should not 
allow this article to remain out of stock, 
as it has become an established household 
necessity- I" this connection Hard- 
ware AND Metal takes a great deal of 
pleasure in assuming no little credit for its 
share in popularizing this meritorious 
article. 

They inform us that when their first 
contract with this paper was made they 
could not see where the money was to 
come from to meet the payments unless 
the article was a success, and many times 
on the initial trips to the retail trade the 
dealer would leave the salesman during 
11 



his demonstration to look theadvertisement 
up in this paper and then return and place 
an order. When it is considered that 
their first advertisement appeared fourteen 
years ago, one sees what merit along with 
conscientious effort to keep to a permanent 
standard of value will accomplish in re- 
taining the confidence of the trade and 
public, for the Tarbox Mop has steadily 
and persistently increased in popularity. 

On account of the difficulty in getttng 
castings fast enough to fill their increasing 
orders they have devised a stamped steel 
wringing handle which has not only given 
them a better control of the output but 
improved the appearance, and the hand 
grip in the use of the mop. 

The trade should note this change and 
insist on having their orders filled with 
the mop bearing the maker's name plainly 
stamped in the metal, which is the only 
guarantee that the cloth with which these 
mops are fitted is of the standard weight 
and quality to make them of practical 
value. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOREST CITY GOSSIP. 

II \k-pw \i;i a\p Mir \i.. 
Richmond St., London, Ont. 
Jul \ 8, 

TI1K prevailing 

in ; department of the 

hardware business in London has 
h i- verj gener- 
ally thai there will be some 
in .1 couple of weeks ; business 
will then be quieter till the harvest really 
Some sorting is now being done 
in harvest tools, and a good demand con- 
tinues for hay fork rope. Travellers are 
on the road regularlj and still finding *u'r 
business, but, as stated above, i shorl 
time now will terminate this season's 
orders. Quietness will prevail until Sep- 
tember and then the demand for builders' 
supplies of shelf hardware will give fresh 

impetus to both the retail and whole-ale 

trade. 

* * * 

Robert Parsons, hardware and tinware 
merchant, who has been in London East 
carrying on business for over six years, 
has purchased the stock of R. S. Hannah, 
also of London East He is now selling 
off in detail this bankrupt stock in the 
Hannah store. Besides his own store 
here, Mr. Parson- doe- a large hardware 
business in St. Mary-, where he has had 
an established business for tour years, 
known as " Parsons' Fair." 

* * * 

London plumbers and tinsmiths are 
sympathizing with their fellow tradesman, 
Prank Knox, who fell from a scaffold 
while at work on a roof in Tillsonburg 
some time ago, and who has been un- 
conscious, save for strange intervals, ever 
since. He was given five days to live by 
a surgeon of the city, but he has lived 
since the Kith of June, when the accident 
occurred. When Knox fell, he struck on 
hi- shoulder and head, dislocating his 
-boulder bone, breaking one of his arms, 
and fracturing the bone at the base of the 
brain. He i- not paralyzed ; an abscess 
ha- formed ; hi- chances of recovery are 
now -aid to be good. 

* * * 

The monster gasometer, the construc- 
tion of which was begun just a year ago, 
is now completed. The builders were The 
Kerr, Murray Mfg. Co., of Fort Wayne, 
[nd., and it i- perfect in every regard, 
having answered to all the severe tests to 
which gasometer- are put. The gasometer 
has a diameter of 98 ft., and a circumfer- 
ence of 307 ft., with a capacity of 412,000 
cubic ft. New ga- purifier- but recently 
added by The London .in con- 

. unction with improved lighting appli- 



The Iver Johnson Revolvers Havel 
Shot Their Way To The Front. 

Absolutely 
Safe. 

Accidental 
discharge is 
impossible. 

Absolutely safe, always reliable, ever 
accurate and tim- u> aim, are sharp-shooting 
qualities of tt re\olvur that no fortress of roni- 
petitiou can resist. It's by employing these 
tactics of skill that 

Ivcr Johnson Revolvers Have Shot Their Way To The Front 

Send for Catalog. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 




Nov. York Office : 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG, MASS. 



ances, have very greatly added to the 
popularity of gas in this city for lighting 
and cooking purposes. Gas stoves are 
used in 2,000 homes in London, Out. 



The Silica- Barytic Stone Co. of Ontario, 
Limited, well known in this city and 
through the Dominion, have increased 
their business to such an extent that they 
are taxed to the utmost to complete their 
contracts before the closing of the season. 
They have secured contracts in the follow- 
ing places : The city of London, Wood- 
stock, Listowel, Port Elgin, Burford, 
Tavistock, Saltford, St. George, Both well, 
Embro and Markham. They have also 
secured several Government contrails. 
The total amount contracted for is about 
1,000,000 sq. ft. London is having several 
miles of granolithic sidewalk laid this 
year. 

* * * 

The Inland Revenue returns at the port 
of London for the month of June show 
but a very small increase over the month 
of June, 190:2. In June of this year the 
collections amounted to $35,942.75, and in 
June of last year the amount collected was 
$35,326.94, making the increase but 
$615.81. The figures were as follows': 
Spirits, ex warehouse, $5,244.03 ; malt, 
ex warehouse, $50,040.07 ; tobacco, ex 
warehouse, $1,82 1.25 ; raw leaf, ex ware- 
house, Si, 190. I"; cigars, ex factory, $10,- 
877.57; cigars, ex warehouse, ST, I 1!> ; 

mythylated spirits, sis.-,, ig; other revenue, 
$32. Total, $35,942.75, 

W. H. L. 

12 



TELEPHONE JUDGMENT 

The injunction case of the Town of Fort 
William against The Bell Telephone Com- 
pany was held recently before Mr. Justice 
Teetzel at Port Arthur. This case was 
entered last February by the town. The 
court ordered that the cast' be dismissed ; 
the plaintiffs shall not until judgment has 
been pronounced by the final appellate 
court, to which the action of the corpora- 
tion of the City of Toronto against The 
Bell Telephone Company of Canada, Lim- 
ited, now pending, may be carried ; or 
such action shall otherwise be disposed of, 
bring action or take any proceedings to 
interfere with the erection of poles or the 
stringing of wires by the defendants in the 
said town, or the erection or use of any 
other appliances permitted by their charter 
and necessary or convenient for carrying 
on the business of defendants in the said 
town. The court ordered that the plain- 
tiffs pay the defendants one dollar damages 
for loss -sustained by reason of the injunc- 
tion orders granted ; and also pay to the 
defendants their costs of Ihis action, in- 
cluding the costs of Feb. IT, 1 90S, and 
Feb. 19, 1903, and of the motion and order 
permitting the defendants to deliver theil 
statement of defence, June 19, 1903, as 
between solicitor and client forthwith after 
taxation. 



S. Lebidensby, general merchant, Car- 
man. Man., is addrbg 10 feet in depth to 
lore to accoimnodute his growing 
business. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO, 

37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



LIMITED 

ONLY 
WHOLESALE 



Screen Doors^'Windows 




Style "H" 
Stained and ^ 



i»iyle ' M " 
Natural Finish, Oiled and Varnished. 

For Green Wove Wire and Spring Hinges 
See Our Hardware Catalogue. 




style •" H " 
Natural Finish, Oiled and Varnished. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. l.m,tid Toronto. 



OUR 



PRICES 

ARE RIGHT. 



Graham IMaiis ar© the Bes't. 

Factory: Duffsrlr Street, Toronto 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



Mot. I 



MACHINERY 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co,, Limited 

lynuncM >n>l Minora for all jmr 
■ an.i altcniatniK i-urrviiln S| M -t'ial 
ftttenl 

i 

I rlilll) Km n 



The Grey and Bruce Portland 
Cement Company of Shallow 
Lake, Limited, 

Manufacturers of 

4 'Hercules" and "Lion" Brands 

of 

PORTLAND CEMENT 

Unsurpassed for Sidewalks, Floors, and all 

work requiring the Highest Grade 

of Portland Cement. 

MEAD OFFICE : OWEN SOUND. 



"THE PEERLESS" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. Write U« for Prioet. 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 



BOX STRAPPING OF ALL KINDS 

Steel and Wire Box Straps, Flat, Plain] 
Embossed, or Twisted, with or without nai 
holes, in all widths and gauges. 




MANUFACTURED BY 

STANDARD METAL STRAP CO. 

336-342 East 38th St., 
cbi Ad£..s: ••nti .» NEW YORK, U.S.A. 




7J* 



A FEW OF THE LINES WE HANDLE : 




SHEPHIRD CLAMP VISE. 




Just to Remind You. 



We Carry a Large Stock. 
Prompt Shipment in all Lines. 



-4^ 



THE LA' iT ' 1 .J B'.ST 

THF C « HE* PAT EKT; 
ADv-U.V =<LE r.^ STOCKS 

iNOTUR. » ., BACK O v IK THFE/DS 
NO SKILL REO. ' 




L^L 



^ 



•f-^fi 




NEW PROCESS TWIST DH I L L S 



a 



IOCESS TWIST DJtIL 



C*.'U-*> 



o 




JACKSON 8 
SECTIONAL 
JAW-PIPE 
VISE 



UNIVERSAL HACK SAWS 



of any of thcw lilll « 



I'll K Pail IIS irhi'ii in ni'cil of any Of thine lim - W . , .,, 

jo'i well u-cuii-. WE CAREY THE SIX* K Bebd to • 



THE FAIRBANKS COMPANY 

a^l. "wnsmsriirPiEG!-- vajn"couver. 




1 1 



Mardwiirt- and 
Matul 




Perfection in Manufacture of Modern MacKine Tools 



Written especially for HARDWARE AND Mmai. by Geo. F. Bernard. 



ALL machinery, when analyzed, vvill 
be found to consist of a combine 
tion of six simple machines, con. 
monly known as mechanical elements. 
The six elements are, respectively, the 
lever, the pulley, the wheel and axle, the 
inclined plane, the wedge, the screw. 
Though they arc not powers, or sources 
of power, or force, yet they transmit and 
diffuse, or concentrate forces. As the 
writer set forth in a recent article, heat 
is a source of power, it is through the 
combination of the above mentioned six 
machines that power., after it has been 
generated, is capable of being- put to 
commercial use. Force is not created ; 
the object of machinery is to transmit it, 
and diffuse or concentrate it in one or 
more points of action. The various dif- 
fused or concentrated forces, then added 
together, will amount exactly to the 
original available force. 

Machines are instruments employed to 
regulate motion, so as to either save 
time or force. The maximum effect of 
machines is the greatest effect which can 
be produced by them* In all machines 
that work with a uniform motion there 
is a certain velocity and a certain load 
of resistance that yield the greatest ef- 
fect, and which are, therefore, more ad 
vantayeous than anv other. 

I here are in nature two extremes. 
lake, for instance, the heat of the sun 
and the cold of the earth ; the heat is 
one extreme the cold the other. Now 
combine these two extremes and form a 
perfect temperature, let us say 74 degrees 
Fahr. 

The same law applies in mechanics. If 
the machine is so heavily loaded that the 
met urn resulting from the application of 
any given power will be but just suffi- 
cient to overcome it. and, if any motion 
Cue. it will be very trifling, and the 
ole effect will be very slight. If the 
machine is verj lightly loaded, it may 
give great velocity to the load; but 
from the smallness of its quantity, the 
effect may still be very inconsiderable. 
Consequently between these two loads 
there must be some intermediate one that 
will render the effect the greatest pos- 
sible, just exactly as set forth in the 
above mentioned perfect point between 



the two extremes of temperature. This 

is also equally true to the application of 
animal Strength, 

There is, without doubt, no tool Used 
to day in modern machine shop practice 

which exemplifies the above to such an 

extent as the screw cutting engine lathe, 
which, when set up and operated proper 
ly, performs its work with a degree of 
perfection that is truly remarkable. 

On these modern tools the head is 
massive, but neatly designed, the cone 
pulley has five steps, the faces of which 
are extra wide, and the ratio of back 
gearing very high. The spindle is of 
crucible steel, and on the 1 I in. lathe. 
has a lj in. hole cunning through its 
entire length. The bearings, both front 
and back, are of a composition metal and 
are extra heavy. The spindles are 

ground, in order to insure their being 
absolutely round and straight. The 
thrust collars are of steel, hardened and 
ground. Especial care is taken to face 
the point with which they come in con- 
tact so that the bearing is absolutely 
true. The gears are of steel and are 
actuated by the gear on outer end of 
spindle. 

The tail-stock is shaped so that the 
compound rest may be set at an angle 
of 90 degrees, which permits the tool to 
be operated on the smallest diameter. 
Suitable screws are provided for setting 
the tail-stock sideways, and a two inch 
index graduated to sixteenths of an inch 
is cut on the base. The tail spindle is 
of large diameter and extra length. A 
new device is incorporated for clamping 
the tail-stock spindle without anv danger 
of throwino- it out of line. 

The carriage is extremely heavv and 
substantial, is provided with liberal slots, 
anil is gibbed to the bed its entire length. 
The bearing on the bed is not recessed, 
but has a full bearing from end to end 
and the entire depth of V on the bed. 
Instead of an inside V at the front of 
the lathe a flat is used on which the 
carriage bears ; this shortens the bridge 
of the carriage and insures a solid and 
substantial bearing immediately under 
the compound rest. The carriage is pro- 
vided with a screw and clamp for lock- 
ing it while using the cross-feed. 

The compound rest is in keeping with 

15 



the balance of the lathe. Moth upper 

and lower slides are lilted with taper 

L-ibs. which, besides being tapering, are 

tongued and grooved into the sides, SO 
that no amount of strain will displace 
them. 

The top slide is of good width. -,. that 
cutting may be done without projecting 
. the tool out away from the tool rest. 
The top slide with a long movement for 
angles, is fitted with a screw of suitable 
pitch. This screw is provided with an 
index micrometer, which reads in thoUB 
andths of an inch. When starting the cut 
an exact diameter may be obtained with 
out the use ..f calipers by usin^- the tail 
stock spindle as a gun 

For example, after the tool is firmly 
seemed in place, move it forward until 
the point touches the spindle ; the tool 
is then set to a diameter of spindle Bize. 
If smaller diameters are wanted, move 
forward, by means of the micrometer, 
the required distance. If larger diamet- 
ers are wanted. move^baekward in the 
same manner. 

One of the many points of excellence of 
this lathe is its screw-cutting feature. 
The change gears are mounted on a 
short shaft running in bearings in the 
bed and directly under the head stock. 
There is a knot in front of the head 
carrying a gear that continually runs 
either right or left. This gear may be 
dropped into any of the change gears 
instantly, and this gives four times as 
many changes as there are gears in the 
cone of gears, because on the outer end 
of the cone-gear shaft are four srears into 
any one of which the gear on the lead 
screw may engage. By this arrange- 
ment not a single gear need be removed 
to obtain the different threads or feeds 
on the index. There are a great many 
other featt -es which could be described, 
such as triple gearing, taper attachments, 
follow and steady rests, but I think the 
above will give a good idea of the lathe 
and its labor and time saving qualities. 
It would seem that to go one step far- 
ther and add any more to these lathes 
would be to reach the point where im- 
provement ceases to be of utility, and 
economy a factor. In fact they have 

about found their perfect point. 



Hardware 
Metal 



md 



MACHINERY 



THRESHERS' SUPPLIES. 

-Uatio^l. 

■ moius in 

: and are 

in the trade 

m M 1 1" N>'i thw i-l I .1 1 I 

' Inlario and I he Mail 

I he numbei oi oi del - 

..-.'II a 1 1 ade hat 

-W.-t I tluit ol former \ eai a 

i .\.--t the machines an- supplied 

wall self-feeders and cyclone stackers and 

■ uli much heavier than for this pro\ 

Ontario machines are being 

Lli . j i eat laboi Ba\ ing de 

u tin- waj "i a straw cuttej an. I 

blowei lli.' -lam i- fed iii just the 

a- formerly, Inn by improved ai 

ta« Inn. nt- straw i- all cut while passing 

through tin- machine ami carried into the 

mow all ready for feeding. \ great 

number of tlio machines for the west are 

mIm> supplied wiili fanning mills, weigher 

ami bagger, enabling the farmer to draw 

' .u ii direct from the machine to tli<' 

market. The linn intend enlarging yet 

further, ami no doubt in a few years The 

M. Doiialil Mfg. Co., of Stratford, will be 

among the foremost manufacturers of 

threshers' supplies. Stratford Beacon. 

ROLLER BEARINGS 

The Henderson Holler Bearing Co., Ltd., 
report that their factory is now complet 
ed and that they are overtaking their 
IS men are employed. The com- 
pany are littiiig up a street car of their 
own. equipped with the new bearing, 

which will he sent from city to city gi\ 

i practical demonstration of the 
operation of the bearing. The stock of 
the company ha- been full) subscribed 
am) tin- prospects for large business are 
very bright. 

THINKS WELL OF CANADIAN 
MARKET 

\ I; Jowitt, representing Thos. 
JowiU >\ Sons, Sheffield, Eng., manufac- 
turers of files, tool steel, etc., is in Can 
ad u in ih>- interests of his firm. In con 

iion with a representative of 'Hard 

war.- and Metal," ill Montreal. Mr. -low 

itt expr d himself a- highly pleased 

with tie- ..ntlook for Canadian trad.-. Be 
(perienced a most successful trip and 
returning home feeling impressed with 
the importance of the Canadian market 
whnh he -aid man\ English linn- were 
disposed to neglect. Mr. Jowitt spoke 
of tl»- surprising demand for high 

I In- i»-o|i|.-. he -aid. were dl- 
. t,, buy tie- v.-i\ best and in every 
pari of th>- country cheapei were 

led in their favor. Mi 
■ low itt'- lirm have been doing bu 
.n i anoxia foi man) yean and he 



that during nil that lime the lirm never 
lost a single dollar through bad ac- 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL 
NOTES 

''p BE Glacier Metal Co. New 5fork and 
London, hav< established an office 
at 320 St. dames street, Montreal, 
in order to facilitate the handling of 
their increasing trade in Canada. "Gla 
oier" is a high grade babbit, and is used 

in all parts of the world for high -|'ccd 
and hea\ \ iiiiiiiiiil: ma. Iini' 

The capacity of the foundr) of The 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Guelph, Out , is t<> be 
practical!} doubled. 

I he contract foi a 15, ,000 gallon 

Allis pumping engine has been closed bj 
Toronto with The John fnglis Co., of 
that city. 

The Foundry Co., of Lunenburg, \ .S . 
intend removing to North Sydne) in the 
latter part of the month. They are in- 
stalling a new boiler. 

( has 5 . Nellis has resigned from his 
position of superintendent of The Pratt 
Letchworth Malleable Iron Works, Brant 
ford. His successor has not yet been ap- 
pointed. 

Tin- Gasoline Engine Works, Toronto 
. I unction, Out., are placing- one of their 
. n Mies in a boat built by Henry Bridge- 
water, Orillia, (Int., for exhibition pur 

poses. 

Kramers an- installing sills for travell- 
ing .lanes iii the new foundry of The 
Owen Sound. ((Int., I Iron "Works Co. 
The machine shop of this company is 
200x45 feet. 

Moore & Sons, Meaford, (Int., will 
-pend 810,000 in developing a waterpower 
neai that place that, will furnish sillli 
cieiit power to operate all the machinery 
in that town. 

The Brantford Cordage Co., Brantford, 
(int., has received a consignment of new 
machinery. "s the factor)- is working 
overtime at present the machinery maj 
not be installed until after the season's 
rush. 

lli.- Collingwood Steel Shipbuilding Co. 
launched their third vessel at Colling 
wood, (Int.. on Saturday. The boat was 

christened the \\ . I). Matthews, and is 

390 feel over all. In another month the 

Midland Kim-, a boat of tin- same si/.-, 

will be r.-ad)- for launching, 

I he Goldie & McCulloch Co., Call. Ont., 

-hipped last week the frame of one of the 

1,500 horse power engines being built for 
I In- Cataract Powei I .. .>i Bamilton. It 
weighed IT ton and look three team of 

lo draw it. This is the largest 

engine ever shipped out of Gait. 

1 oulter iV Lvall. of The Standard Ma 

chine Works, Winnipeg, have removed 

their plant to the new -hop- ..I The 
Manitoba Iron Works, Ltd., on I 
L6 



avenue, The new shops are large and 

lir-t class, and the business will be con 

ducted on a much larger scale than pre- 
viously. 

The Ontario Wind Engine >\. Pump Co., 
manufacturers of tin- "Canadian Air 

Motor," stale that their Irade in Eng 

land, Cyprus, Egypt, India, South Airioa 

and South America is developing rapidl) 
I h.-ii windmill was not exhibited in the 
recent windmill test in London, Eng., 
where another Canadian windmill won 
lienors. 

Tin- Collingwood, (int., Shipbuilding Co 

have been awarded the contract foi a 
new Steel boiler for the steaiii.-i M acassa, 

of the Hamilton Line. The boiler will 
be twelve feet eight inches in length and 
twelve feet Ul diameter, and will be cap 

able of carrying a pressure of 160 pounds 
per inch It will be constructed of 

Scotch steel and is to be installed in the 
steamer in December next. 

Mr. Weber, of the Perry Co., is putting 
machinery to manufacture steam gauges 
in the store recently occupied bj Mi 
Harris, the tinsmith. Mi Weber has a 
Canadian patent and must manufacture 

the steam gauges here. Welland Tribune 
('apt. .). N. Wylde has installed a boil 
it and engine in his new mill at Port 
Medway, VS. The mill is now Hearing 
completion. 

lli.- American Silver iV, Brass Co., 117 
Bay street, Toronto, succeed The Can- 
adian Metal iV. Milling Co. The new com 
pany. of which Ii K. Hit/el is manager, 
will manufacture railway and steamship 
supplies of all sorts, wash. stands, wat.-i 
coolers, hot water and coffee urns, etc. ; 
also a general line of plumbers' supple- 
In addition the company will make cast 
ings of all descriptions in broii/e, bl 
silver and aluminum, This foundry is 

particularly well lilted to do this class ..i 
business. 

Cyrus H. McCormick, president of The 
International Barvester Co., mad.- a 
thorough inspection recently of the 

grounds, buildings and plant of the Ham 

ilton concern. Extensive additions are 

to be made to the buildings already 
erected, or in course of erection. Hamil 
ton papers are congratulating that rdt) 
that Mr. Me Oormiek's visit means that 
there will be one Canadian plant for all 
branches of the 1 1 ad.- and thai i( will 
be in Hamilton. 
The Sherbrooke, Que., Lumber Co. has 

recentl) I incorporated with a capital 

of $200,000, I., nun on a general lumbei 
I he company ow n between 400 

and .".(III square mile- of limb.'i limit! in 
'... p. . I'ortneiif. St. Maurice. Kiu.ouski 
and I pp.r Ottawa Kiver. The)- will 
I, iiil.l and operate -aw and pulp mills. 
II M. Price, the lumber millionaire of 
Quebec, i president and .J. A. Benn is; 
tary of the company. 



MACHIISER\ 



rdwarv bnd 



Hardware Dealers 

Ask your customers to bring to you 
their Spoons, Korks, Hollow-Ware once 

silver-plated, now scarcely fit for use. Act 
as my agent. I'll do a good job at ■< rea 
sonahle figure, and you can make a good 
commission, lust cut out this announce- 
ment and paste it on your calendar one 
month ahead. 

D. SUTHERLAND, 



12 Church St., 



Toronto. 



BARGAINS IN MACHlNtRY. 
(Sec ohaoga D6Zt I 
i PRIGHT DRILLING M M minks 
in in Priotkm l>i»k, Sutton. 
1 1 in Sennit Ive, Rlossberg New 
13 in Friction Cone, Knecht, N< n 
'.'ii in Plain Square Base, Barnes. \i » 
•in in Back Geared, 

23 in. 

.''.ii in Sliding Head, London, 
7'.' in Universal Radials, 

24 in. Sliding Bead, " Re-built. 

30 in. Boring ffTurnin* Mill, Bullarti, N.« 
CROM PL INERS 

• \ 11 n London. Ni ■ 

36 x Hi \ in ti 

60 x 60 v 16 n 

IJ \ t'J \ '.'ii ii Bttohburg. 
ROT \i;v PTJMJPB. 

V- ihmii ( Ireamer] . Taber, \< u 

Ho i«»il Water .\ Oil, Taber, v n 

So ii Tanneries \ Amis. Taber, Hen 

Ho i Soap "ii and Glue, Taber, 

Ho 2 Brewers, Taber, Nov, 

descriptions and catalogue "f null ft engineers 
supplie quest, 

H. W. PETRIE 

131-145 Kn.ni si. West, 8-22 Station si . Toronto. 




We Make 
Good 



VALVES 



Write for Catalogue 

It tells all about 

them. 



The Kerr Engine Co. 



Walkervllle, Ont, 



Blacksmiths' 

Hand 
Drills. 

The very 
best. 



B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 





No matte i n here youi l"i i 
we i .in impi m i i he lot . 

Metal Stampings 

arc Stronger, Lighter, Cheaper 
than Castings. 



^vw%/» 



We work Sheet Steel, Brass, 
Aluminum and Copper to any 
shape. 

Send us your samples and num- 
ber required, and we will quote 
prices on same 

ROY DODbONS PATENT HAMECHA1NS. MAlYllMJ 1JN KMuM . 

Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co., 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 



■Limited 



USE 



CANADIAN BABBIT 



Imperial 
■Vle-teftllic 



Hercules 
Star 



The highest grade babbits made. 



THE CANADA METAL CO., ""MY.' TORONTO. 



COLD PRESSED NUTS 



of all shapes and sizes, finished, semi- /S 
finished, case hardened, plated or 

I m dished. 





Canada Foundry Company, Limited, 

14-16 King Street East, - - TORONTO, 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. HJgB33Sfi& ,M **- *" 

17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A 



RAT PORTAGE, Ontario, despatch 



mi: .ions in the Bagle Lake 

district. The pure! Bingham, 

oi Wilmington, Delaware, and the seller N. 

-ee, of Kat Portage. Mr. Bingham lias 
organized The Vermillion Bay Mines Co., 
with headquarter! at Wilmington. This 
company will take over the purchase and 
active operations will begin at once. 

The Canada Wood M anufacturing Com- 
pany, of Farnham, Oue., is installing a large 
furniture plant. 

The capital stock of The Auer Incandes- 
cent Light Manufacturing Co., Limited, has 
been reduced from $500,000 to $100,000. 

Rapid progress has been made on the 
new cement factory now being built at 
Wiarton, Ont. The management find diffi- 
culty in securing men. 

It is reported that the Great Northern 
has decided to extend their line from 
Morrissey to Michel, B. C, and that work 
will commence within 30 days. 

The Maritime Merchant reports a con- 
siderable increase in the output of coal at 
Port Hood, N.S. Difficulty is found in 
making the supply equal the increasing 
demand. 

The June output of The Dominion Coal 
Co. amounted to 283,300 tons, an increase 
of 7,000 tons over the corresponding month 
of 1902, and 20,000 tons more than for 
May, 1903. . 

The new saw-mill which theShives Lum- 
ber Co. are building in Campbellton, N. B., 
will be the largest in the Maritime Pro- 
vinces. The mill is to have the most mod- 
ern equipment. 

Gold and silver may be smelted and 
refined in Winnipeg. Amor Amasen, 644 
Elgin avenue, announces that he will do a 
general refining and smelting business, in- 
cluding the testing of ores. 

Jacob Purmal, brick manufacturer, of 
Medicine Hat. X. W. T., contemplates an 
extensive addition to his plant, as he is at 
present unable to make the output equal 
the demand for Medicine Hat red brick. 

The Kingston and Pembroke Railway 
have received an extension of time for the 
completion of their road. At least 10 miles 
must be constructed within 18 months, and 
the road must be completed within five 
years. 

An extension of the Grand River Yallev 
electric road, giving Guelph connection with 
Puslinch Lake and Hespeler, is proposed by 
Dr. S. Ritter Ickes, proprietor of the road. 
His proposition has been accepted by the 
Railway Committee. 



Work on the Tamiskaming and North- 
ern Ontario Railway is proceeding rapidly. 
B. S. Scnkler, solicitor of the road, is re- 
ported by The Toronto Globe as Baying 

that steel is now being laid at the rate of 
almost a mile a day. 

A New Westminster despatch says that 
the former employes of the Royal City 
Mills factory, who went out on strike some 
weeks ago for a nine-hour day, have decided 
to build and operate a factory of their own 
on a co operative plan. 

The Dowd Milling Co., Limited, have 
been granted increased powers enabling 
them to engage in the generation and 
development of electricity, electrical power, 
electric light, etc., also to manufacture 
lumber and building material generally. 

The Blaine Harrow Manufacturing Co., 
Limited, Toronto, have been incorporated 
with a capital of $100,000 to manufacture 
and deal in harrows and other agricul- 
tural implements; directors, G. E. Blaine, 
Geo. Clatworthy, Alexander Keith, John 
Buchanan. 

The decision of the Dominion Govern- 
ment to grant a bounty of $15 per ton on 
smelted lead is hailed with pleasure by the 
mine owners of the Kootenay District. 
Several influential owners predict that 
within a month several of the lead mines of 
Kootenay, now closed, will be re-opened 
and worked. 

The Gold King Consolidated Mine Co. 
met recently, at Waterville, N. B Returns 
for quarter ending May 31 were very 
favorable. An addition of $100,000 was 
made to the reserve fund and a new corpor- 
ation, under the name of The Gold Prince 
Mines was organized, with a capital of 
$3,000,000. 

Berlin, Ont., expects an additional iron 
working establishment for the manufacture 
of heating boilers and other specialties. 
General foundry work will also be done. 
Mr. Philip Gies, of Berlin, and a number of 
well-known Berlin and Gait men are behind 
the project. The company is to be known 
as The Berlin Foundry Co. 

The C.P.R. will have increased elevator 
capacity for handling this season's western 
crop. Extensive alterations and improve- 
ments are now being made at Fort William, 
and when they are completed the company 
will have one elevator there with a capacity 
of 6.000,000 bushels. There is also great 
activity in the construction of cars. 

A new mica industry was recently estab- 

ished in Ottawa by The Wallingford Mica 

and Mining Co. This firm, which has a 

capital of over half a million, has purchased 

18 



the mica mining property situated in Tem- 
pleton and Hull townships and owned bv 
Messrs .Wallingford, Cursolles and Belcourt, 
M.l'. They propose continuing operations 
on a large scale. 

An Ottawa despatch says that F. 11. 
Clergue and others representing The Lake 
Superior Consolidated Co., Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont., interviewed the Government a 
few days ago, asking that the proposed in- 
crease of bounty should also apply to iron 
made from ore procured in the United 
States, large quantities of which are used 
at the " Soo " works. 

The Truro Condensed Milk Co., Limited, 
Truro, N. S., has been incorporated with a 
capital of $800,000 to engage in the manu- 
facture and sale of condensed milk, coffee, 
cocoa, fruit, vegetables, fish, etc., and to 
buy and sell cheese, butter and other farm 
products. The directors are D. II. Muir, 
M.D., Truro; S. H. Holmes, Halifax; Mar- 
tin Dickie, Truro; R. J. Turner, Truro; 
George E. Faulkner, Halifax. 

Work on the new Collingwood dry-dock 
is rapidly progressing. When completed 
this Autumn it will be the best equipped 
dock on the great lakes. It is built entirely 
with cement and stone. The demensions 
of the dock are as follows: — Length, 530 
feet over all; width of entrance, 60 feet : 
width of dock at top, 78 feet ; width of 
dock at bottom, 50 feet; depth of water 
over sill, 17 feet; depth of water in dock, 
21 feet. 

The Ewart Company, Limited, Mont- 
real, have been incorporated with a $90,- 
000 capital to acquire from John T. Ewart, 
Montreal, his fuel, ice cartage and general 
business, and to carry on the business of 
colliery proprietors, miners of coal, manu- 
facturers of and dealers in patent fuel and 
in artificial and natural ice. The directors 
are John Farquharson, G. M. Webster, 
Lorenzo Prince, J. T. Ewart, William John- 
ston, Ferdinand Bayard, D. M. Lockerby, 
F. X. St. Onge, George Maybury. 



FOUNDRY OR MACHINE SHOP 
WANTED. 

If some enterprising person with sufli- 
cient capital would undertake to estab- 
lish a foundry or machine shop at 
North Bay, we venture the assertion that 
it would prove a paying investment. 
Whenever any work in that line is re 
quired it has to be sent to outside 
places, or is done by favor of the CP. 
!>' Co., and a large amount of work goes 
out of town in this way. Were a foun- 
dry established here this work would be 

and a large trade i 
be worked up in the country west of 
• hich is now done in other places. 

North Bay I in • 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




DODQB\ 



Looking for Money? 



You'll find it back of the Dodge Line of power transmission supplies 
which offers attractive trade-getting advantages to hard- 
ware dealers. 



Dodge Wood Split Pulleys are the standard of the world, and, just 
as other Dodge appliances, are in daily demand throughout 
the Dominion. 

The Dodge line of pulleys, wood and iron shafting, belting and 
kindred appliances is offered to enterprising dealers on very 
special terms. 

Better write to-day for our offer. 

DODGE MFG. CO. OF TORONTO, LIMITED 

t TORONTO, ONT. 




HARDWARE NOVELTY. 




THE 




American Watches. 



RETAIL 
PRICES, 



$1.25 to $2.50 



ARGUMENT. 



We now offer a practical time piece for the Hardware Trade of Canada, 
and base our statement upon the following : 

First— It is absolutely guaranteed to keep accurate time. 

Second— It stands rough usage and does not get out of order easily, 
making it the only watch for dealers outside of the jewelery trade to 
handle, and also making it a practical one for sportsmen, boys and all 
men who give a watch hard usage. 

Third— Its low price and high quality insure a tremendous sale, which 
we further augment by furnishing many handsome advertising devices 
for your store. 

Fourth— Last but not least, these watches offer a handsome profit. 
Price cutters are not supplied. 

Sold by several leading Hardware Jobbers of Canada. We will tell 
you who they are upon request. 

Trial Offer -To any Hardware Merchant who will write to us upon his 
business letter head and inclose 75c. we will send a sample watch (duty 
not paid) and our catalogue, so that he can test its accuracy and durability. 

INFORMATION ON REQUEST. 

ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO. 



CANADA SCREW COMPANY, 



HAMILTON 



TORONTO 




MONTREAL 



Ask for our 

Wood Screws, 
Machine Screws, 
Tire Bolts, 
Stove Bolts, 
Rivets, 



Wire Nails, 
Screw Eyes, 
Screw Hooks, 
Gate Hooks 
and Eyes. 



5i-53 flalden Lane, 



NEW YORK. U.S.A. 



Specials of all kinds. 






PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Lucas Greens 



arc clear, fresh, brilliant, and exceptionally 
the best in fineness of texture, body, or cover- 
ing capacity and durability. 

They're acknowledged as the " Old 
Reliable" throughout the United States, 
Canada and the West Indies. 

Beware of counterfeits. None gen- 
uinewithout the Lucas brand stamped in the 
head of every package. Dry and in oil. 

Write to-day for Samples and Prices. 



J0I1N LUCAS & CO. 

Paint, \arnish and Color Manufacturers 

New York Philadelphia Chicago 



LINSEED 01 



Raw and Boiled 

"GUARANTEED PURE" 



M\M I Vl'll IMI> BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 

MONTREAL. 



LIMITE D 



BARRELS WANTED!! 



We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels 



LUXFER 
PRISMS... 



The secret of selling goods is 
to KNOW what a man wants. 



You WAN TaGOOD, LIGHT STORK 



We KNOW it and can make 
it so for you. 



Do Not be Misled by Cheap Imitations. 



We can give you cheap f^lass. 
We will give you bi^ value 
for every dollar invested in.. 

LUXFER PRISMS. 

DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO. 



LIMITED 



100 King St. West, TORONTO. 

Montreal Agency : P. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig^St. 



FOR 



GLASS 

STORE 
FRONTS 



We make a speeialty of all glass mat dials for 
the latest, most up-to-date 

STORE FRONTS AND 

INTERIOR DECORATION 



WILL SEND DESIGNS. 



DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO., 



LIMITED 



100 King Street West, TORONTO 

Montreal Agency: F. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig St. 



20 



Hardware and 

Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



PAINTING TRADE IN TORONTO 

r |^ III. condition oi the painting trade 
in Toronto serves to present a 
striking inst ance of i be bai op 1 1 »« • 
union agitator may do, ao1 only to the 
employers of labor, Inn to the working 
men themselves and to all parties direct 
ly and indirectly affected. 

For some years the Toronto Painters' 
Union lias been increasing steadily in 
numbers and in its Influence on its mem- 
bers, the journeymen painters. ( hi.- re 
-nit has been thai each Bpring they have 
approached t In- master painters demand 
ing an increase in wages. On several 
occasions the latter, believing that the 
rapid expansion of Toronto and the eon 
sequent increase of building operations 
would make it possible to gel from build 
ers the advance made necessary by high 
er wages and the higher cost of materials, 
granted the requesl of the men. 

Bach increase in wages secured by the 
union strengthened its power over the 
men and its confidence in its influence 
with t In- masters. 

This spring brought on the crisis, and 
the action of the union has turned that 
crisis into disaster for itself and embar 
rassmenl to everyone interested in build 
iul 1 operations in Toronto, An advance 
to 36c per hour was asked by the men. 
\fter some trouble a tentative agreement 
was ultimately reached, whereby the mas 
ters agreed to pay that wage for the 
present. Almost at once the effect was 
noticeable: tenders were, in ease after 
ease, turned down by architects and 
builders, the sole reason being "prices; 

too high." In a few weeks it was made 
clear to the masters that the last 5c per 

hour was the additional "straw which 
broke the camel's back." causing the loss 
of orders right and left. 

The Master Painters' Association there- 
upon placed the matter before the union ; 
explained the situation fully and frankly. 
Hut the men were obdurate. They Were 
not convinced that the falling off in husi 
ness was due to the high prices, and the\ 

felt enough confidence in their organiza 

tion to attempt to "hold-Up" tie- ma- 

ters tor 35c an hour. Several conferences 
were held but none were satisfactory 
Ultimately negotiations were broken off 
and it has become a fight to the finish, 
with the advantage ' altogether with the 
masters. 

Business ha- become so reduced in vol 
nine, that although then- are jeveral 
hundred of union men idle, the majority 



of the masters have enoimh men I.. 

plete t hen c,,ut roots ; the ma tei have 
completed a strong organization, pledged 
not only to paj .i maximum of 30c pei 

hour, bill to protect from the anno 

of union men. their employes. Painters 
ate arriving in Toronto from the towns 

and cities in Ontario, from '■rent Britain 
and in some cases from the I nited St 

The masters ha\e recognized now that In 
stead of being dictated to bj the union, 
they need not fear them hereafter an I 
are pledged to give the preference in the 

years to come to the men who are rea 

sonable toilav. Thus has one union lost 
its o tip. The lesson may well be taken 
to heart by ot hfel 



THE USE OF WATER PAINTS. 

AS a preparatory coat on all old and 
greasy w ork the use of a goo 
water paint can be recommended, 

-ay.- The I'lumber and Decorator. Take 
window sushes for an example. I nless 
thoroughly washed ami cleaned, our 
practical readers know that tin- places 
where paint, no matter how sharp, in- 
variably misses drying, are on the meet- 
ing rails and underneath the top sash. 
There is trouble then, for in many in- 
stances they have to be washed off with 
turps ami knotted a great waste of 
time ami material. One coat of water 
paint suitably tinted prevents this, as it 
will dry on all surfaces and form an c\ 
cellent ground for the finishing coat of 
oil color. 

We have been asked, " Is it possible to 
stain water paints with oil stainers '.'" 
Yes, it can be done. For all light tints, 
such as those used for picking out, cor- 
nice, etc.. the ordinary dry stainers, well 
paletted up. maj be used, but must be 
carefully strained. When a great quan- 
tity of dark color is to be used it is 
safer to order the tint or color required 
from the manufacturer, as too much dry 

stainers interferes with the binding pro 
perties. If it is desired, however, to use 

a heavy tint, take the necessary oil stain 
ers and well palette up on the slab with 
the least possible quantity of soft soap ; 
then add slowly to the water paint in 
bulk, ('are must be taken to use as little 
soap as possible, otherwise the color will 
run. 

Experience has also shown that for ex- 
ternal work, or outside work much e\ 
posed to the weather, it is desirable to 
mi\ oil with the water paint, the ipian 
21 



tity given by an expert to be one pint 

i oil to a quarter of a hun 

dredweight of t he t iii « atei paint. The 

waj to do tin to en 
amalgamation is to warm the watei 

paint until in a semi liquid state, and 
slow Iv add the oil. a little at a time, tin 

id well mixed, then thinning with the 

liquid especially manufactured. 

Let ii- now consider another mistake' 

painter- make in using water paint 

They will apply them to perfectly new 
and green walls, and then ni a few days 

follow on with ordinary oil paint. What 

is the consequence? 'The damp is im 

prisoned; slowly ami surely the paint 

ers ; and tln-n a rooted objection is 
formed against then further use. If a 

man is determined to use oil paint on a 

new wall, then there is no advanta 
i» gained by using water paints 
first coating. 
In a case Buch as this begin with the 

water paint and end with it. In COUrSi 
of time the wall will become perfectly 
dry. as these materials are porous, and 
allow the moisture in the walls to di v 
out without in any way injuring the sur 
face color. When the walls are thorough 
ly dry, then is the time to use oil or 
spirit color, there being no necessitj for 
washing off. as the water paint, if a 

good one. makes a mosl excellent Tiller; 

and all that is necessary before painting 
with oil color is to well rub dow.n and 
smooth the surface with glasspaper. 

In every way the use of reliable water 

paints should be encouraged on new work 
and on old as an excellent basis for the 
finishmg coats ,,f oil color. 'The purity 
of the tints are superior to the mo-t 
delicate flatting colors, ami their sanitaiA 
value is unquestionable. Thev will never 
take i he place ,,f genuine white lead, but 

still for many pur] -. and for rapidly 

getting over the work in the shot te t 
possible time, they have much in their 

fn\ oi 

PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 
MONTREAL. 

THERE is quite an active businsE 
doing in this department for the 
season. Trice- generally are steady 
ami there is a Tinner tendency on Paris 
green, which continues in very activi 
mand. 

GROUND WHITE LEAD.-Best brands, 
Government standard, {5 to *o.25 • No. 
1, 84.27* to 84.87*; No _', $1.40 to 
S4.50 ; No. 3, 84.02* to 14,12* ; No. 4, 
93.65 to J3.75, all f.o.b. Montreal. Terms, 



off for 

DRY Wit ' ,l,ul 

\)\i\ WB lr >- >» < '" sl \ !4, 

VN j I . in oil)— I'ur' 

tb. i. ' -■ to ' 

,.,■ ! ta : B«lk. in L-arrels. 

kages, 11.85 ; 

[NERAL.-CaskB, 7c; 100- 
aller quantities, bjc 

line red lead, in casks, 
tb kec »' '«? 

lead, ,0 and sma11 

LITII VRGE.— Ground tasks, 3c. ; in less 
quantitie Bake ^harge, casks, 

K 75 per 100 tb. 
1 [NSEED OIL.— Baw, 1 to -1 bbls., 57c; 

rKm > '"' fc0 9 , ' ,bla .A f b °'' 
boiled 59c. Terms, net cash in JO days 
Delivered in Ontario, between Montreal 
and Oahawa. at 2c. per gallon advance. 

n RPENTINE.— Single bbls., 75c; 2 to 
1 bbla., 74c rerms, net cash in 30 days. 

BENZINE.— 25 to '26c. 
SHELLAC VARNISH.— Pure white, 
5 ; orange, *'2.10 to S'2.25. 

Ml\l I) PAINTS to 81.40 per 

gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— 8j to '.Uc. in wholesale 
lots, and Jc additional for small lots. 

SEAL OIL.— 48 to 50c. 

COD OIL.— 35 to 374c. 

PURE CANADIAN PARIS GREEN- 

IVroleuin barrels. I5jc per lb. ; arsenic 
kegs, 154c; 50 and 100 It), drums, 16c. ; 
25-tb. drums. IGAc.; 1 - tb. packages, 17c; 
4-lb. packages, 19c ; 1 tb. tins, 16c; ^-tb. 
tins, 20c 

PURE ENGLISH PARIS GREEN.- 

oleum barrels, 14$c; arsenic kegs, 

I4ic; 60 and 100-tb. drums, 15c; 25-tb. 

drums. !"*i<-.; I lb. paper boxes, 16c; 

I lb. tins. 17c 



tORON ro. 
A fair demand is noted for sundries, 
but the business in -tapir- is light, Lin- 
ed oil has weakened materially, and is 
quoted 2c lower. Other prices are 
uii W e quote : 

WHITE LEAD.— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, 15.10 to 15.25. No. I, 11.62) to 
U 874 ; No. 2, $4.25 to 84.50 ; No. 3, 
$3,874 to 8-1.124; No. 4, $3.50 to $3.75 
in packages of 2o-lb. and upwards ; 4 C - 
I er lb. extra will be charged for 12^-Ib. 
packa-."-* ; genuine dry white lead, in 
casks, 85.024. 

RED LEAD.— Genuine, in casks of 560 

# tb., $1 .76 I $5 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 tb., 

$5.25 to $5.50 ; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb., 

$4 to $4.25 ; ditto, in kegs of 100 tb., 

$4.25 to $4.50. 

LITHARGE.— Genuine, 6 to 64c. 

WHITK ZINC— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 

SHINGLE STAIN.— In five-gallon lots, 
60 to 85c per gallon. 
PARIS WHITE.— 90o. to $1 per 100 tb. 

Will TING. -65c per 100 tb ; Gilders' 
Aiming, 80c 

GUM SHELLAC.— In cases, 35 to 37c; 
in less than cases, 40 to 42c per tb. 

LIQUID SHELLAC— Pure orange, in 
bbls., 82.30 to $2.40 ; white, $2.35 to 
per gallon ; in less quantities, 10c. 
extra. 

GLUES.— Broken sheet, in 200-tb. bbls., 
8 to s.$c. per lb ; cabinet glue, in bbls., 
114 to 12c; emery glue, in bbls., 17c ; 
bookbinders', ground, 104c; finest Amer- 
ican, white, 19c ; No. 1 American white, 
15c per rb. 

PUTTY— Bladders, in barrels, $2.10; 
bladders, in 100-lb. kegs, 82.25 ; bulk in 
barrels, 81-80 ; bulk, less than barrels, 
and up to 100 tb., S2.05 ; bladders, bulk 
or tins, less than 100 tb.. $2.75. 

PARIS GREEN— Petroleum bbls., 13 
to 154c per lb.; arsenic kegs, 134 to 
154c; 50 and 100-tb. drums, 14 to 16c; 
25-Ib. drums, 144 to 164c; 1 -tb. packages 
154 to 17c; 4-tb. packages, 17 to 18c ; 
lib. tins, 16 to 18c; 4-tb. tins, 17 to 
19c 

PLASTER PARIS.-New Brunswick, $2 
per barrel. 

PUMICE STONE.— Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 4 to 5c per lb. in less 
quantity ; lump, 10c in small lots and 
8c in bbls. 

LIQUID PAINTS.— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c per gallon. 

CASTOR OIL.— English, in cases, 8 to 
9c per tb. j and 9 to 10c for single tins. 

LINSEED OIL.— Raw, I to 2 bbls., 58c 
boiled, 61c; 3 to 5 barresl, raw, 60c 
boiled. 61c; 3 to 5 barrels, raw, 60c. 
boiled, 61c delivered. To Toronto, Earn 



ilton and London, 2c less. All quanti- 
ties of 10 bands and over of linseed oil 
sold only f.o.b., Toronto, Hamilton, Lou 

don and Guelph. 

II RPENTINE. Single barrels, 75o.j 
2 t«> 3 bbls., 74c delivered. Toronto, Ham 
ilton and London. 2c leSS. For less qiianti 
ties than barrels, 5c per gallon extra 
will be added, and for 5-gallon packages, 
50c. and 10-gallon packages, 80c will be 
charged. 

WINDOW GLASS 
MONTREAL. 

There is no change in window glass, 

and only a moderate volume Of trade is 

passing. We quote as follows: First 
break, 50 ft.. $2; second break, $2.10 for 
50 ft.: first break 100 ft.. $3T80 . second 
break, $4 ; third break, $4.50 ; fourth 
break, $4.75. 

TORON TO. 
A fair trade doing : prices ani hanged. 

Import orders arc practically all deli\ 
ered. We quote : Star, under 26 in., 
$3.80; 26 to 40-in., $4; 41 to 50 in . 
$4.50 : 51 to 60 in., $4.75 : 61 to 70 in . 
$5; 71 to SO in.. $5.50. Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London. Terms, four months, 

BUSY BRANDON. 
\ I'.RANDON. Man., correspondent 

J-\ gives a list of articles manufac- 
tured in that busy town as fol- 
lows : Threshing engines, boilers, chemi 
cal fire engines, fanning mills, carriages, 
pumps, monuments, bricks, tents, awn 
ing's, overalls, binder twine, harness, tan- 
ned hides, fur coats, fur robes, fur mitts. 
dressed lumber, doors, sashes, mouldings, 
flour, oatmeal, pickles, creamery butter, 
beer, pop, ginger ale. There are three 
ruins [manufacturing harness, two manu 
facturing pumps, and two dressed lum- 
ber. 



YOD TAKE NO CHANCES 

IF YOU HANDLE 

"ANCHOR" LIQUID PAINT. 

Our years of experience in paint making;, modern factories and the 
use of the best white lead in the world—BRANDRAM'S B.B. GENUINE 
combine to produce a paint that is not equalled by any other. 



ANCHOR HAT ENAMEL, the original and on y 
genuine. Price 84c. per doz ; retails at lOc.each. 



HENDERSON k POTTS r < 



C*° B *?T 





TRADE MARK 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ON I ARIO. 

DOHERTY & WILLIAMSON, harn- 
ess, etc., have assigned to A. 11. 
Baker, Picton. Ameeting of the creditors 
will ho held on the I Ith July. 

C, P. Hoi ton, lumber merchant, Belle- 
ville, was burn! out. 

A meeting of the creditors of Wm. Mose, 
harness, (.ionic, will be held on July loth. 

s. \|. Kenney, of The McLachlan Gas- 
oline EngineCo., Ltd., roronto, and V\'. 
Galbraith, wholesale grocer, Belleville, 
have interchanged their business connec- 
tions, certainly an unusual and interesting 
circumstance. 

QTJEBE< . 

Daniel Murphy, saddler, Montreal, is 
deceased . 

Thomas A. Cousins, pulp wood, etc,, 
St. Johns, is deceased. 

rludon A- Augustin, machinists, St. 
Hyacinthe, is deceased. 

Robitaille, Trudel & Kochette, carriage 
makers, Quebec, have dissolved. 

Duclos & Roth, contractors, Montreal. 
have dissolved; new registration. 

The assets of T. Vallee, sash and door 
manufacturer, St. Thccle, are to he sold. 

F. X. Letourneau, sawmill, Ste. Fan- 
eille (Montmorency county), is deceased. 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

The Mah-I'u Mineral Springs Co., Ltd., 
I 'pham, are applying foi incorporation, 

The Elgin Milling Co., Ltd., Elgin, are 
applying for an incorporation, capital 
$15,000. 

Muii.n iV Gregory, sawmill and manu- 
facturers lumber, St, John, had the saw- 
mill hunted out ; insurance $23,000. 

MANITOBA AND NORTH WES1 TERRITORIES. 

A. Urquhart, hardware merchant, Yel- 
low C iraSS, lias sold out, 

Campbell iV- Ferguson, Ltd., lumber, 
Melita, have been incorporated. 

James M. Johnston, agricultural im- 
plements, Carstairs, is starting in business. 

G. 11. Knowling, lumber, Alameda, 
has sold out to The Imperial Elevator 
Co. 

Charles A. Sankey, lumber, Waskada, 
has sold out to The Imperial Elevator 
Co. 

Thomas Miller, hotel and lumber, 
Carroll, has sold his hotel to George 
Barton. 

Stewart Bros., hardware, lumber and 
implements, Rosenfeld, have sold lumber 
to The Imperial Elevator Co. 

The Brandon Hinder Twine Co., Ltd., 
Brandon, have made application to in- 
crease capital from $100,000 to $200,000. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

A meeting of the creditors of the Hast- 
ings Shingle Manufacturing Company, 
Ltd., Vancouver, will be held. 



TRADE 




JiTobles 8f Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers ot 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the work* 
or from the principal Color Dealers* in Canada. 



' w± 




Manufacturers of FINE READY MIXED PAINTS, 

FLOOR PAINTS and VARNISHES, and WHITE 

LEAD. Full line of best DRY COLORS, OILS, 

\ and all PAINTER REQUISITES always in stock. 
i 

end for prices. 



The Globe Paint Co., 





SOLE MAKERS 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



Limited 



422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 



LTD 



23 



M » r il w • r t* tnd 

Mrl.l 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



THE IDEAL FOUNDRY. 
^T"Muv question has often been asked, and 
ips u lias never been properly 
ivered, "Why are foundries usually 
,I;hk .iiul badly ventilated ?" Ponndries 
v all shapes and sizes on 
i ii t ofthegreal variety of work which 
has to be undertaken in them, and in many 
ises the foundry forms a small and unim- 
portant part .4 a much larger firm. This 
however, why the claims of 
those who work in them should be over- 
looked, and we are glad l<> sir thai the 
question has again been brought to the 
front liv Professor Turner, who gave an 
interesting and extremely useful address on 
•The [deal Foundrv" in the Chemistry 
Theatre ot the Birmingham University on 
Thursday night. The ideal foundrv, he 
said, should he constructed on a large site, 
with ready access to rail and water; should 
lie rectangular in plan, and provided with 
tram lines. There should he traversing 
cranes, and a sufficient supply of jih cranes 
for the work in hand. Further, the foundry 
should he well lighted and ventilated and, 
if necessary, warmed in winter. He strongly 
urged that more attention should he given 
to the sanitary arrangements of the foun- 
dries, believing that by these means the 
health of the working man would he im- 
proved. Too often the men left work with- 
out any attempt at washing their hands or 
changing their clothes, and were quite 
unfit to ride in tramcars or other public 
conveyances. This was not the case in 
France or Germany, were workingmen had 
sufficient self-respect to induce them to make 
themselves respectable before leaving the 
works." — Iron and Steel Trades Journal. 

HAVE FAITH IN CANADA. 
The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, To- 
ronto, in their new catalogue, have the fol- 
lowing reference to the industrial condition 
of Canada as a preface: "When the history 

inadian industries comes to he written, 
there will he certain epochs noted, and per- 
haps the rapid development of to-day will 
l>e considered the most important. It is 
certain that the marvellous development of 
the agricultural industries of the North- 

. with its consequent larj^c increase in 
population and expansion of railways and 
other transportation facilities, has occa- 
sioned and been accompanied by a corres- 
ponding demand for all classes of manufac- 
tured products. This sudden and imperative 
call has taxed manufacturing facilities in 
most lines to the utmost of their capabilities, 
and in some instances, as in our own, it has 



been found quite impossible, with existing 
plant, to meet the radical requirement of 
the case. As will he seen by the illustration 
on the tliird page of thiscatalogue, showiiig 
our new additional plant at Toronto Junc- 
tion, we have faith in the destiny of Canada 
as a manufacturing country, and we have 
met a serious situation in no hesitating 
spirit, hut with a broad, enterprising ap- 
preciation of the new conditions existing in 
Canada. We hope to have practical 
evidence of the appreciation of our friends 
in a continuance of their patronage." 

A GOOD SPIRIT LAMP. 

THE -Standard Chemical Co., Limited, 
Gooderham Building, Toronto, are 
selling a brass spirit lamp of superior 
merit, made in two sizes, to retail at 50c. 
and Toe. This lamp is particularly well 
adapted for hospital or sick-room use and 
for the nursery. It is a capital article, too, 
for the kitchen for toasting, frying steak, 




etc., making tea, and the dozeu and one 
things for which a gas hot-plateis so useful. 
It hums wood alcohol, a powerful spirit, 
smokeless, of intrinsic heating quality, non- 
explosive, and less volatile than gasoline. 
Hardware dealers will find this stove an 
admirable article to offer their customers, 
especially those who are denied the blessing 
of gas. 

THE WESTERN FOUNDRY CO 

F.J. Taylor, of The Western Foundry Co., 
Limited, Wingham, Out., while in Toronto 
this week stated to HARDWARE and Metai, 
that the item in last week's issue was 
somewhat misleading, for though the works 
were closed down for some days it was to 
give the employes, ma iy of whom were 
Toronto men, an opportunity to visit that 
city during the Home Comers' Festival. 
The trouble with the workmen is not incon- 
veniencing the company in the operation of 
their works. The business of the company 
i- steadily growing. Not only have their 
■1\ 



stoves obtained an excellent reputation 
throughout Ontario, but are now being 
sold abroad. This week a substantial 
order was sent to near Liverpool, England. 

ASBESTOS COVERINGS FOR PIPES 

Heat economy is a subject of interest to 
every householder, but comparatively few 
furnace users appreciate the value of insu- 
lated pipes. Asbestos coverings are very 
common in all large manufacturing plants 
where the conveyance of heat without waste 
is a serious problem. The Eureka Mineral 
Wool an J Asbestos Co., 130 Bay street, 
Toronto, sell asbestos coverings, hut their 
mineral wool is claimed by its users to be 
even a better preserver of heat. 

CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

The Gurney 0a tlogue fur i:to3-4. 
We have just received from The Gurney 
Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto, Out., their 
illustrated catalogue and price list for 
1093-4, which is an exceptionally handsome 
publication. It is well printed on excellent 
paper, and the engravings with which it is 
profusely illustrated could not he better. 
The company offer to the trade an extensive 
variety of ranges, heaters, radiators, furn- 
aces, etc., and the advantages of their 
different lines are clearly explained in the 
catalogue just issued. The products of this 
firm have maintained such a high standard 
that almost all stovemen handle their 
wares. This handsome catalogue should 
increase their business and prove a great 
convenience to the trade. Any reader of 
Hardware and Metai. may obtain a copy 
of this valuable catalogue by applying to 
The Gurney Foundrv Co., Limited. The 
work should be of much value for reference. 

Imperial Standard Scales. 
The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co. 
Limited, Hamilton, Ont., have the reputa- 
tion of being a progressive, pushing firm. 
They hav£ recently issued a new catalogue 
of their Imperial standard scales which 
should be of interest to the trade. It is 
well illustrated throughout, and all the 
lines are fully described. The company will 
be pleased to send a copy of this catalogue 
to any reader of Hardware and Metai. 
upon application. 

NOTES OF THE TRADE. 

The addition to the new Buck stove 
works is rapidly being built. The 
walls are nearly completed now, and it is 
expected that the work will he finished 
Within a few months. The firm desire to 
move from the old shops by the Fall.— 
Brantford Courier. 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf! 

Thai ■ whal ■ ihell braokel li for. 
!''"!■ iin i purpo ii then ou be Notb i wo Bi i 
ter. Nothing Chi ipkb than thi BH U>LEY 
STEEL BRACKET li ia wi n Japanned, Rtrong 

ana Light The saving In freight is o n I profit, 

aside from the lowei prlci al which the | 

sow Order direct o* through \ 

ATLAS MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 

Have you 
tried it ? 



Tried what ? 



W\ 'I" no! iin. ,n to mi 
ainuate thai you are bald 
i" "I'll, bul il you an 
and wish in advertise the 
i.i' il . oar itir cushion rub 
bar stamps will prove a 
luxury; you "in Infer thai 
they print equally well mi 

any i ven surface; this 

will go u long way in show 
thai vim bead is level 
We Invite dlfficull si,-. I 
stamp wnrk. iimi try t" 
please our oustomei • 
Have you got one "i our 

'l.'S ■ 



Hamilton 
Stamp & 

Stencil 
Works, 
Hamilton, Ont, 








The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 23c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MANFG. CO., 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 



This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co. 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 



■Hi' r 







A 
I POPULAR 



U Pal applied fa 




J. I. MAST MFG. CO., Litfe, Pa. 

Edwin H. Grenfell & Co., London, Ont., 

CANADIAN AOENTS. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by anyone. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



Patented, July 11th, 1893 




EXTENDED. 

Manufactured by THE ADA/VIS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U. S. A. 
" TAYLOR-FORBES CO. Limited, Guelph, Ontario. 



Imperial Standard Scales* 



For fine workmanship, 
accurate adjustment, 
strength and durability, 
there are no Scales 
quite equal to the 

IMPERIAL 
STANDARD SCALES 



Portable Platform Scales 
Iron Testing Machines 
Butchers' Scales 
Grocers' Scales 



Scale* of all capacities for all |mr [)oses, 
for use in any business. 



Railway Depot Scales 
Railway Track Seal 
Wagon and Stock S 
Hopper Scales for G 
Dormant Warehouse 
Flour Mill Scales 
Dairy Scales 
Druggists 5 Scales 
Miners' Scales 



Everything from a Letter Scale, weighing % ounce, 
to a great Railway Track Scale, weighing 100 tons. 

*«=- Our Name on any Scale is a guarantee of HigK Quality. 

Made at HAMILTON, ONT., by 

THE BORROW, STEWART k MILI CO,, Limitefl 

Have you seen our new illustrated catalogue (loo pages)? If not, write for It, 

86 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER 
THAN OUR OWN. 



THE PITTSBURG IRON AND STEEL 
MARKET. 

THERE i- a slight but well marked 
improvement in sentiment in the 
iron tr... impared with List 

week. There li.i> been no weakening in 
prices of finished material, and business is 
slightlj heavier. All stocks have been re- 
duced to the lowest ebb and the greater 
buying is due to tliis feet. The indica- 
tions .ill are (or .1 good Fall trade, as there 
is nothing to draw from except material 
vet to be made. Kail business now enter- 
ed tor 1IM14 delivery exceeds 500,000 tons, 
apart from Western orders closed the past 
week and not noting the tonnage which 
will have to \f carried over, which may 
reach 400,000 ions, and new orders are 
being booked right along. 

There is a fair chance that the wage 
scales of local molders and machinists for 
the year beginning July 1 will be adjusted 
without further difficulty. A meeting- is 
now in session of the conference com- 
mittees on the machinists' scale, and the 
molders arc to hold a mass meeting Wed- 
nesj.iv night to consider the proposition 
made them. 

The position in Bessemer pig is note- 
worthy. Consumers, even the very large 
ones, are buying only from month to 
month, but are taking out of the market 
fully as much iron on such monthly orders 
as they formerly did on long time con- 
tracts. Some odd lots from furnaces not 
usually selling in this district have been 
absorbed, at cut prices, and the valley 
furnaces hold to prices formerly quoted. 
The foundry iron trade has been marked 
by the entrv of a number of consumers, 
who have bought for early delivery to 
meet absolute requirements, there being 
no contracting ahead. In face of pros- 
pective better buying prices have con- 
tinued to recede. 

The steel market is comparatively quiet, 
there being only a fair amount of inquiry. 
The leading interest is a moderate seller 
of billets and sheet bars, at Hat prices, but 
only to recognized customers, at prices 
slightly lower than named by outside 
interests. The lowest price which has 
appeared is .<2s a ( m ;n f or Bessemer 
billets 

Business is slightly better in plates and 
shapes, while there is more inquiry for 

steel bars. In iron bars the situation is 



still very unsettled, with the leading inter 
est disposed to let outsiders take what 
little business is going at the large re- 
ductions they have recently made, and 
see if the market will not work round to a 
point nearer the old official basis. In 
merchant pipe the trade continues highly 
satisfactory, with several orders for large 
pipe for gas lines unplaced because the 
desired deliveries are very hard to secure. 
In tin plates the position is equally strong 
and the busy season bids fair to last much 
longer than usual. — Iron Trade Review, 
July 2. 

BRITISH PIG-IRON MARKET. 

On the Glasgow market this week there 
has been a slightly firmer tone attributed 
to the reduction in the bank-rate. Specu- 
lative business, however, is a dead letter 
at present, but apart from this there is 
rather more actual business being done. 
Ci. M. B. Scotch warrants were nominally 
52s. early in the week, and after improv- 
ing to 52s. 4^d. cash, they are easier 
again at 52s. 3d. The Middlesbrough 
market has been firm this week, and a 
fair business has been done. The heavy 
shipments have drawn upon stocks, and 
makers of foundry iron are in a good posi- 
tion. No. 3 Cleveland is quoted at 40s. 
fid. to 40s. !)d. East Coast hematite 
mixed numbers remain at 57s., with a 
moderate demand. No. 3 Cleveland war- 
rants were dealt in on Tuesday at 46s. 
lOd. cash, 47s. a month. The market 
was easier yesterday at 4Gs. 5>£d. cash, 
40s. 7d. a month, and closed to-day at 
46s. 3d. Makers' brands of West Coast 
hematite pig-iron are quoted 5<ts. 6d. by 
merchants, and although warrants are 
nominally 57s. 10d., there is no business 
in these, and the quotation is purely 
nominal. At Birmingham yesterday the 
market for pig-iron was again inactive. 
Best all-mine iron was quoted 54s. 6d.; 
part-mine, 50s.; and common Stafford- 
shire pigs, 50s. For Northamptonshire 
forge iron, 48s. (id. to 51s. was quoted : 
and for Derbyshire forge iron, 53s. On 
the Manchester market a good deal of 
iron has been sold as (he result of re- 
cent concessions, and makers now talk 
of restoring the old rates. Derbyshire 
forge iron is Ills, (id., and Lincolnshire 
and Lancashire brands 50s. to 50s. 6d. — 
Iron and Steel Trade Journal, June 27. 



BRITISH COPPER MARKET. 

Although there has been only a small 
daily business done in copper, yet the tone 
appears to have undergone some improve- 
ment within the past few days, and in 
some quarters, where a pessimistic dis- 
position had manifested itself, the view is 
now being taken that prices are getting 
down to about as low a figure as can be 
expected. A rather more confident feeling 
appears to have taken possession of the 
market, and should there be any consider- 
able accession of buying orders on the 
part of consumers, it is quite possible that 
the recent depression and inactivity might 
give place to comparative buoyancy. 
Meantime, in the United States there- 
appears to have been no alteration in the 
position, and it is believed that copper is 
being " carried " here on American ac- 
count. The Amalgamated Company are 
understood to have sold only very small 
quantities of metal to Europe at the 
recent reduction, but they are asserted to 
have disposed of a fair quantity to domes- 
tic consumers.-— Ironmonger, June 27. 

ST LOUIS LEAD MARKET. 

St. Louis, July 3. — There have been no 
fresh developments in the lead market dur- 
ing the past week, the situation being 
practically without change of importance. 
The tone of the market has been firm, 
sellers refusing to make concessions as a 
result of which the transactions through- 
out the week were small, and on a basis 
of $4.02 'A for Soft Missouri, at which the 
market closed sellers, with that bid for 
Chemical Hard, both prompt shipment, 
which, however, were hard to make. 
The receipts for the week were small, at 
10,870 pigs, compared with 84,770 pigs a 
week ago. Shipments, 24,(!40 pigs, 
against 10,510. — American Metal Market. 

THE AUSTRALASIAN IRON 
INDUSTRY. 

The Australian Commonwealth Minister 
of Customs (Mr. Kingston) recently stated 
that the intention of the Government was 
that they should endeavour to secure the 
establishment of the industry of manufac- 
turing iron from the ores in Australia by 
the payment of a bonus in relation to the 
manufacture of the article. Their pro- 
posals were taken from the Canadian 
precedent, which had been attended with 
considerable success!?). It was sug- 
gested to pay on the manufactured article 
from Australian ore various bonuses not 
altogether exceeding ^.251 1,000, being at 
the rate of about 20 per cent, on the value 
of the manufactured article. The works 
would cost about half-a-million, and 
£"1,250,000 worth of iron would have to 
be produced before the ^250,000 in 
bonuses could be earned. The total pro- 
duced thus in works and manufactured 
iron would be £1, 750,000, and all that 
they would get for ^250, 000, which would 
be spent amongst the people of Australia. 
—Iron and Steel Trades Journal, June 27. 



Portland Cements 

BEST 

German, Belgian and English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, 

Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, 
Drain Pipes, 
Hard Wall Plaster. 
Calcined Plaster, 
Wheelbarrows, 
Mortar Stains. 



A FULL STOCK OF 



BUILDERS' and CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 

W. McNALLY & CO. 

40 to 52 McGill Street, 

Corner Wellington St. , 

MONTREAL. 

Write for our quotations. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 

Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, etc. 




ALEX. BREMNER 



50. 
Bleury 
) Street, 




OUR FIREARMS WERE INTKOIM'CKI) IX 1864 AND 
SINCE THAT DATE HAVE BEEN RECOGNIZED AS 

Standard for Accuracy- 

YOUR JOBBER CAN SUPPLY OUR LINE. SEND FOR OUR LATEST CATALOGUES. 

J. STEVENS ARMS & TOOL CO.. Chicopee Falls. Mass., U.S.A. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12,16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



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*£ Australasian «£ 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
end Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 

post free to any part of the world. 

PUBLISHING OFFICES: 

Melbourne 



Fink's Buildings. 

Post Office Chambers. 



Sydney, « • 
BRITISH OFFICES : 

London, • . 42 Cannon St.E.C. 

CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



»«SV*SV" 



j Ask 
| and 
1 Recieve. 

Advertise 

and 
Acquire. 



If you want to .sell 
a business or a de- 
livery wagon, if you 
want a partner or a 
clerk — advertise. 
If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't whatyoudo 
want— advertise. 
Our condensed 
advertisements 
cost little, but are 
worth a good deal. 



You can reach most of the hardware 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a few cents. Our i-ate is 2c. per word 
each insertion, and remittance must 
accompany order in every case. 

hardware: and metal 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 



IWtftyW] 



Hardware »nd 

Mel.l 



DEPARTMENT OF ADVERTISING 
SUGGESTION AND CRITICISM 



Subscribers are Invited to send Mr Lydlatl specimens 
ng, f>>r the purpoM ol review In this department Address oare .>i Department >>t .vhertis- 



Edited by 

W. Arthur 
Lydiatt, 

TORONTO. 



The newspaper Is a platform from which the merchant addresses the public. The 4 ' impression" he makes 
is gauged by the weight of his cash drawer and the number of used pages in his order 

book at the end of the day. 



1 1 ; 1 1 1 \ ,.'u ii> hard to do something 
\\ well and tool confident that yon 
have succeeded, it is a little dis- 
appointing to have someone pick out 
the faults in your work and exhibit them 
'm .i critical, "fault-finding " way. 

You are (inclined to feel rather harshly 
toward the person who "dared" to pull 
your work to pieces ami belittle its value. 

You .no liable to criticise his criticism, 
in .m endeavor to justify your own opinion 
o\ work woll done. 

Vet, after all, it is only b) lookirfg for 
faults that wo aro enabled to decide on the 
degree of perfection which has been at- 
tained. The fewer tho faults the more 
perfect tho work. 

When you pick up tho paper containing 
your advertisement, you naturally turn at 
once to tho page ow which it is published 
and road h over. There is a pleasurable 
self-satisfaction in seeing your work in 
print- there before tho gaze of the'dnm- 
Jrods oi readers and you immediately 



JOHNSTONE &l CO. 

June is the month <•! iveddinga w 
equipped in all kiiic^ of wedding presents Cull in 
and inspeot our stock. Including all kinds oi 

Hoi KIM. CHAIRS HANGING LAMPS 

DIMM, i HAIRS I'Alil.oi; I. AMI'S 

ABM CH URH MAI. I. LAMPS 

fK I i ( Wi\ [NG SETS 

( BNTRE TABLES KNIVES and FORKS 

I. w.l.- w Ml. POCKETS 

Our Bargain Day Every Day ! 

Building Hardware, i A Few Prices. 

,\.- ooa a full < harcoal Irons 

..f everything Hammocks 1.26 

required !■" building Can - 90 

Butcher Knives .30 

.. ii , v . Door Locks . 15 

fain. Brushes In 

Ad import <•! . Furniture Varnish, 

a., .10 

Johnstone & Co., Mill s ., Acton 



mentally decide on tin.- merits ol tho ad., 
imagining, as it were, tho unheard com- 
ments oi its reader-. 

ljuito naturally you look for the good 
points. 

You think thai headline looks all right 
— and reads about right. 

You think those pri(\- are pretty well 
arranged and enticing enough to draw . 
some trado. 

Vou decide that tho argument is woll 
put, that it is convincing. 

And while you look at tho ad. from this 

prejudicial standpoint, you aro apt lo 

decide that vou would haw boon just as 

essful as a newspaper editor, or adver- 



tising export, as you are at the grocery 
business. 

Then, perhaps, you send that ad. to mo 
in the hope that I will have some nice 
thing to saj about it. 

Vou would like lo be told that it is the 
best ad. I have ever soon and have it re- 
produced in this department as a model 
ad. Vou would be inclined lo think 1 was 
an all-right fellow if 1 passed you a low 
compliments on it. 

And when you road in these columns a 
couple of weeks afterwards that your ad. 
" might be better," you either decide that 
I'm a crank — that I don't know a good ad. 
when I see it — or, after a little thought, 
that your ad. would stand some improve- 
ment. 

When an ad. is sent me for criticism I 
don't look for the good points. 

I want to help you, in so far as I can, 
to do better advertising and get the con- 
sequent bettor results. 

So 1 look for the faults. 

The first question that occurs to me is 
" How can this ad. be better ? " To an- 
swer it I must find some faults — and I 
generally do. 

Most ads. have some good points — some 
lack but a few details to make them about 
as good as could be. 

Hut if 1 took the time and space to call 
attention to an ad.'s good qualities, over- 
looking its discrepancies, you might feel 
satisfied that you were doing all right, and 
cease your endeavor to improve. 

it has been said that it is tho easiest 
kind of work to pick faults In the work of 
another. But when a remedy has to be 
suggested in each case, it becomes an al- 
together different proposition. 

Because I use the space in these columns 
to call attention to the faults in the adver- 
tisements submitted for comment, it need 
not be supposed that the ad. under discis- 
sion has no good points. Those you can 
usually discover for yourself. My mention 
of them will not help to make the ad. any 
better. 

It is my idea to use the ads. sent mo for 
criticism as illustrations of ADVERTISING 
\s it is done, and in my comment endea- 
vor to show now IT COULD BE DONE Bl ITER. 

And when you send me an ad. with a 
request lor my opinion, expect to gel 
whatever is due. If the ad. could bo im- 
proved I'll try and show you how —if it 
has some good points that are either un- 
usual or that illustrate some principle of 
advertising, it's quite likeh I'll call atten- 
tion to them. 

He -me and read over the criticisms 

28 



i. nli week. You're likely to find many 
suggestions that fit your case exactly. 
They aim to make bad advertising better 
— indifferent advertising different — assist 
good advertising by suggesting improve- 
ments — and as a whole to stimulate all 
who read this page to make the most of 
their opportunities for getting more 
business. 

From Johnstone & Co., Acton, Out., I 
have received the ad. which is reproduced 
herewith. I will confine my comment to 
an illustration of how much more effective 
an ad. could have been written on the 
same subject if the suggested style were 
employed. 

I don't think it best to advertise wed- 
ding presents and building hardware in 
the same ad. It is much better to restrict 
your talk to one line of goods, in a case 
like this at any rate. 

Wouldn't an ad. like the following be 
more likely to draw trade than the one 
Johnstone & Co. have sent me? 



JUNE FOR WEDDINGS. 

JOHNSTONE'S for Wedding Presents. 



We have plenty of " just-the -things" for 
wedding presents. If you'll drop into the 
store any convenient time mention that 
you want to select something for a wedding 
present - we'll help you decide im something 
suitable. 

There are Chairs. Pictures, Hanging 
and Parlor Lamps, Carving Sets, Knives 
and Forks, et<-., etc., and many oilier things 
which would make very acceptable presents. 

Pricesare not as high as you'd pay in 
the city. 

Have a look, anyway. 



Johnstone & Co., Mill St , Acton. 



1 know of one merchant in a small 
town, who, when he heard of a coming 
wedding, would write to all the friends of 
tho interested parties and ask them to call 
and look over his stock of suitable things 
for wedding gifts. Of course no mention 
was made of tho event, but I'm inclined to 
think that the hint was a little loo broad 
to make effective advertising. 

It's a good idea to get out a neat four 
or eight-page circular, illustrating a few 
desirable articles with good cuts, such 
things, for instance, as can ing sets, parlor 
lamps, etc., and send it to tho best families 
in town about the first of June. The better 
the piece of printing, the more effective 
will be the advertising. 




A 



y" 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Rochester Lamp Company, 12™*° 

Exclusive jobbers in all kinds of Oil and Gas Lamps, Gas 
Mantles, liunicrs, Chimneys, Globes, etc. 

We make a Specialty of Store, Hall, and Factory Light 
ing, xx- i r 1 1 cither ( >il or ( fas Lamps. 

We are Canadian Agents for the celebrated Votto Arc (ias 
Lamp, the most brillianl lighl and most economical gas lamp on 
the market today. 

WRITE FOR PRICES AND TERMS. 

THE ROCHESTER LAMP COMPANY, 24 "XS™ WEST 

UNION IRON and WOOD PLANES. 






No. 110. No. 9%. 

UNEQUALLED IN QUALITY AND FINISH. 



Union Mfg. Co., 



New Britain, Conn. 



FOR SALE BY ALL PRINCIPAL HARDWARE DEALERS 



Pure Manila Rope, 

Highest Quality made, 

British Manila, 
Sisal Rope, 

Pure Sisal, 



Binder Twine 



Lathyarn. 



-New twine in flat parks of 
every description. 



Lowest prices and highest quality. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 

Long Distance 'Phone 162 LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 

The latest and finest machinery is operated in this factory 

and although not the largest, it is the finest 

Mill of its size in the world. 



R.C.JAHIESON&CO. 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers of all kinds of 



Varnishes 
^ Paints 



i I • E8SOHJ8 TO THE OLD ESTAB1 [SHI D 
ii SINESSES'OF 



R. C. Jamieson & Co.ANoThe Baylis Mfg. Co. 



Office : 26 Nazareth Street. 

23 to 29 St. Thomas Street. 



Factories : 



\ 16 to 28 Nazareth Street, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




, K. SHEE1 IRON 
'. 1 is 
I. A I ES 
BARB WIRE. 
HAY BALING WIRE. 
BAR IRON AM) STEEL 



i AND WIRE NAILS. 

HARVES I TOOLS, 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 



05 

E 



0) 

Q 



Wareroom and General Offices 

10 De Bresoles St. 



Agents for 

WADSWORTH, HOWLAND Co. 
% JEWEL PAINTS. 

The ak. \i>i i ii i. Works. 




b Peters Cartridge Co- 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

i :oi "niai. Cordage Co., 

COD LINES. 



Lefever Arms Co. 

ACME Arms Co. 

Rogers Stain Floor Finish. 

Akmi & Na\ \ Liquid Glue 
Wachteb Manufacturing Co, 



CUTLERY AND SILVERWARE. 
CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



WAREHOUSE : 

45 Common St. 

UNIT LOCK " is the best on the market to-dav. 



THE CANADA HARDWARE CO., Limited SSftHSift, ■• MONTREA 






Hot-Weather Goods. 




Model Refrigerator. 

Moderate priced and excellent value. 

Built of best quality of kiln-dried lumber, panelled all 
round and finished in golden oak. 



We have a large stock of all kinds of 

Leonard Cleanable Refrigerators. 

Wick and Wickless Oil Stoves. 

WHITE MOUNTAIN 

ICE CREAM FREEZERS. 

The McClary Manufacturing Co., 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John. N B. 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE TINSHOP." 

30 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN, 

Montreal. 

rhe MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of Rrilish Columbia, 
Norlh-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, IMC. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES, 



Montreal 



Toronto 



232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

London, Eng. - - 109 Fleet Street, E.C. 

Manchester, Eng. - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H S. Ashburner. 

London, Ont. ... Hiscox Building. 

Walter H. Lindsay. 

ST. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Winniteg, Man. - 377 Cumberland Ave. 

D. J. Benham. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address J ^script, London. 



TO THE DEPARTED HOME-COMER 

THE Home-Comers have come and 
gone. For tour days Toronto kept 
open house for her prodigal sons ; 
for four days were old friendships renewed, 
old scenes revisited and old memories 
recalled. Now the Bags are taken down, 
the bunting removed, the busy city doffs 
her holiday attire and resumes the 
wonted routine, lor the festival is over. 

The " Old Home " weeks and " Old 
Boys' " reunions have become a noteworthy 
feature of these latter days, and it is most 
gratifying to find the enthusiasm for the 
home land which still burns in the breast 
of our sons who have become foster chil- 
dren of the gTeal republic to the south. 
The republic's quota to the crowd of last 
week was a large one, and showed little 
trace of inhospitable treatment in the 
land i>f their sojourn. They had every 
appearance of prosperity and contentment. 
Many of them have attained prominence; 
all have taken their part in making 
the name Canadian a recommendation 
and certificate of character. 

Our sons have done well. We expected 
none the less of them, and have not been 
disappointed. 



EDITORIAL 

Km on , oming fa* e to fai c with the 
prosperity which has blessed Canada 
these last eight 01 len years, it is not 
improbable thai even the most bu< i i 

ol 0111 sons may have been Struck With the 
thought, " I might have done as well, or 
better, had I Stuck to the old land." 

Indeed ihe same energy and vim which 
is necessarily exerted in severing old ties 
and starting over again under new con- 
ditions, if exerted al home in Canada, 
would, without doubt, have produced even 

greater results. 

I'he material growth in Canada during 
the past ten years has been remarkable, 
and out of all proportion with the increase 
in the population. In IH92, our total 
exports of home produce amounted to 
899,000,000. In 1902 they were $!!)<;,- 
000,000. for the same years our total 
imports, exclusive of coin and bullion, 
were $125,000,000 and $205,000,000 re- 
spectively. Our national revenue has 
increased from $36,000,000 to $58,000,000, 
while the burden of taxation has been un- 
noticeable. The bank discounts, during 
this decade, have increased from $2U>,- 
iiiiii,(iiMi to $426,000,000 per annum, while 
savings banks balances have grown from 
$51,000,000 to $78,000,000. Ten years 
ago our iron and steel industries were 
practically non-extant. There were, in- 
deed, one or two smelters at that time, 
but their output was small, and little faith 
was placed in their future. Last year our 
furnaces produced 327, 000 gross tons, and 
there are now in operation, or in course 
of construction, 16 iron furnaces with an 
annual capacity of 1,100,000 gross tons. 
Despite the sneers of Andrew Carnegie, 
Canadians are anticipating the day when 
we shall be one of the great factors in the 
world's iron and steel markets. 

As our population has by no means kept 
pace with the increase in material wealth, 
the average individual wealth has inevit- 
ably grown very greatly. Indeed per 
head of population our export trade is 
double that of the United Slates. 

The tide of immigration has been slow- 
in coming our way, but it has come at last 
with a rush. The world has awakened 
to the magnificent possibilities of the land 
of the maple, and is losing no time in 
31 



Hardware anil 



getting here. Last yeai oui immigi 
returns showed an unprecedented influx, 

and this year settlers are pouring in, ill 
ever increasing numbers. Manyofthes( 
•Hi from the home laud, and main mpn 
from across the border, some of whom an 

prodigals returning alter many days. 

We are all enthusiastic Canadians nowa- 
days, and it is doubtful if a single Old L 

has been allow eil lo HI in 11 lot h< h • Sain' . 
domain without being made to realize t hai 
this is our growing time, that we are on 
the crest of the wave and we won't be 
stopped. 

But there is more in life than (he amass- 
ing of wealth. What arc a few thousands 
more or less, if a man has to live in Pitts- 
burg, a plate not inaptly described as 
" hell with the lid off." These brilliant 
July days, the golden Autumn, the clear 
sparkling Winter, the reviving Spring, 
with which nature has blessed this favored 
land are enough alone to teach a man to 
swear by her. Nor can the home lift- 
across the border be confpared with that 
which obtains here. American cities may 
be distinguished for taller buildings, wider 
avenues, or gaudier residences, but 
Canadian cities are not less distinguished 
as cities of homes. 

Home-corner, Canadian cities welcome 
your advent : if vou must return, they 
wish you Godspeed. Hut remember, if 
ever wealth palls and the strenuous life 
grows wearisome, up north, under the 
maple, lies the Old Home, and the latch- 
string hangs outside. 



FRAUDULENT DEBTORS. 

THE Hon. Mr. Beique's bill to amend 
the Criminal Code 1802, respecting 
the punishment ol fraudulent debtors, has 
received its Second reading in the Senate. 
The bill deals with the keeping of books 
by tradespeople, purchasing goods on 
credit, and is copied from the Scotch 
Debtors' Act of 1**0. The bill provides 
that any debtor to the extent of 81,000, 
who for five years previously had not kept 
books or could not account for his losses 
to the satisfaction of the court, should be 
liable for imprisonment. 

The necessity for the bill is urged on 
account of the number of merchants who 



Hardware and 
Motel 



EDITORIAL 



ipted into stock gambling, 

with funds which rightly belong to their 

creditors, and it is claimed that similar 

ttion, in France and other countries, 

has had i salutary effect. 

From a casual examination, the bill 
strik*. being perhaps too drastic, 

although its object cannot be too highly 
commended. In this day and age o( the 

world, business is done on so narrow a 
11 that the man who fails to keep a 
keen eye on his business, exact accounts 
and a clean stock list, is bound, sooner or 
later, to find himself unable to meet his 
obligations, and o( couase his creditors 
sutler. Sueh carelessness, as is contemp- 
lated in the Hon. Mr. Beique's bill, if 
resulting merely in disaster to the de- 
linquent, would he regrettable : when the 
interests of others are imperilled, it is 
culpable, and when aggravated by outside 
speculation is deserving of severe punish- 
ment. Ordinary commercial morality 
should teach men in business to keep 
their books in good shape, and avoid 
flyers-in-stocks. It is the ignoring of 
just such rules as these that makes neces- 
sarv, at times, the passing of bills like the 
one under discussion. 



BUSINESS MEN ANDTHE MANITOBA 
ELECTIONS 

MANITOBA is in the midst of a pro- 
vincial general election. Accord- 
ing to the Government papers the Govern- 
ment is very strong and its record so satis- 
factory that it will have no difficulty in 
being returned to power. The tone of the 
Opposition papers, however, would lead 
one to the opposite conclusion. But busi- 
ness men mav be assured that politicians 
are much about the same, to whichever 
partv they belong. Business men, there- 
fore, need not be very much concerned in 
regard to the victory of this or that party. 
What should concern the business men 
in Manitoba as well as in every other 
province of the Dominion is the election of 
good men — men of sound business com- 
mon sense. If they are actuated at all 
times by a party spirit and not by sound 
business judgment, they cannot but ex- 
pect the men that represent them in Par- 
liament will be of the same class. Like 



begets like, in politics as well as in every- 
thing else. 

It is to be hoped that the business men 
in Manitoba will support for parliamentary 
honors men of experience in mercantile 
affairs, irrespective of what their party 
affiliations may be. 

In all the provinces there is a demand 
for a larger representation of the business 
element in the Legislatures and it is: to be 
hoped that the progressive province of 
Manitoba will set a good example by re- 
turning to the next House men of com- 
mercial experience and of sound integrity. 



THE HALF-YEAR'S FAILURES. 

THE summary of business failures in 
the United States and Canada for 
the six months ending June 30, which 
appeared in last Saturday's Bradstreet's, 
is particularly gratifying to Canadians, 
and is indicative of the general prosperity 
which Canada is now enjoying. During 
the past six months there have been 480 
failures in Canada, as compared with 603 
for the corresponding months of 1902. 
At the same time, the liabilities involved 
have fallen from $5,103,404 to $4,446,743, 
and the excess of liabilities over assets 
from $2,855,194 to $2,331,442. In the 
United States, although the number of 
failures during the last six months was 
4,790, as compared with 5,262 for the first 
six months of 1902, the liabilities involved 
have risen from $56,927,688 to $60,251,- 
563. 

Canada can be congratulated upon the 
fact that, in spite of the unsatisfactory 
condition of the stock market, the mercan- 
tile world makes such a good showing. 



ENLIVENING SUMMER BUSINESS. 

r r N HK midsummer quietness is about due 
1 to settle down over the hardware 
trade, as well as others, in most sections 
of the country, in the older parts especially, 
and it is a good time to " sit and scheme 
for business," as one lucky retailer, who 
doesn't seem to mind the heat, puts it. 
The result of a " scheming " on his part 
was the opening of a bargain counter in 
his store. It proved an excellent idea. 

A bargain counter keeps things moving. 
Not only can old stock be removed by 
32 



means of it, but new goods and novelties 
can be displayed to advantage at a counter 
where naturally customers look for the 
lowest price in everything. But its chief 
advantage would be as a means of getting 
rid of dead stock. It is the maxim of 
some merchants that old stock to the 
dealer means new goods to the customer, 
which is doubtless true ; but it will lie 
on the shelves for all that till disposed of 
at a cut price, and in some cases but a 
fraction of a reduction is needed when the 
goods are sold over the bargain counter. 
It is not wanted by the customers whether 
new to them or not, and it is better to 
have 75 per cent, of the regular selling 
price of the goods than to have the goods 
themselves season after season keeping 
the dust off the top shelves. 

The bargain counter will sell them if 
anything will, when it is backed up by a 
little advertising. All lines to be " closed 
out at cost " can be put in the bargain 
counter section, and the very presence of 
a bargain counter is enough to make some 
customers buy. The goods there can be 
changed every few days, and the general 
appearance of the section or counter 
altered somewhat as to the disposition of 
the articles and various lines, so that it 
does not have the appearance of a corner 
where mere trash is stored under the 
name of a bargain. Dead stock is not 
trash to anyone except the merchant who 
owns it. 

Little articles, say of tinware, or wooden- 
ware, novelties, some staples, low-priced 
side lines and such goods will find a suit- 
able place on counters or centre stands 
devoted to 5, 10 and 15c. lines. They 
add variety to a store, and the goods, 
when labelled and ticketed, are always 
inspected by visitors, generally with the 
result of some small purchases being 
made. But a lot of small purchases total 
up to a fairly respectable volume ot profit- 
able sales. 



A LAMENTABLE ACTION. 

THE Canadian trade commissioner in 
South Africa writes to the Depart- 
ment at Ottawa under date of May 30, 
protesting against the action of certain 
Canadian shippers of building material 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware »nd 



for railways, who sent out to South Africa, 
as first-class, materia! which, on arrival, 
was found to be very inferior, The orders 
amounted to several thousand pounds, and 
after considerable delay about £8,000 
worth arrived. The material was so in- 
ferior that no buyers i ould be found who 
would use it for the commonest kind of 
work, and the timber is left on the hands 
of the broker who handled it, he having 
accepted a sight draft for it before it was 
refused. 

If this sort of thing becomes common, 
all our efforts for developing trade with 
South Africa will come to nothing. It 
required but a short acquaintance with 
the South African market to learn that 
they want the best of goods, not the 
cheapest, and if we can supply the best 
it is our duty to do so, to say nothing of 
its being entirely to our interest to intro- 
duce the finest goods of any description 
into a country which we desire to convert 
into a good customer for Canada. But 
whatever degree of quality our exported 
manufactures and natural products pos- 
sess, misrepresentation, as in the above 
case, is the worst evil we could fall into, 
and will more quickly destroy our export 
trade than anything else. Let us hope 
that the shippers of the railway material 
can give some explanation. 



There is wo belter wav to cement a bond 

ol confidence than by frequently meeting 
each other to talk over trade affairs, and 

to meet in a social way. If this is true o[' 
the master plumbers it is just as trui >>i 
the manufacturers and supply men. If 
the master plumber sees that the manu- 
facturers can '< tiust each other, bow can 
he be expected to put that confidence in 

the manufacturers and supply nun which 
he should ? It is of interest to note that 

representatives of the manufacturers and 

and supply men met in Montreal and 
decided to form an association. This 
should be the beginning of a Dominion 
association. A very interesting meeting 
of the members of the Central Supply- 
Association of the United States took 
place June 23 and 21 at Put-in-Bay Island, 
Lake Erie. It was there felt that, while 
primarily such meetings were for the dis- 
cussion of trade matters, yet the social 
side of such gatherings was no small 
factor in bringing about a better state of 
affairs. In no other way can an intimate 
acquaintance be formed so quickly or that 



HEATING AND TINWARE NUMBER. 
The Issue of Hardware and ru-tal, July 
25, will be a Special Heating; and Tinware 
Number. 



ADVANTAGE OF ORGANIZATION. 

THE advantages of an organization of 
the manufacturers and supply men 
engaged in the same line of trade are 
many. At the recent meeting of the 
National Association of Master Plumbers 
held in Montreal one of the principal ad- 
vantages referred to was the benefit to he 
derived from such an association in creat- 
ing a feeling of mutual confidence. It 
was felt this confidence was strengthened 
from time to time by bringing the crafts- 
men together. Trouble is often caused 
by some petty jealousy, by some hearsay 
remark, which is believed because the 
competitor is not personally known. 
There is little use in making agreements 
between parties unless they have every 
confidence in each other, and unless each 
believes that the other will live up to the 
terms agreed upon. 



will be so lasting. These are days of 
keen competition, and it is only by estab- 
lishing a feeling of good fellowship one 
with the other that the resorting to what 
may be called sharp practice can to some 
extent at least be overcome. 



close of any yeai tin quantity of bounty- 
earning lead exceeds .■'„•',,:•,:',;: tons, th« rate 

o( bounty is to be reduced SO as to bring 
the payments within the maximum i>i 

|600,000. If the charges for transporta- 
tion and treatment of lead ores in Canada 
are excessive, or anj discrimination pre- 
vail, which prevents the smelting of lead 

ores in Canada on fair and reasonable 

terms, the Government takes power to pay 
the bounty at a reduced rate on the lead 
Contained in ores mined in Canada and 
transported for treatment abroad. The 
bounties are to cease on June 30, 1908. 

It will be remembered that ever since 
the opening of the present session the 
matter has been made one of paramount 
importance, not only by the lead miners 
but by the business men of British Colum- 
bia generally. Several interviews have 
appeared during recent months with men 
representing varied business interests in 
that province, all of whom agreed that 
the prosperity of a large part of the prov- 
ince would for the next few years be 
materially affected by the treatment gi%en 
the lead interests by the Dominion Govern- 
ment. 

A duty on lead imported into Canada 
was asked for, but to do this would have 
necessitated a rearrangement of duties on 
all lead products. The aid given will, 
therefore, probably be more satisfactory to 
the country generally, and should be 
adequate to satisfy the interests which 
sought the increased protection. 






AID FOR LEAD INDUSTRIES 

BUSINESS men of British Columbia 
and, in fact, throughout the Domin- 
ion will be pleased with the announcement 
made by Hon. W. S. Fielding, Dominion 
Finance Minister, on Monday, that a 
bounty of 75c. per 100 lb. or $15 per ton, 
would be paid on lead smelted in Canada 
from native ores. 

The conditions of the bounty are simple. 
The sum to be paid in any fiscal year is 
not to exceed $.">00,000, and when the 
standard price of pig lead in London 
exceeds .£. 1 2 10s. sterling per ton of 
2,240 lbs., the bounty is to be reduced 
proportionately by such excess. If at the 
33 



A SHORTENING OF TERMS. 

IN keeping with the tendency of the age 
the manufacturers of wire and cut 
nails, screws, spikes, horseshoes, rivets and 
burrs, bolts and nuts have shortened their 
terms of sale to 60 days, net ; 2 per cent. 
off at 30 days. Their former terms were 
four months net ; 3 per cent, off at 3d 
days. It is understood that manufacturers 
of other lines may follow this step. 



MANUFACTURER'S AGENT WANTED 

An Old Country firm exporting tin plates 
want to place a Canadian agency. Any 
manufacturer's agent who would like to 
get in touch may have his letter forwarded 
if he writes to the editor of HARDWARE 
and Metal. 



QUEBEC MARKETS. 

I, .lulv 10, IS 
HARDWARE. 

r I , I i'iiIU in the midsummer 

■ lull spell an -uli the vol 

i- light. 

, unfilled to a vex} 

ni in win fencing and otb 

.t and wire aails, a tew lota ol 

uails and a 

uttered over other 

d few or do chang 

to i epoi t . a lir r feeling 

in cotton rope, which i- A., dearer, and 
cotton bed cord, which is 10 per cent. 
,i ilu' only changes to 
mention. 

BARB WIRE. Quiet and steady. Our 

quotation* are as follows: $2.80 

lb. f.o.b. Montreal, ami $2.65 

Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons are 

quoted f.O.b. Cleveland at 12.45. 

G \l.\ WIXKI) WIRE. Trade is light. 
Our quotations are as follows: 

• $3.15 ; No. 
I : No. II, §3.25 ; 
No. 13, 52.7.i ; No. 14, 
53.75. In carlots, f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 
G, 7, 8 and 9, §2.15 ; No. 
10, $2.20; No. II. 5'2. '25 ; No. 12, 552.30; 
50. In less than 
carlots, 124c. per 100 lb. extira is charged. 
SMOOI II STEEL WIRE. Business is 
dull. Our quotations are as follows: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net extras 
per 100 lb. are now as follows j 
Uoppered v'-e, 00c; tinned wire, §2; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, §1.25 ; best 
wire, 75c; bright soft drawn, 15c; 
special hav-baling wire, 30c. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. Unchanged n< 
last quoted. Our quotations are as 
follows 25 per cent., with ex- 

tras : 1 and 2-lb. hanks, 25c. per 100 lb.; 
K -lb. hanks, 37£c. and J-tb. hanks, 50c. 
BRASS WIRE. Discount 60 per cent.. 
PRESSED SPIKES. Trading is light. 
Discounts remain 20 per cent, f.o.b. 
Montreal, Toronto, Bamilton, London, 
lohn and Halifax. 
FEN I I. - 1 \l'l.l> In moderate de 
maml. We quote $3 per 100-tb. keg for 
inized and 82.80 for bright, with 
■ 25 and 50 lb. packages. 
1 I I NAILS. I here has been a fair 
demand for these al 82.45 f.o.b. Mont 
real 
WICK NAILS In fair request. We 

quote 1 .u lots al $2. 10 and small 

al $2 l"i per keg f.o.b 1 lanan 
oque, Montreal, London, Bamilton, 
[Won to. Brant ford, Windsor, Out., and 
St. -lohn. 

HOUSE SAILS Strong but dull. 

We quote as folic. " M" brand, 

" Oval" and " New I ity" heads, 56 per 

•■ni , " Countersunk " heads, 55 per 

" C" brand, 40, 10 and 7| |ier 

off ; " Monarch," 50 and 7£ |ier 

cent , and " Peerless," 50 per cent. 

HORSJ =>HOI - B lull We 

quote : lion xhoes, lighl and med 
inm pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
No. 1 and smaller, 13.90; mow pat- 
tern, No. 2 and lai ■' , No l a,.. I 
smaller, §1.15; X L steel shoes, n--... 
pattern, sizes I to 5, No. 2 and 
large, 

featherweight, all size to toe 

weight, all size I to hoes, 



than one size in a Keg, lOo. per keg 
extra f.o.b. Montreal only. 
Kl\7 is WD Bl RRS, Without fea 

line. Discounts are as follows: 

Best iron ii\rts. section carriage 
and wagon box. black rivets, tin 
ned do., ooopers' rivets and tinned 
swedes rivets, 00 and 10 jier cent.; swedes 
iron burrs are quoted at 55 per cent, off ; 
copper rivets, with ■ the usual proportion 
of burrs, 45 per cent, off, and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-lb. carton 
boxes are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent, 
off list. 

BOLTS AND \l IS. -Remain steady 
with very little enquiry. Discounts are 
as follows: Norway carriage bolts, 

55 per rent. ; common, 50 ; full 

square carriage, 55 ; machine, 50 and 5 ; 
coach screws, 66 2-3 ; sleighshoe bolts, 
65 and 5 ; blank bolts, 50 and 5 ; bolt 
ends, 50 and 5 ; plough bolts, 50 and 5 ; 
tire bolts, 67£ per cent.; stove bolts, 
t>7£ per cent. Nuts, square, 3£c per lb. 
oil list ; hexagon nuts, 3Jc. per lb. oil" 
list. 

SCREWS.— Only a sorting trade doing. 
Discounts are : Round head bright, 
82) per cent.; Hat head bright, x 7 !_. pel 
cent.; brass, round head, 75 per cent. ; 
brass. Hat head. B0 per cent. 

CORDAGE. — There is a fair enquiry. 
Cotton rope and cotton bed cord are 
higher. We quote : Pure manilla, Hie; 
British pure manilla, 12c; sisal. I I Jo; 
double lathyarn, 1 1 Ac; single lathy am lie; 
cotton rope, 16£c; cotton twine, 17 and 
2iic for 3 and 1 ply. Cotton bed cord, 
90c to 91.35, according to length. 

BINDER TWINE.— Fairly active and 
steadv at In.', to 13c. 

BUILDING PAPER.— There is a fair 
demand. Our quotations are as Eol 

lows : Tarred felt. $1.85 per 100 H>. ; 
2-ply ready roofing, 90c. per roll ; 3 ply, 
$1.15 per roll; carpet felt, §2.25 per 100 
lb.; dry sheathing, 40c. per roll ; tar 
sheathing, 50c. per roll ; dry fibre, 55c. 
per roll ; tarred fibre, 65c. per roll ; K 
and I X L, 70c. per roll ; heavy straw 
and sheathing, §35 per ton ; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

SHOT.— Trade is lighter. We quote 
as follows: Ordinary drop shot, 

A.A.A. to dust, §6.50 per 100 lb.; 
chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, 57.00 per 100 
lb.; buck and seal, 87.50 per 100 lb.; 
ball, $8 per 100 lb. Trade discount, 15 
per cent. f.O.b. Montreal, Toronto, Ham 
ilton, London. St. -John. N.B., and Hali 
fax. 

FIREBRICKS.— In good demand. We 

>te as follows: $16 to $22 per 1,000 

for English and §17 to §22 for Scotch. 
as to brand. 

CEMENT. Rules unchanged We 

quote . Canadian cement, §1.90 to §2.25 ; 
German, §2.25 to §2.40; English, §2.15 
to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 per bbl. 
ex-store, and American, §2.20 to §2.40 
ex-cars. 

METALS 

The tone in heavy iron is distinctly bel 
ter as regards values, lint the amount of 
business passing is light, as buyers do 
not .seem too anxious to load up, or 
place orders to any extent for forward 

business either. In metals there has been 

more or less fluctuation in pig till out 

side and also in copper, while ~l t zinc 

and spelter have ruled stead} to a turn 

firmer, but the range of spot values on 
all four have been unaffected. 

PIG [RON. I'ii lie— continues very 



light. We quote : ('arron, \'o. 1, 

$2] ; do., No. 3, $19.75 ; Middlesboro', 
No. 3, $17.75; Ayersome, No. I, §20 v . 
do., No. 3, $19.40. 

B \ l; I RON, Rules quiet with prices 
unchanged. We quote : Merchants' bar, 
§2 ; horseshoe iron, §2.25 and forged iron, 
§2.30. 

BLACK SHEETS. In fair request. We 
quote: 2s gauge, $2.45; 26 gauge, 
§2.40; 22 to 24 gauge, §2.35; 18 to 20 
gauge, §2.30 and 8 to 10 gauge, §2.40. 

CAI.\ Wl/.KD [RON. There is a fair 
trade doing. We quote as follows : 
28, Queen's Head, §4.40 ; Apollo, lOj-oz., 
§4.30; Fleur-de-Lis, §4.15; Comet, $4; 
Bell brand, §4.05. In less than case lots, 
25c. extra. 

LEAD PIEE.— Quiet with prices steadv. 

We quote 8c for composition waste 
and 7c for ordinary, with .'ill per cent 
discount. 

[RON PIPE.— Continues as last report- 
ed. We quote : Standard pipe, per 
100 ft., in lengths under 19 ft.: Black, \, 
§2.40; I, §2.65; *, §2.85, f, §3.65 ; 1-in., 
§5.20; li, $7.35; H, §8.95; 2-in., $12.55. 
Galvanized, |, §3.2u ; §, §3.45; 4, $3.85; 
i, §5; 1-in., §7.20; 1 1. §10.05; 14, §12.- 
20 ; 2-in., 416.85. Extra heavy pipe, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 ft. as 
follows: Black, *, §4.20; £, $5.25; 1-in., 
§7.55; 11, 410.55; 1$, §12.75; 2-in., $17.- 
60 Galvanized, $, §5.20; ?, §6.65; 1-in., 
§9.55; li, $13.25 ; 14, §16; 2-in., §21.90. 

TIN PLATE. — There has been some for 
ward import business done at the equiva 
lent of lower prices. Prices on spot 
however, are unchanged, §4.00 for coke 
and $4.25 for charcoal. 

TERNE PLATE.— Unchanged at $7.25. 

COIL CHAIN. ^-Without feature. We 
quote : No. 6. Hi,-; No. 5, 9c; No. I. s.',c : 
No. 3, 7c; £-in., 64c; 5-16 in., $4.90; "j>- 
in., $4.20; 7-16-in., §4; ^-in., $3.90; 9-16- 
in., $3.75; |-in., §3.60; j£-in., §3.50; £-in., 
§3.45, and 1-in., §3.40, with 10c. allow- 
ance on carlots. 

CANADA PLATE.— There is some c, 
quirv for fall importations. We quote as 
follows : 2s, §2.60 to §2.70 ; 60s, §2.70 
to §2.80 ; 75s, §2.80 to §2.85 ; full pol- 
ished, §3.75 and galvanized, §4.25 to 
$4.35; galvanized, 60s, §4.45 to §4.55. 

STEEL. — Unchanged. We quote: 
Mild, §2.05 ; sleighshoe, §2.10 to $2.20 ; 
tire, §2.15 to §2.25 ; spring, §2.85 to $3 ; 
reeled machinery, §2.75 to §3 ; toecalk, 
$2.60 to $2.75 ; machinery (iron finish), 
§2.10; mild steel, §2.05; square harrow, 
§2.50. 

TOOL STEEL.-7-Quiet. We quote as fol- 
lows : Black Diamond, 8 to 9c; San- 
derson's, 8' to 9c, according to the grade; 
Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7^c; donas & 
Colver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 50 
to 65c per lb. 

INGOT COPPER.— Unchanged al $15.50 
to $15.75 

I NCi 1 1 TIN, Quiel a1 $33 to $33.25 per 
EO0 lb. 

PIG LEAD.- Dull and unchanged at 
$3.15 t.. $3.25. 

SOLDER. Quid at 20c for bai and 
19c for w ire. 

ZINC SPELTER. \s last reported at 

$5 75. 

SHEET ZINC Continues dull al $6 50 

to $6.75. 

SCRAP METALS. 

Trade is ligfoi and prices unaltered. We 

quote as follows: Heavy copper and 
wire, 10c per lb. ; light copper, 9c; 
heavy red brass, 10c; heavy yellow, 84c; 



light brass, oc; lead, 2 to 2Jc; zinc, 24 
to 2Jc; iron, No. I wrought, 116 to 
$16.50 ; No. 2, $7.50 per ton ; machinery 
scrap, 816 to 816.30; Btove plate, (13; 
malleable and steel. 86; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; old rubbers, 
''{ to 6Jc. per lb. 

ASHES 

\SIIKS. Firm and higher. We quote 

First pots, 86.20 to 85.26 . seconds, 85 ; 

Pearls, per (00 lb., 86.25 

HIDES 

HIDES. Tliis market continues « ) 1 1 i ■ • i 
but irregular, the opposition buyers still 
upsetting the standard. We quote: No. 
i beef hides, 8 to 9c; No. 2, 7 to 8c; 
No. •'!. 6 to 7c No. I buff sheepskins, 7"> 
to 77c. Lambskins, 25 to 30c. No. I 

calfskins. I lc; No. 'J. 9c. 

RAW FURS. 

Ii.clc continues very quiet this week, 
only a few furs, of those in season. being 
offered. A varietj of prices are quoted 
for good furs. We quote 



THE MARKETS 

allv anticipate that trade lor the latter halt 

of the year will continue to be of good 
volume with general conditions fairly latit 

factory. Much, however, depends on how 
the crops turn out , and the state of some of 
these is yet uncertain. 

* * * 

There have been lew changes in the quota- 
tions of any importance. I. disced oil, which 
has been in good demand, i>, still quoted at 
Hoc. for raw and 68c. for boiled. Turpentine 
has settled down to sic. and the situation 
is much easier. Oils in general are un- 
changed. Cotton duck, owing to the hijjh 
price of cotton, has advanced elsewhere, 
and if this advance hold a corresponding 
advance will be made here. At this season 
the demand is not heavy and the cotton 
situation may be easier before the Autumn 
demand sets in. Manufacturers have ad- 
vanced screws about ten per cent., but the 



Hardware and 

Mot.l 



l,;n .-• \r li in Small 

BEAVER -Labrador and choice Eastern 86.00 $5.00 |2.75 

Territory Hoeky Mountains and Western 



sniriiy Prime, 

Partly Prime, 

Unprlme, 

Flttt, weak, or poor, 



or, No. 1 
or, No. 2 
or, No. 3 
or, No. 4 



6.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 



4.00 
3.00 
2.00 
.50 



2.00 
2.00 
.75 
.25 



Large Medi'ui Small 



Kills 
$1-1.50 

50-. 75 
.50 
.40 
.25 
2 
6.00 



I'.EAK Hla.-k rlmirr.mly 15.00 10.00 7.50 

Brown " 12.00 7.00 5.00 

1 2 3 4 

BADGER -Of all sections..' 50 .25 .10 .05 

Dark Brown Tale 2 

FISHER Eastern and far North-Eastera 6.50 5.00 5.00 3.00 

Territory and Western 6.50 5.00 3.50 2.00 

Large Small 2 3 

POX— Red— North-Eastern and similar flue bright red kinds.... 4.00 2.75 1.25 .75 

Territory and Western 4.00 2.75 1.40 .50 

Dark Fair Pale 2 

" Cross— Value principally as to beauty, also si/e & richness 10.00 7.00 4.00 2 50 

Silver -Eastern and far Northern 75.00 50.00 25.00 20.00 

Pacific Coast. Territory and Western 50.00-60 35.00 20.00 15.00 

Large Medi'ni Small 2 

LYN X - Far North-Eastern 4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2 to 4.00 



■si 

3 

3.00 



■*■'-. \ 

fel 

Cubs. Yearl's 

$2.00 to $8.00 

1.00 to 5.00 



3 

1.75 
1.00 

4 

.20 

.20 

3 
1.50 
9.00 
5.00 

3 
1.00 

.60 

3 



Territory and Western 4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2.00 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

MARTEN— British Columbia, Northern Pacific and similar. ... 7.00 5.00 3.50 1.75 to 2.50 1.00 

Territory and Western 7.00 2.25 1.50 1.00 .60 

Quebec and Ontario 3.00-3.502.25-3.00 2 to 2.25 1.00 .50 

Large Medi'm Small 2Large2Small 



MINK— Halifax, far North-Eastern and choice 4.00 3.25 2.50 2.25" 

Territory and Western 1.50-2.00 1.50 1.00 .75 

Spring Winter Fall Kitts 

MUSKRAT— Eastern, best large 25-28e. .10to.l3 8 to 10 2 to 5 

Territory and Western 20c. 5to.l0 .07 2 to 4 

Large Small 2 3 

OTTER-Labrador and far North-Eastern $10 7.00-10 10.00-12 2.50-5 

Territory and Western 4.00 4.50 3.50 to 5 2.25 

Large Small 2 3 

RACOON— 75-1.25 .60-75 .33-50 .25 

" Black— Value according to darkness, size and beauty 2.25 2.00 1.00 .50 

Black ShrtStLong St White 

SKUNK 75-1.25 .75 .40-.50 .05-15 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

WOLVERINE— Value according to darkness, size and beauty.. 5.00 4.00 2.50 1.50 



1.50 



4 

.50 
.50 



4 

.50 
ISO 
2.50 

.25 

■20 

4 

.25 

.20 

.25 

3 

.40 

.25 



.25 
.15-25 



4 ' 
2 to 4.00 
.50 
4 

.15 
.25 



Cubs 
1.00 to $2.00 
.25 to .50 



4 
.25 



CASTOREUM-. 



.$5.00 to $6.00 per pound. 



NOVA SCOTIA MARKETS 

Halifax, July 7, 1903. 

THE hardware markets have not shown, 
nor are they expected to show at this 
season, very great activity. A fair 
amount of business is being done covering 
almost every line in the trade, but largely 
in paints, oils, building materials, plumbers' 
supplies, etc. Vacations are in order and a 
little relaxation until the rush of Autumn 
business comes on. 

* * * 

The general conditions of trade may be 
considered good and late collections have 
been a little better than was anticipated a 
month ago. The depressed feeling that pre- 
vailed has largely disappeared and high 
hopes are entertaiued for the future. Busi- 
ness so far this year has been fully up to the 
average in every line and particularly heavy 
in builders' materials, and the dealers gener- 



full effect of the advance has not been felt 
here and quotations remain practically the 
same for orders of anv material volume. 



Dealers still report that it is impossible 
to get orders filled by the manufacturers 
with any promptness, although the situa- 
tion in some lines is slightly better than 
earlier in the season. There is no expecta- 
tion that a better condition will rule for 
some months. Evidently, in expanding 
times, such as are now being experienced, 
there is room for a much larger output from 
the Canadian manufactories of various lines 
of hardware, so that competition might 
result in an easier price situation. Though 
there is an immense amount of building 
going on throughout the province, it is re- 
ported from all sections that many building 
operations have been deferred until next 

35 



TIN PLATES 



DOMINION CROWN -lies! I 

led. 

ALLAWAYS 1 t Charcoal. 
CANADA CROWN -Charcoal. 
LYDBROOK | ,, , , oke 
TRYM J 

All Stan. lard brands. Accept no substitute. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Morchants Bank Building. 
MONTREAL. 



Hardwaremen 

sh«ui.i H.ii McDougall Pumps 

i«cause they are unexcelled In workman 
ship, lasting realities and strength. 

They are practically indestructible and 
you can honestly recommend them to 
your customers. 

Every pump is guararj 

Send for catalog 

The R. 
McDougall 
Co., Limited 

GALT, ONT. 



Pig Tin 

BOUSTEAD & CO.'S PENANU. 

INGOT COPPER 

LAKE AND CASTING. 

PIQ LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 
PIG IRON 




ADAM HOPE & CO, 

Hamilton, Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u.^ 

HEW GLASGOW, i.S 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

Aad SEEKERS MIRTH 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



M«m-I 



I of the high pi 
\ number >»f ncta cases are 

11 in the city With a return to 
Dormal prices these operations would l>e 

: ■ tfii . 

• « * 

red from Ottawa last 
that the Finance Ministei had decided 

-h Columbia lead miius 

- to what effect 

this 1 1 1 . i \ have .hi the- price of lead anil lead 

ict. Tin • is ot opinion s-etns 

that priees. though tirm at present, 

ma; Ivanced. 

R. C. H. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA MARKETS. 
Vancouver, H C, July i. L903. 

VMOST remarkable action has been 
decided upon to-day by the B. C. 

Lumbermen's Association, in refusing 
i any more lumber or other building 
material locally. The action, which will 
■ot affect the export trade to the North- 
west, or the cargo trade of mills engaged in 
that branch, is said to be caused entirely by 
the strike or lock-out of all bench and lactory 
hands in the planing mills. This trouble 
•i on June 1, and the men call it a lock- 
out, while the employers say it is a strike. 
The facts are, that the men had formulated 
a demand for a new schedule of hours, ask- 
ing a nine-hour day, with five hours on 
Saturday, with no reduction o( then-goin^ 
wages. This, they said, would have to be 
acceded to by June 1, or they would strike. 
The employers, determined to refuse, posted 
notices in the mills that all men who would 
not continue work at the old rate of wages 
and for the same hours, were to leave their 
work on May ,'il and take their tools out 
of the shops. The men removed their tools 
and the strike, or lock-out, has been on ever 
since. 

* * * 

Efforts have been made, with no success, 
to keep the factories going with non-union 
men, as orders for city trade and for the 
Northwest were heavy. Xo end of trouble 
has lu.-en experienced in trying to fill orders, 
and building has been under difficulties right 
along. A very large amount of building is 
under construction in this city, and the men 
who were out, being carpenters and mem- 
bers of the carpenters' union, were easily 
able to get work. The other carpenters 
ted their brethren with strike pay from 
their funds. In both ways the mill men 
were unable to combat the men, and thus 
the decision was arrived at, to refuse all 
orders in Vancouver, 

* • • 

The effect of such a measure, if the action 
is kept up for anytime, will be far-reaching. 
The associated building trades, as brick- 
layers, plasterers and others, will be 
thrown out with the carpenters, and 
dealers in builders' hardware who have 
enjoved a very brisk trade will be very 
.eriously affected. Fortunately, the general 



THE MARKETS 

belief is that the position will not long be 
maintained. 

• • • 

Overproduction of logs is adding to the 
unsettled condition of the lumber industry 
on the coast. The mills can only cut about 
3,000,000 feet pei day, all counted. There 
are estimated to be 5,000 loggers engaged 
in the camps of the coast. If these, at a 
conservative estimate, produce at the rate 
of one thousand feet per day, the output of 
.Yould soon show an enormous sur- 
plus. On the Sound there is much the same 
condition existing. The export of logs from 
any but Crown-Granted lauds has prevented 
is competing in the United States 
market. So that both ways there has been 
curtailment of a possible outside market. 
There is much unrest as a consequence. 
The logging industry is one which has been 
a very profitable one to the hardware 
merchants who cater to the trade. The 
machine shops, too, have found a great deal 
of profitable business in the manufacture of 
donkey engines and other appliances for 
handling the heavy logs. 

• • » 

In the Kootenays the announcement from 
Ottawa that the Government has under 
consideration, with every likelihood of 
granting it, a $15 bonus per ton on lead, is 
hailed with great pleasure. Mine owners 
of the leading silver lead districts say that 
there will be a general revival of lead min- 
ing in the Slocan, Nelson, Lardea and other 
parts where stagnation has been marking 
the industry. Influential owners in the 
Kootenay are quoted as saying that in a 
month after the bonus is granted at least 
fifteen mines now closed will return to the 
producing list. It is specially noted with 
satisfaction that the bonus is on lead ores, 
which gives the mining man the benefit, not 
the refiner. 

• • • 

p 

Another of the big cargoes of steel rails 
for the C.P.R. has arrived. The British 
ship Melgwy nn from Rotterdam, with 2,000 
tons of steel, is discharging at the C.P.R. 
wharf in this port, there being no more 
room at the Port Moody wharf, where the 
last two vessels were discharged. 

• # • 

A slight break in the price of glass is 
noted, the reduction being 25c. per square. 
The stocks expected from the Old Country 
via sailing ship have been received. 

• * # 

Most lines of hardware have been rather 
firm for some time, little change being noted, 
and no reductions hitherto. Some prices 
may be given to show the average selling 
figures, in a jobbing way, at present : Par 
iron, $3 ; Jessop's steel, 15c; horseshoes, 
$5 and $5.25, as to size ; horse nails, oval 
head, $3.05 ; do., C.S. head, $2.90; screws, 
80-10 off list ; carriage bolts, 40 p.e. off 
list; cut nails, $3.60; wire do., $3.75 ; 
ropi, n anila, 15M-c; boiled oil, 85c; white 
36 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

KIRE BRICKS, EIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

. . FULL STOCK . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWEfPiPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specially. 

* CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON, 0NT. TORONTO. ONT. 
ST. JOHNS. QUF 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Ca lings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
i r qui'ed; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 

! 'urn ■ '-s. 



u 



MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connullsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Price to Sales Agents 

Orummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND, ONT. 



Limited 



THE MARKETS 



rdwiro »nd 
M.i.l 



lead, $7.50; putty, $3.50; barbed wire, 
$4 ; glass, first break, $4.50 ; turps, $8 -'<> 
per case. 

Geo. S. H. Perry. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto, Jul} 10, 1903 

HARDWAHt£. 

AN exceptional activity for Julj coo 
tinues, hardware jobbers finding 
difficulty in filling orders tor many 
lines, notably harvesting tools, such as 
hues, rakes, snaths, scythes, cradles, 
forks, grind stones, etc. The demand lor 
tinware and graniteware, builders 
hardware, tenting wire, nails, and 
staples lias also been particularly 

active during the pasl week. The de 
mand tor some lines lias been so press- 
ing, that, while travellers have reported 
gooil sales, many customers have not 
waited for them, hut have sent in their 
orders by mail. The shortage of several 
sizes of screws, carriage and tire bolts, 
cordayc. binges, locks, knolis and butts, 
is still affecting trade. No changes in 
prices are reported, but manufacturers of 

wire and cut nails, screws. rivets and 
burrs, spikes, horseshoes, bolts and nuts, 
b&ve materially shortened their terms of 
sale. Instead of 1 months or :'. per Cent. 
oli at 30 days, the terms of past years, 
the} now oiler (ill net. or 2 per cent, off 
.'ill days. The general tendency of prices 

is firm. 

BAEB WIRE.— A Eairly good demand is 
reported : prices steady, the base being 
82.55 from Cleveland and iUc less in car- 
lots. From stock, Toronto, §2.80. 

GALVANIZED WJJRE. Trade keeps up 
excellently. We quote as follows: No. 0, 
7 and 8, S3. 15 to §3.35 per 100 lb. ; No. 
9, §2.50 ; No. 10, $3.20 to §3.40 ; No. 
11, §3.25 to §3.45; No. 12, §2.65; No. 
13, §2.75 ; No. 14, §3.75 to §3.95 ; No. 
15, §4.30 ; No. 16, §4.55. Nos. 6 to 
9 base from Cleveland are quoted at 
$2 .27 A in less than earlots and at §2.15 
in earlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WlltE— The demand 
is larger than anticipated, sorting orders 
coming in freely. Base price is §2.50 per 
100 tb. Oiling, 10c; coppering, 60c; and 
tinning, §2 per 100 lb. extra. Shipping 
points, Toronto, Hamilton, London, and 
Montreal, with freights equalized on 
those points. 

COIL SPRING WIRE.-^A large volume 
of sorting business is reported ; prices 
continue steadv. We quote as follows: 
No. 9, §2.75; No. 11, §3.40; No. 12, 
§2.95. Freight up to 25c. per 100 lb. 
allowed on 500 lb. or over. Carlots of 
15 tons, 5c less, with freight up to 20c 
allowed. 

WIRE NAILS.— A fair business contin 
ues, as building operations throughout 
the country seem particular]} active. 
We (piote as follows: ('allots. 

$2 lii. and small lots, $2.45 per keg E.o.b. 

Gananoque. Montreal. London, Hamil- 
ton, Toronto. Brantford, Windsor, Out.. 
and St. John. 

CUT NAILS.— A fair sorting busines 
keeps up at |2.50 per keg t.o.b. Toronto. 

HORSE NAILS.— A fair trade is doing 
at steady prices. We quote : " C" 
brand, oval head. In and 10 and 7* per 
cent.; on " .Monarch." 60 per cent., and 
" Countersunk" head, 55 per cent.; on 
" Peerless," 45 and 7^ per cent. 

HORSESHOES Business has assumed 



i volume tbifl week and pi e . 

steady. We quote t.o.b. Toronto Iron 

. No. 2 and larger, |3.80 . No. I and 
smaller, $4.05. Steel, new light 
No. 2 and larger, $3.95 , No. 1 and 

smaller, $4.20 Snow ihoes, No. 2 and 
largei . 14 06 ; No i and lighter, $4.30. 

If snipped from factory, M» t<> l.v. |. 
SCREW S \ ood d< miand com u 
with a shi .i i age In Borne 

We quote as follows: Flat head bl 
,s7.|, pel cent discount; round head 
bright, B24 pei cent ; Hat bead brass, 80 
pei eeni , round bead b 

round head bronze, 70 per cent.; Hat bead 

bronze, 75 pei cent. 

RIVETS AND 111 BRS I here is a fair 
trade at stead} prices. Quotation! 

are as follows : Iron rivel , 60 and 

ll) per cent, discount ; iron burrs, .">."> per 

cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 15 per cent. 

I'.ol.'l S AND Nl is. Carriage and tire 

bolts and several si/es of nuts are --till 

: prices stead} . \\ e quote; Can iagu 

bolts, common ($1 lisl ). 50 and L0 pei 
cent.; carriage bolts, full square ($2.40 
list), .")."> and 10 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron ($3 list), 55 and 10 per 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50, 5 and 
10 per cent.; coach screws, cone points, 
(it' 2 :', and III per cent. 

BINDER TWINE. The market is firm. 
The bulk of the output has been con 
tracted for and prices are now firm. 
We quote as follows : 650 ft., 

13( ; 600 ft., 12c; 560 ft., I 1,1c; 500 ft., 
KUc. 

CORDAGE. Jobbers are having diffi- 
culty in keeping up their stocks of some 
sizes. We quote as follows : Pure manila, 
IIAc; British pun; manila, 12c.; 

sisal. IUc: double lathyarn, ll.'c; 
single lathyarn, I lc; double shingleyarn, 
llJrc; single shingleyarn, lie; sashcord, 
25 to 30c. 

LAWN mOW ERS.- There is net much 
doing now. Prices steadv. We quote 
Woodyatt, 12 in., §7.50 ; 14 In., $8 ; 16- 
im, $8.50 ; bS-in., $9 ; 20 -in., $10 ; Star, 
12 -in.. $5.50; 14-in., §5.75; 10 in., 86; 
Daisy, 12 -in., $4.90; 14-in., §5.10; 16- 
in.. $5.30; Ontario, 12 in., $14.25; 14-in.. 
$15.80; 16-in., $16.80; 18-in., §18.90; 20 
in.. $20.50 ; Philadelphia, 12-in., §6.50 ; 
14-in., $7; 16-in., §7.50. Discount, 40 
and 10 to 50 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE \ND FITTINGS.- From all 
reports the trade offer no objection to 
the decision of manufacturers that after 
the end of this year no light soil pipe 
should be made. A fair trade is doing. 
Discounts are as follows ; Light 

soil pipe, 15 and 5 per cent.; light 
soil pipe fittings, 50 and 5 per cent.; 
medium and extra heavy pipe and In 
tines. 55 and 5 per cent.; 7 and Bin. 
pipe, 10 and 5 per cent. 

BRASS GOODS— There is an excellent 
demand for brass goods for waterworks 
fittings, largely from municipal works. 

BUILDING PAPER. A fairly good 
trade continues in all lines. We quote 
as follows: Tarred felt, §1.S5 per 

100 lb.; 2-ply ready roofing, 95c. per roll; 
3 ply, $1.20 per roll ; carpel felt, $2.80 

per 100 II).; dry sheathing. tOc. per roll ; 
tar sheathiiie, 50c. per roll; dry fibre, 50c 
per roll : tarred fibre, 65c. per roll. O K 
and 1 X L, 70c per roll, heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

POl LTItt NFTTINi; \ moderate sale 

reported. Prices are nominally at 'i' 1 per 
cent, for 2 in. mesh, 19 W.g.J and 50 per- 
cent for 2-in. mesh, 16 w.g. 
37 



OAKEY'S 



The original and only Genuine icd 

parallon for Cleaning Cutlery. 

6d. and M. Caqistert. 



WELLINGTON 



i 



KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUrAUTUHEHH or 

Ornery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MOvtiik ^ l 



Ah COVERT MFG. CO 

West Troy, N.Y 

Auto Screw Jack 

/IjG^i Harness Snaps Chain, Kope and Web 
t ' 'J> Goods, etc. 

POR SALE BV JOBBERS AT MPKS. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

la^U-.,, *V^<Pl,arirort Variety, 

•* Toilet, Hand, Klrctric Power 

ARE THE BEST. 

IliKlii-Bt Quality (.morning and 

MM-r|,-> lira ring Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
Amerlefco Shearer Hfg. Co., Naabaa, N.ll.,1 N 





NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all :he qualities deslrablfc In a Dour Closet 
They work silently and effectually, and never gel 
out of order. In use in many of the public build- 
ings iliniiiKliout (treat Britain and the Colonies. 
MAIIK SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 




You will be asked 
for Dundas Axes 
next fall. Are you 
preparing to meet 
the inquiry by be- 
ing able to show 
the goods ? 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. I. HaHmand Jr., Eastern Agent, Montreal 






Their cost is so trifling 

and their convenience so great tliat tbe wonder is 
that merchants do without RUBBER STAMPS. 

Toll us what you would like and we'll tell 
you the coat, 

C. 0. Young Co., i Adelaide E., Toronto 



Hardware and 

Mc-lal 



THE MARKETS 




High-Grade 
Files and Rasps 

Largest Manufacturers 
in the World. 



Sever* Factories. Seven Brands, 

►lay be purchased from all Prominent Hardware Merchants. 

Walter Grose, Selling Agent, Montreal. DOMINION WORKS, PORT HOPE, CANADA. 



Tbe Dennis Wire and Iron Co., 

LONDON. ONT. 

WIRE WINDOW GUARDS 

IRON ROOF CRESTING 

STABLE FITTINGS 

IRON STAIRS 
OFFICE AND BANK RAILINGS 

METAL SASH BARS 

Ornamental Wire, Iron and Brass Work. 

■ ial Terms to the Hardware Trade. 
Bend for Catalogue. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ot 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Hilled Work, Engine Studs. 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



'^^■■-v NEW 

Rails 



12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 35 and 56 lbs, to 
the Yard -carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 



Sessenwein Bros*. 



103 Shannon St. 

. . MONTREAL. 



S( KEEN l)()t»i; 
done 



lair Musi- 



3-in. style, 20c. per doz- 



seasorj 

on.' ill 

I I I ' I ! I | I I I I I 



a. i nere is a 

in these. We quote : 

n doors, common, 2 or 3 panel, waJ 
nut stained, 1 in. Btyle, $6.80; stained, 
yellow or green, *7 ; in natural colors, 
i'il Gnish, $8. IS ; 
i ii I. 

I'l.l MBING l-'IYll RES. The 
has been a particularly active 
earthenware goods, and a lair 
continues at steady juices. 

Rl BBER II" ks are practically 

■old up, and retailers may have trouble 
in L r ''l tin<_r sorting orders tilled promptly. 
J. awn standard is now quoted at 5Jc. 
I •■! It. lor .'. iii. and <W,c. per ft. for J in. 

FORK HANDLES rhere is a brisk 
business at the new discount. ."(! per cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. Not much doing 
in this line this week. We quote per cwt. 
as Follows : J ill. \ I. I .\ in . S| 7.") ; 5 16- 
in. I •">. 6-in., 14.50; g 'in x 6, 7, 8-in., 
*4.25 : 7 16 in i 7 - in., $4.10 : A-in. x 
9, 10, 1-2 in.. |3.9Q. The discount is 20 
■nt. 

TINWARE WD K\ WII'.I.W \l;K The 
demand continues active, especially for 
Bach line~ as arc used for preserving 
purposes. Prices are unchanged. 

WOODENWARE \ good demand is 

reported in this. Prices are steadj as 

follows : Washboards \ ictor, SI. 25 ; 

• ; Improved Globe, $] . 15 . 

Standard Globe, 11.55; Original Solid 

Superior, bo lid back, i 
Jubilee, $1.85 : Pony, $1.05 I ube \., 
I : No. I. $S ; No. -'. $7 ; No. ■;, $6. 

1 I MIA I \n active trade i, reported. 

are unchanged. \\>- quote 

•< rorontO, at follow Canadian 

Portland 50 ; German, $2 Ifl 



to §2.50 ; English, §2.30 to §2.50 ; hy- 
draulic. §1.50. Small quantities arc 15 
to 25c. higher. 

METALS. 

While this is not the time of year when 
large buying oiilers are being placed, the 
\olume of business is large lor July, in- 
dicating a continuance of the manufac- 
turing activity of the early part of the 
year. I he markets generally are stead;. 
here. In the larger baying centres iron 
and steel are firm ; tin is lower in New 
\ ork ; copper has stiffened ; lead is 
steady. Other lines are unchanged. 

I'M. IRON.— The market is quiet, but a 
steady feeling prevails as to prices. We 
quote f.o.b. lor. into, Hamilton and Mid 
land. No. I, $22 ; Sydney. No. I, <?20 ; 
No. I, Jarrow, tf2i ; No. 2, Sumxnerlec, 
$25. 

BAR IRON.-— A good business is repor- 
ted in this, with prices fairly steady. 
The base price is now #2. For extras, 
cut to length while rolling : 2 ft. and 
over, MJc. per J 00 lb.; I ft. and under 2 
ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 20c; over 20 ft., by 
special agreement, according to length 
and size. 

STEEL BOILEB PLATES.- There is a 

fair demand. The base price is $1.9(3 

f.O.b. Toronto. 

TOOL STEEL.- A good trade con- 
tinues in this. We quote as follows : 
" B C" and " Bla.k Diamond," 10 to 
lie; Jessop's, .Morton's and Firth's, 
I lc: Jonas iV Colver's, 10 to 20c; ditto, 

\ir Hardening," 70c, per lb. ; < ha 
Leonard's, 8 to 9c; Park's " Silver," 12 
to lie; Mark's "Special," 15 to 20c. 

MACHINERY STEEL. The activity 

38 



continues, with prices firm at $2 to $2.05 
f.o.b. Toronto. - 

COKE. — In good demand. Quotations 
range from $6.75 to ?,7. 15 for 72-hr., and 
*5.50 for 48-hr. furnace coke, f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

BLACK SHEETS.— A good steady de 
maud is reported, both from stock and 
lor import, at unchanged prices. tie 
quote as follows: Common, $3.lo 
lor 2S gauge and dead Hat, J$o\50 for 20 
gauge. 

CANADA .PLATES.— There is not much 
doing. Prices are steady. We quote : 
All dull, $2.90 to $3 j half-polished, >2.n> 
in $3.10/, and all-bright, HiJ./o to #cJ.So. 

GALVANIZED SimiJUTS. The activity 
continues. \\e quote: Queen's Mead, $4.t>0 
for 2s gauge ; American, $4.40 for 2 1 
gauge ; liell brand, §4.30 for 28 gauge ; 
Gordon Crown, §4.50 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. — The INevv York market lias fallen 
somewhat, but there is no change here. 
Prices are steady. We quote $33 to 
$33.25. 

TINPLATES. — In fair demand, [mporl 
orders are now arriving freely. \\ .■ quote 
as follows: Charcoals, $4.75 to ' s 5, 
and cokes, §1.25 to §4.50 per box. 

COPPER. — A brisk demand continuot 
for ingot. Business in sheets is slow. 

We quote: Insuit copper, $15, and si I 

eppcr. $21 to $22 per 100 lb. 

BRASS. — Unchanged in price and in 
good demand. Discount, 10 per cent. 

LEAD. The demand keeps up nicely 
and the market continues linn. We 
quote as follows : $3.50 per 100 lb. for 
pig lead, and $3.75 for bar lead. 

IRON PIPE The activity which ha- 

been manifest for several weeks colli in 



THE MARKETS 



11. 






ae Prices are steady. We quote 

Per 100 ft.: Black pipe, .'in.. >:; 15 
i in., 82.40 ; 9 m., •s-J.d.') ; 4 in., 82 
•; in., $3.65 ; ! in.. 85.26 ; I | in , |7 .:?."> ; 
i. 1 . in. 88.95; -Jin., $12.55; 2.', in., 820; 
:i in., $23 ; :',:. in., 830 ; l in., 836. 

ZINC SPELTER. 'I here is a more ac 
tive demand at <>,| to 64c. per tt>. 

ZINC SHEETS. We < | ii»»t<- base price 
as follows : Cask lots, IjjIi.Tij to $7, ami 
pari rusks, $7 to 87.25. 

SOLDEK. In good demand. Price* 
are unchanged. Guaranteed half-and-half 
is quoted at 18 to L9c, and wiping 17 to 
18c. 

HIOEH, SKINU AND WOOL.. 

HIDES. --No. 1 green, 8c; No. 2 green, 

7c. per Hi.; No. 1 green, steers, 8ic; No. 
2 green, steers, 74c per lb.; cured, per 
tb., 8 to 8£c. 
CALFSKINS.- Veal skins, No I, G to 

1 I lb. inclusive, 9c.; No. 2, 7c; No. 1, 15 
to 20 Hi. inclusive, 8c; No. 2, 6c l)ea- 
rons (dairies), each, (it) to 70c. Lamb 
skins, each 2") to 30c; pelts, each, 20 to 
2,5c, 

WOOL. — Unwashed wool, per tb., 8 to 
'.•c; lleece wool, 14i to l">\c; pulled 
wools, super, per lb., 15c; extra, 18c 

TALLOW. — We quote 5 to 5£c per tb. 
OLD MATERIAL.. 

The demand continues active an- 1 
prices are well maintained. Dealers quote 
as follows : Heavy copper and wire, I I .', o. 
per lb.; light copper, lOc per lb.; heavy 
red brass, 10^c. per tb.; heavy yellow 
brass, 8^c per tb.; light brass, lie; lead, 

2 Ac .; scrap zinc, 3Jc.J iron, No. 1 
wrought, §14 per net ton ; No. 2 
wrought, §5 ; machinery cast scrap, 816 . 
Stove plate, SI I ; malleable and steel, 
§7 ; old rubbers, (>|c. per tb., and coun- 
try mixed rags, 50c per 100 tb. 



Practical Capability. 



MORE AID TO STEEL INDUSTRY 
r I~^ HR Dominion Government on Wed 

nesdav evening introduced the 
measure promised to grant further 
aid to the iron and steel industries. The 
terms are as below : 

1. — The Oovernor hi-Council may auth- 
orize payment of the following bounties 
on the undermentioned articles manufac- 
tured in Canada, from steel produced in 
Canada, from ingredients of which not 
less than 50 |>cr cent, of the weight 
thereof consists of pig iron made in Can 
ada. That is to say (a) On rolled, 
round wire rods, not over 2-8 in. in 
diameter, when sold to wire manufactur- 
ers for use in making wire in their Own 
factories in Canada, a bounty of $6 per 
ton. |b) On rolled angles, tees, chan 
nets, beams, joists. girders, or bridge 
building or structural rolled sections, and 
on other rolled shapes, not round, OVal, 
square or flat, weighing not less than -5") 
Hi. per lineal yard, and also on Hat eye 
bar blanks, when sold for consumption 
in Canada, a bounty of $3 per ton. (c) 
On rolled plates, not less than 30 in. in 
width and not less than J in. in thick 
ncss, when sold for consumption in Can 
ada for manufacturing purposes, for 
which such plates are usually required, 
and not to include plates to be sheared 






Isn't that the necessity *\ 
in building materials i 









Most experienced builders all over the country use our 

Sheet Metal Building Materials 

Because they are honest, capable goods that give the acme of 
artistic effect as well as sterling endurance. 

We make every conceivable need in Shingles, Ceilings, Sidings, etc. 

To sell our goods is to secure the best trade. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 

TORONTO MONTREAL WINNIPEG 






^^^+k^^^+fc^+kd*+fc*k^^i?^^^^^^^^^*k'k'k f *b 



into plates of less width, a bounty of 83 
per ton. 

2 The Go vernor-in- Council may make 

regulations to carry out the intention of 
the foregoing section. 
3.— Chapter 8 of the Statutes of L899 

be SO amended as to provide that the 
bounty on steel and iron, authorized by 
chapter 6 Of the Statutes of 1897, shall 
be continued until dune 30, 1007, and 
that the rates of such bounties shall be 
as follows: — (a) From duly I. L903, to 
dune 30, 1011 1, both inclusive, shall -lie 90 
per cent, of the amount ' fixed by said 
chapter 6 of the Statutes of 1897. (b) 
From duly I, 1904, to dune 30, L905, 
both inclusive, the bounty shall be 7.") per 
cent, of the amount fixed by the said 
chapter. (c) From duly I, 1905, to dune 
30, 1906, both inclusive, the bounty shall 

lie 55 per cent. of the amount fixed by 
the said chapter. (dj From duly I, I'.HIIi. 
to dune 30, 1907, both inclusive, the 
bounty shall be 35 per cent, of the 
amount fixed by the said chapter. 



vessels of the c panj 't Heel 

\n option has been secured from one of 

the Niagara Falls power con. panic- Foi 

6,000 horse power of electric power. It 

is proposed to erect a great industrial 
OOmpanj there, and to manufacture all 
of the steel product that will be sold in 
Canada and throughout the world out- 
side of the United States. 

The new plant will not compete with 
the American plant of the company for 
the United States trade, which will be 
served from the present plants of the 
company at Carnegie, Pittsburg and 

other domestic point-. 

Threatened tariff legislation in England 
and in the English possessions through 

out the world, and the proposed ship 
canal from Port Colborne to the Atlantic 
Ocean are said to In' the actuating mo 
tives for the new plant. 



THE STEEL TRUST'S CANADIAN 
PLANT 

ANEW YOLK despatch says that 
officials of the United States Steel 
Corporation to-day announce that 

work will be begun shortly on the new 
plant of that company at Port Colborne, 
Ontario. Canada, where a large tract of 
land has been acquired for that purpose. 
The despatch states that concession- 
from the Dominion Government have been 
secured for the dredging of all immense 
basin or harbor at the junction of the 
Welland Canal and Lake Erie, which will 
lie of sufficient size to harbor the sea 

39 



GUN CATALOGUE FOR THE TRADE 

LEWIS BROS. & CO., Montreal and 
Toronto, have just issued their pun 
catalogue, No. 30. It contains 
well -illustrated descriptions of tlnir 
complete line of puns, ammunition, 
etc. The more staple guns arc included 
in the Rrsl pages, and arc followed bj re- 
peating rifles of the popular makers. 

Revolvers, cartridges, reloading tools 
and luintcrs'apparcl follow in order named, 
the last pupes being devoted to police 
goods a ''d skates. A belter prade of paper 
is used than that usually found in similar 
catalogues, thus showing the details of 
illustrations to a better advantage. 

The printed prices are subject to a 
special discount, a copy of which is fur- 
nished the dealer. To readers of HARD- 
WARE anp Metal who have not as yel 
received "Gun Catalogue, No. 30," Lewis 
Bros. & Co. would be pleased to mail a 
copy upon application. 



hardware and metal 



ST. JOHN HARBOR IMPROVEMENTS. 

r 'PMIi: people of St. John, N.B., have a 

1 livelj faith in the future of Canada, 

and, more, the courage to back 

faith by investments which will 

.: future begins to be 

St. John has spenl over 

three- million dollars on its 

, wiih little or no help from the 

Their enterprise is to be com- 

and now thej come forward 

with .1 scheme to increase their harbor 

mmodation. 

Tin.- accompanying cut from TheSt.John 

raph will indicate the lin«. ^ on which 

it is proposd to operate. 

The plan, which was tirst conceived by 
Superintendent James Oborne, o\ the 
C.P.R., and submitted by him to the 
Board o( Trade and City Council, is most 
comprehensive by providing berths lor 
thirtj more steamers. It is to be hoped 
that the Dominion Government, from 
whom, as has previously been noted, 
they are asking assistance, will give the 
matter a generous consideration. 

The new work would start, according to 
Mr. Oborne's views, at the present C.P.R. 
wharf on the harbor front, Sand Point, 
and run down the harbor to the Beacon 
light, giving the firsl five slips shown 11 
additional steamer berths. These slips, as 
shown by the plan, would be 670 feet long 
by 250 wide. 

Then from the Beacon towards Fort 
Dufferin would be a line of live more piers, 
double ones, giving accommodation for 18 
or 20 more steamers. These slips would 
be 1,200 feet long by 300 wide. The 
curved lines represent railway tracks 
which would serve each berth and in the 
immense yard which the) would traverse 
would be room for more than 50 miles of 
tracks. 

Extending from Fori Duflerin to Part- 
ridge Island along the line of the present 
breakwater, would be an esplanade, per- 
hap> 1,000 feet wide, with roadway and 
street car lines. The lines marked " pro- 
posed boulevard" and "breakwater" 
show only the beginning of the proposed 
esplanade ; it would extend to the island, 
act as a breakwater and also, on the shore 
side, give room for more steamer berths. 

Mr. Oborne's idea is that the pier> run- 
ning to the Beaton should be built at once, 
and the other work would be for the 
future. 




USES OF ASBESTOS 

Till! order of the insur- 
ance commissioners 
that all wires in New 
York's new subway shall 
be insulated with asbestos, 
and that the roofs and floors 
of all subway cars shall be 
protected with asbestos mill 
board, calls attention to 
the valuable qualities of a 
mineral that we hardly 
w^xjstt^l a quarter of 
a "century ago. It looks as 
if asbestos would be a 
great boon to mankind. 

It is only a little over a 
quarter of a century since 
the discovery of asbestos. 
It is the only fireproof fibre 
in the world. To look at 
some of the beautiful arti- 
cles woven from it, we can 
hardly conceive that asbes- 
tos is a mineral, and in its 
2? rj%live state looks just like 
any ordinary rock to the 
untrained eye. An asbestos 
mine is, indeed, in simplest 
expression, merely a rock 
quarry. But from this 
stone it is possible to manu- 
facture a suit of clothes. 

Formerly asbestos was 
chiefly used as a covering 
for superheated pipes. Its 
usefulness is spreading 
daily. It is made into 
theatre curtains and stage 
appliances, table cloths, 
wall paper, lining for safes, 
and so on. Ground, it is 
manufactured, with color- 
ing matter, into fireproof 
paint and into a cement 
tiling for floors of sky 
scrapers. 

So far, Canada furnishes 
nearly all the asbestos of 
the world, though several 
mines are being developed 
in this country. The Cana- 
dian mines are in Ontario 
and Cjuebec Provinces. 
The value of Canada's out- 
put in 1901 the last year 
of compiled statistics was 
$1,186,434. Two-thirds of 
this comes to the United 
States. The milling pro- 
cess, whereby the fibre is 
released from stone, is a 
secret. It is done at the 
mines. - New York Com- 
mercial. 



40 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



POSTAL SCALES REGULATIONS 

T1IK Weights and Measures Act has 
been amended during the present 
session of the Dominion Parlia- 
ment by adding to Section 29, of the 

said act. the following subsection, \ iz. : 
" Postal scales, when engraved and 
stamped as such, and of B capacity not 

exceeding four pounds, and not used for 

trade purposes, may he sold without in 

sped ion under such regulations as the 
Department of Inland Revenue prescribes; 
but any person Using such scales for 
other than postal purposes shall he liable 
to the penalties prescribed by subsection 
1 of this section." 



A TYPICAL CASE OF EXPANSION. 

A DESPATCH from Lumsden. N.W.T., 
gives in a brief sketch an illustra 
tion of the effect of the remarkable 
immigration into the Canadian North 
west. The despatch says: " Everj 
day's train brought in from 10 to 20 
men ; soon every homestead available 
was secured, and considerable of the 
choice land bought up. Prices have 

ranged from ST to 830 per acre for un- 
broken land. The four local implement 
dealers were soon taxed to the uttermost 

to supplj the demand for machinery, and 
it is safe to say that tributary to this 
market the new land under cultivation 
has increased 30 per' cent. Many have 
erected temporary abodes, but some few 
brought their families and outfits along, 
and are comfortably settled. The major- 
ity of these newcomers are Americans 

and Germans, who have had practical 
farming experience heretofore. 

" In the village 25 buildings have been 
erected thus far this season, costing- in 
all about 850,000, among which worthy 
of note is Balfour Rros.' brick store and 
bank building, which will cost in the 
neighborhood of SI5.000. On every side 
also the farmers are erecting fine large 
barns and residences. 

" The lines of business to newly open 
are a branch of the Union Bank of Can- 
ada, a law office, two real estate agen 
cies, confectionery and fruit business, 
harness shop, dressmaking and millinery 
establishment ; and it is expected another 
grain elevator will be built during the 
Summer." 



THE VETERAN SALESMAN. 

IN an address on " People the Hard 
wareman Meets," a retailer pays the 
following tribute to the veteran 
traveller : " There is another character 
that you often meet, in a class all by 
himself, different from anyone else with 
whom you have to do. I mean the old 
steady reliable travelling salesman, not 
the fellow that "spiels" so cheerily one 
year for the biggest show on earth and 
the next Dobs up serenely for some one 
else, then the third, changes both house 
and territory, but the man that has visited 
you regularly for. lo. these many years. 
Every 30 or 60 days he has come into 
your store with a smile on his face and 
ready to crack some new joke, or tell 
some anecdote of wit or wisdom just as 
if sorrow and care were an unknown 
quantity in his world and he had lost 
the formula for finding it. You never saw 
a shade on his face. He is well posted in 
his line of goods or he could not have 
held his job so long, and many times 
you have profited by his advice. He has 
stood between you and the house in 



times of drought and threatened di 

The favors anil small serv ice h 
done you have been times without num 

her. Sometimes in the qniet of the i 
ing, waiting a delayed train, after the 

orders have all been picked up. he ninv 
unburden himself to V"ii. and you find 

that the core and sorrows of life are as 

common to his kind as to any others, 
but he has sehooled himself to COnce&l 
his feelings from the outside world. Pea 

eh. me. • it ma\ be an invalid wife or way 
ward son. and you realize that many a 
bright Bally of wit has been made with 

tin' vision of a suffering loved one before 

him and the heart sore within. But 
win-lexer' he mav be or whatever' his 
name, here's to him and mav he nevei be 

less." 



THE OBLIGING CLERK 

THERE exists no reason why all 
clerks should not be obliging, says 
an exchange. Employers and pa 
trons alike have the right to expect 
courteous service, but they don't always 
get it. It costs so little to be obliging, 
anyway, that for his own good or her 

own good every clerk should cultivate 
the politeness which is a buyer's due. 
whether or' not he or' she is the happy 
possessor- of the virtue. 

The obliging clerk is a source of profit 
to the employer. Many times is it the 
case that customers will walk up to 

certain clerks for certain goods, and will 
even wait, should those clerk S be busy. 
until such times as they are at liberty 
to serve them. Simply the natural out 
come of the buyer's wish to be politely 

served. These clerks practically build up 
n little trade of their own. which fre- 
quently follows them to other stores, 
should circumstances make a change of 
base necessary. Tn fact, there are some 
clerks who actually consider the matter 
in the light of a valuable testimonial 
regarding their services, which it really 
is. and use it as a lever- to produce a 
better that usual salarv. 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. J. R. Mackay, represeting Caver- 
hill, Learmont & Co., has gone on a holiday 
trip to Scotland, accompanied by Mrs. 
Mackay. 

Mr. J. L. Sampson, for six years a popu- 
lar employe of White Bros., hardware mer- 
chants, Collingwood, Ont., has secured the 
position of travelling representative of The 
Fairbanks Valve and Scale Co., New York. 

r Mr. Albert Dupuis, electrical contractor 
and engineer, Montreal, has left for a busi- 
ness trip through England, France, Germam- 
and Switzerland. 

Mr. Wm. Beatty, of The Beatty Stove 
and Hardware Co., 76 York street, Toron- 
to, left on Saturday for an extended trip 
through the Southern States. 

Mr. J. P. McNaughton, late of Messrs. 
Lamplough & McNaughton, who has re- 
cently been appointed travelling sales agent 
of The Dominion Iron and Steel Co., is at 
present at Sydney. Mr. McNaughton re- 
turns in a week or so to Montreal and 
Toronto in the interests of his company. 

41 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Act veil iseriient s Ullller llli* lldl'lilic., 2C. ■ UUpl 

i-.Tiiuii: Ic. ii word each inbtequenl i r i - « ■ i r i . > 1 1 . 
cash tn advance. Letters, figure*, and abbrei 
each count m ">» word in estimating 1 1 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



TINSMITH WANi Manitoba— all- 

around, good man for inside and outside 
work; also furnace work, country town; Iteod) 
work ; must be steady ; wages $16.50 per week. 
Write Merrick, Anderson & (Jo., Winnipeg, Man. 

f 

MOULDERS — First-class non-union men ; high- 
est wages ; cheap living; steady work year 
round. Western Foundry Co., Limited, Wing- 
ham, Ont. f 

\\f A NT ED— At once — a first -class lathe hand — 

** for planing mill ; highest wages and steady 

employment for right man. The Blonde Lumber 

and Manufactu ing Co.. Limited, Chatham (int. 

t 

WANTED — Immediately — several first-class cab- 
inetmakers and mechanics, accustomed 10 
woodworking with tools; permanent position. 
Apply The I). W. Karn Co.. Limited, Woodstock, 
Ont. I 

WANTLD — Three capable steam and hot water 
fitte.s; state wages expected. Purvis Bros., 
Sudbury. f 

WANTED — For wholesale hardware specialties 
— thorough, practical, experienced man to 
look after stock, orders, buying, etc. Good oppor- 
tunity. Write, giving outline of experience, to 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 28-2 

WANTED — Three capable steam and hot water 
fitters; state wages expected I'urvis Bros., 
Sudbury. f 

V\j ANTED — A number of first-class stonecutters 
* ' to cut Ohio stone. Geo. Ritchie, 491 King 
William street, Hamilton. f 

WANTED — Immediately — several firs't-class 
cabinetmakers and mechanics, accustomed 
to woodworking with tools ; permanent position. 
Apply The D. W. Karn Co.. Limited, Woodstock. 
Ont. f 



SITUATIONS WANTED. 



YOUNG man with twelve years' experience in 
wholesale and retail hardware desires situa- 
tion, either inside or on the road. Box 89, Hard- 
w vkk and Metal. 17-2 



Hardware and Metal 

has inquiries from time to time 
from manufacturers and others wanting 
representatives in the leading business 
centres b»-re and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their names 
and addresses placed on a special list kept 
for the information of inquirers in our var- 
ious offices throughout Canada and in 
Great Britain without charge. 

Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto. 



M»rciw»re* and 



Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



ry bants does the 

,ve of greater 
to the hardware mar 
, [ino like lii-. where the 
are apt to occupy so 
so untidyi fixtures 
. the holding of these 
will take the place .-f many 
,,,.] i"" s ide a meth- 
ods that would, under 
other circumstances, have to be brought 
into tit- centre of tin- floor for their 
proper display to a customer. One «>f 
the advantage* of t In- fixtures in use in 
a hardware Btore is. that they can be 
made bj an> man who is only fairlj 
band> with tools, and the very articles 
he has in stock are in most cases the 
only ' ired in tlif making. 

In the cuts shown this week an English 

trade journal. The Ironmonger, shows 

some contrivances used by hardwareinen 

in London, Ens:.. for the display of their 

Is. 




I -how- a home-made wrought 
iron bracket, which affords a ledge for a 
jbclf and a notch for a rail, along 
which pliers, wire-cutters and pincers can 
1„. .ii-| la ■ 'I to advantage. The bar or 
r<«l n-.-<l was about :'. 1 or 3-6-in. in size. 
Tin- fixture provides a far neater ar 
• in'iit of thi-i- small tools than a 
wire which Bags in tin- centre, ami in ad 
dition can In- used for the displaj of 
almost any articles bj means of hooks 
thrown ovei tin- bar. 

I b "J. was |)ieke<l up in a Yorkshire 
town and has been used to advantage in 
mam stores in Canada. The circle is a 
board about 20-in. in diameter, covered 
with <_ r "''-n baize. Bound tin- edge "i 
this saw- of ail kinds were clamped, 
wh i U- the centre was filled with -mall flat 
tools, such as callipers, wrenches, gauges, 
steel squares, etc \ -imilar fixture has 
• , |j dew ribed in t bese col 
tunns. 



Fig. 3. represents a permanently fixed 
wire grid, which is used not only for the 
tools shown. Inn also for heavy goods of 
any kind, such as pails ami enamelled 




Flu. 2. 

ware. The frame fitted the top of the 
window and was hung about three inches 
below the ceiling. 

Fig. I. is a contrivance for stocking and 
displaving garden spades, forks, ami 
shovels. It will he found invaluable 
where spare is limited and the ceilings 
fairly lofty. fn the picture, the openings 
of the joists are made use of, but this is 
not necessary as the tracks or bars can 
be fastened a few inches below the ceiling 
where the joists arc not exposed. 



TENDENOIES OF THE TIMES 



r p UK long anc 

in the ret 



1 rapid strides forward 



says Charles S. Barger in The 
Merchants' Record, call to view the old 
farmer who came to the city some weeks 
ago with a ton of hay drawn by his 
favorite team of mlules. He left his load 
in the street and stepped in to warm. 
He chanced to enter a room where were 
lone rows of photographs, and dozens of 
people were dropping their nickels into 
the s| ( ,t and puttiiiLr the tubes to their 
ears to hear a song, a merry conversa- 
tion, a waltz. or a grand march by 
Sousa's band. This was all new to the 
farmer and he had no idea what to ex- 




pect. fie put his coin in. adjusted the 
tubes and instantly Sousa's grand march 
began. The old man dropped the tubes 
like he was shot and made for the door 
exclaiming, "He gosh, 1 never tied them 
42 



mules, and there comes that fool band 
down the street." 

Gp back a decade or score of years and 
see ( he retail hardware dealer in his 
den. Towards the rear of his small room 

was a plain common stove, surrounded 

by a frame Idled with sand that Served 
both lor lire protection and a spittoon 
lor the jokers. Coal oil lamps with tin 
reflectors furnished the light. His stock 
consisted of a few keys of nails : tin 
CUDS ; cast iron tea kettles and wash 
boilers ; a few dash churns , strap nine 
es and thumb latches for house hardware. 
with common heaters for soft ooal ; cast 
boa stoves for wood and the old "Black 
Hetty" for cookers. Over this arraj of 
useful utensils were hoes, a\es. garden 
rakes and a few other articles 

The modem store is "A horse of anoth- 
er color." instead of a store front of 
small elass and heavy wood sash to shut 
out the light, you ha\e the heavy French 
plate and doors that swing wide on ele- 
gant bronze hinges and shut with locks 



5WHI 




FJO. 4. 

of the same. Floors arc often covered 
with linoleum: ceilings are of -tamped 
steel ; lighted with gas and electricity ; 
healed by furnace or by steam or hot 
water driven by central power, maybe a 
mile away. The old fashioned counters 
are removed ; the stoves and heavy goods 
are moved to the rear: or have a sepal 
ate place. The show cases glisten with 

pearl ami line steel. Cutlery, silver- 

ware, Carving sets, razors, scissors, nickel 

and enameled ware have largely supplant 
ed iron, tin and cheap granite. 

The Cockshutt Plough Co., Brantford, 

Out., have sold a portion of their old 
property adjoining the works of The 
Massey Harris Co., to the latter com- 
pany. They will build a large addition 
to their present plant on the Qewlj ai 
quired land. The Massey llaiii- Co. ai 

now employing 800 men in their Branl 

ford work 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE "SUN" BRAND PORTLAND CEMENT. 

w, maki onlj tuality and thai thi 

Ask us for quotations 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 

,l \s \ i'i.im:. Managing Dlreotor. 



TRADE WITH ENGLAND 



Every Canadian who wishes to trade 
successfully witli the Old Country 
should read 

"Commercial Intelligence" 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., 
London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual 
subscription, including postage, $}.8o.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed 
to advertise without charge in the paper. 
See the rules. 



All proprresatve dealers now 
find It advantageous to stock 

Gilbertson's "COMET" 
Galvanized Sheets and 
Galvanized Canada 

Pl'HlN Quality and price 

W. 6ILBERTS0N & CO , Limited, 
near Swansea Eng. Makers. 

ALEXANDER GIBB, MONTREAL, 

Canadian Represents! 



.Mil .... 



The Ball Check 
Light System. 



MORE LIGHT ! 
LBSS GAS ! 



Best Ball Check Mantle 
Burner, complete with CI f\f\ 
Ball check. .. #I«WU 

.25 



Ball Checks, each 



GAS ARC LAMPS, 

For Indoor and Outdoor Lighting. 

18 Patterns. 7 Styles 
THE TRADE SUPPLIED. 



I.W.MMfill 



26 Toronto Arcade 

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I 



X 



Hardware and 

Met.l 



THE MASTER PLUMBERS OF CANADA. 



Eighth Annual Convention of the National Association of flaster Plumbers, 

of Canada held in Montreal, July i, 2 and .?, 1 



IN the metropolitan citj oi Canada, 
Montreal, situated under the 
shadow of Mount Royal a city 
famed for its magnificent buildings, 
for its beautiful situation, for its 
historic points of interest, its famous 
Victoria! bridge, a oity where one sees 
cathedrals, churches, public buildings, 
warehouses, residences that will compare 
with anj AW aj! in tliis city seven years 
ago that representatives assembled from 
the various ^townsHttS) cities of Canada 
to usher unto, wd&teqpe the National As 
sociation irf Master Plvumbers and Steam 
Fitters of the Dominion, since which time 
conventions have been held annually in 
various cities, and interest has increased 
from time to time in the aims and ob 
jects laid down by the organization. It 
was, therefore, with considerable intere 1 
that the different associations elected 
their representatives to attend the eighth 
annual Convention, which was called to 
meet in the city of the association's 
birth, on July 1. "-' and •'!. 

So great was the desire of some of the 

delegates to he on time that thej arrit 

ed b,s earlv as June 28. From that on 

numbers were added to the delegation. 
The sessions of the convention were held 

in the "Foresters' Hall." 505 Craig 
street. 

THE EXECUTIVE MEETING 

The K \eclltive II tille was called to 

order by the president at HI a.m.. Wed 
nesilay. July I, and entered at once into 
business. After a session of over two 
hours the committee rose to report to 
the convention proper, which was called 
to meet at 8 p.m. that day, 

DELEGATES ENJOY THEMSELVES. 

It was expected that the first 
meeting of the convention would have 
been held on Wednesday afternoon, but 
the Reception Committee had decreed it 
otherwise. The day being Canada's 
National Holiday, it was thought that 
the delegates should join in some of the 
festivities and amusements of the occa 
sion. The Reception Committee present 
ed a complimentary ticket to each of the 

delegates to the championship lacrosse 

match between the "Shamrocks," of 
Montreal, and the "Brantfords," of Brant 
ford, Out. This recreation was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by all, notwithstanding 
the great heat of the (lav and the fact 
that most of the delegates had travelled 
all night. T. O'Connell, the captain of 
the Shamrocks, who is also president of 



I he Mont real \l a tcr I'liiml.. i \ ocia 

iion. was eiveii a warm reception when 
he appearei I on t he field v. 1 1 h hi- team. 

Owing to the cieat crowds out at t lie 

grounds it was late before the city was 

reached, and it was -ecu that the real 
business of the convention would not lie 
reached until the ne\l morning 



Steam and Hot-water Fitters 
oo3. 

Credential Committee. — J. Lamarche, Moat- 
real, chairman II M.ilicnicv. Quelph an.! 
Km Milan, I lalifax, 

Committee on Permanent Secretary.— W. II 
Meredith chairman, R, Ro , J. Lamarche, II 

Million. -v P. C < >e,iK ie. 

i onamittee on Ha ilutions, — J, Mc- 

Kmiev, chairman ; I Thibeault, J. D. Ctntholra 
W Watton 

Committee on Sanitary Resolutions.— H A 

Knox, chairman ; Geo. Kinsman, L, I.eGrow. 




President Joseph Thibeault, Montreal. 



WEDNESDAY EVENING SESSION. 
The fust business meeting of the con 

ventioii proper was called to meet at 8 
p.m., Imt it was fully '.• o'clock I efore 

enough delegates arrived to allow the 

president, Frank Towers, to call tin 

Vention to order. After this was done 
it was thought advisable, after the ap 
pointments of the various committees, to 

adjourn to meet oil the following morn 
ing at '.• o'clock. 

A motion was moved and carried that 
the president do now appoint the special 

committees. The following committees 
were then appointed : 

t.'i 



The meeting then adjourned till a.m. 
Thursday, July ~. 



THURSDAY MORNING SESSION 

After the night's rest the convention 
started business iii earnest, President I 
I'owers in the chair. 

The president requested Mr. d. Gordon, 
of Montreal, to act as sergeant at arms. 

John Date, one of the olde-t and most 

highly respected representatives of the 

Montreal association was present, and 
was asked to take ., -eat at the side of 
the president. 
The first order of business was the re 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ion of tl ntial 

II . ' .on 

1 that, on 
i that the follow 

. 

NK Kinlcy. l ttt.iw.i 

nbui N. S 
Montreal. 

■'., pro tent, Toronto, 
nts — 

treditb, Toronto. 
Thibeault, pro letn, Montreal. 

Kinsman, pro torn, Halifax. 

— W Wat SOU, Monclon. 

• n— I. I). Chishobn, Now Glasgow. 
H. Mahoney, Guelph, Ont. 

— K Ross, pro U'in. Toronto. 
j Provincial Association — 
1. LeGtow, Toronto; George Cooper, Toronto .' 
Fnnk Maxwell. Toronto; Fred Armstrong. 
Toronto ; C, K Pickard. Toronto ; HA Knox. 
Ottawa , |. G. lihnson. Ottawa. 




Vice-President Robert koss, Toronto 

Local Associations. — Urockville, George Ross ; 
Montreal. T. O Co nell. J Gordm, Thos Moll. 
1 Watson; Halifax. | A" Wooten; Fredericton, 
1) Miea . Perth, Ont.. W. G. Butier. 

On motion of W. II. Meredith, seconded 
by II. ttahoney, the report was adopted, 
and the names mentioned above, with 
any others thai might be added during 
the sessions, were declared to properly 
constitute the eighth annual convention 
of the association. 

minutes of the seventh annual con- 
vention having been printed, were taken 
a- read. The preshienl stated thai 
A Perrier, the secretary, would not be 
in attendance at the convention owing to 
1 1 j • - recent death of his mother and the 
illness of his wife; and J. Pascoe Beel 
had been requested to ad rotary 

for the convention. 

On motion the following eommittees 
were appointed : 

Committee on Resolutions. — George A. 
Wooten. R. Ross, J. D. Chisholin. H. Mahoney 
and F. Maxwell. 



Grievance Committee. — H. A. Knox, F. G 
lohnsch \\ Watson, |. Gordon anil Geo. Ross, 

Audit Committee. — i '. 1 Pickard, loronto ; 
1 NU Kinley and J. 1). Chisholm. 

Committee. — |. Thibeault, J. Gordon and 
P C. Ogilvie. 

Railway Kates Committee.— J, 'Thibeault P (' 
t igitvie 



PRESIDENT POWERS' REPORT. 

The next order of business was the 
reading of the officers' reports. Presi 
dent Powers read the following report : 

Ti> the National Association of Master 
Plumbers, .'Steam, Gas and Hot Water 
bitters of Canada : 

Gentlemen ; — At the opening of this, 
our eighth annual convention, i congratu- 
late you upon the large attendance and 
welcome you to the Metropolis of Can- 
ada, the historic city of Montreal, with 
lis niagiiiticent churches and residences, 
pi lncojy; stores and warehouses, and nat 
ural su<l«undings, which are second to 
in /Jnnerii a. 

I trust i bit) your sojourn here will be 

uitVasl well as profitable, but wish 

;>> ouu^fNi note of warning right here. 

As UfT attractions of this city ure many 

'varied, and the business hours of 

ur. tdW'cntion are few, 1 would kindly 
askivion to put business before pleasure 
\i^ enable all to enter more lully into 
whatever enjoyment may be tendered us. 
\ During the past year J have been in 
close touch with the different local as 
sociations, and am happy to state that 
they are all doing well. There has been 
very little, if any, trouble with any of 
the leading supply houses, and the mas- 
ter plumbers, manufacturers and supply 
houses are on the most friendly terms 
and bid fair to continue so. 

The convention of l'JU2, held at Hali- 
fax, has been of incalculable benefit to 
the association in Nova Scotia. Master 
plumbers and others everywhere are mak- 
ing application for membership, and it 
is not a question of "whom we can get," 
but "whom we will take," and it is 
sometimes difficult to draw the line. 

Not only is this the case in Nova 
Scotia, but, 1 am happy to inform you 
that our membership is increasing all 
over the Dominion. 

During my term of office 1 have visited 
many of the plumbers and found them 
verj busy men. Never in the history of 
the plumbing trade have the master 
plumbers of this country enjoyed better 
and more prosperity than they are en- 
joying at the present time. 

I officially visited Sydney, Cape Breton, 
the steel and coal centre of Canada and 
of the world in the near future, (Car- 
negii to the contrary notwithstanding). 
I found the plumbers there busy ; plenty 
of work — in fact more than they can do, 
but complaining of hard times, low prices, 
etc., and willing and ready for anything 
that would better their condition. I 
met with them in the Sydney Motel and 
had the honor of forming "The Sydney 
Association of Master Plumbers, Steam, 
Gas and Hot Water Fitters," consisting 
of fourteen members, and a better con- 
ducted and more enthusiastic meeting it 
has never been my good fortune to at- 
tend. And I wish here to tender my 
sincere thanks for the how ty and frater 
mil manner in which the Sydney master 
plumb, i ■ eceived me. 

Jusf along this line let me call your 
attention to the need of a permanent 
Becretary and organizer who will receive 
such remuneration for his services as will 

46 



enable him to devote his whole time to 
organizing and association business. 

How to provide the necessary funds is a 

question tor your consideration] and 1 
hope you will see your way clear in the 
near future to provide ways and means 
to keep such an official regularly em 
ployed. 1 devoted all the time 1 could 
-par.- to this object, but business, and 
other matters over which I had no con- 
trol, prevented me from attaining the 
success which 1 could have wished. 

The Halifax resolutions have been of 
great assistance to the members, and 
while they do not exactly lill the bill, 
thej lill a lone, felt want. Measures will 
be submitted to you for amending the 
resolutions to better adapt them to the 
needs of the members generally. These, 
I trust, will have your careful considera- 
tion. 

Measures will also be submitted to you 
for the introduction of better sanitary 
laws throughout the Dominion, the need 
of which is felt from one end of the land 
to the other. I sincerely trust that this 
matter also will have your most careful 
consideration, and that you will devise 




Secretary H. A. Knox, Ottawa. 

ways and means to procure the necessary 
legislation. This is a matter of deep 
interest to the general public, and there 
should be no difficulty in establishing 
good sanitary by-laws in the different 
localities. 

1 wish to call your attention to the 
matter of credits. The manufacturers of 
today are. all shortening credits, many of 
them now ask for payment in thirty, days. 
'This is a good thing, providing you are 
able to pay, but, if, as in many cases, 
you sell your customer at three, six, nine 
and twelve months, and you are often 
asked for longer time, how can you meet 
your obligations for wages and materi 
als ? It is impossible for the average 
plumber to do so without serious incon- 
venience, which occasionally ends in linan 
cial embarrassment. To remedy this, I 
ask you to come to some understanding 
whereby the system of credit may be cur- 
tailed to thirty days. 

In the matter of provincial associa- 
tions. Ontario has taken the lead, and 
all honor is due to the master plumbers 
of thai province for the good work the) 
have done and are doing. 1 trust the 



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47 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I t anada w ill BOOD 
w in Out 

urer, 

dents 

will imiit the of tilt" 

thai you will give 

■ uda 

well n^ other import- 

ital interest, must be 

and justice to all. 

In | of the national asBocia 

tion I the members of the 

pai ticulai ly the t rade 

have doin- for our 

•*■ .ilv to thank the 

al, ( ana. la Pacific and other 

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Till- vice-prbsjdbnt's report. 

Vice-President P. C. Ogilvie then read 
liis reporl as follow s : 

To the President, etc. 

itlemen :• A year has passed since I 
ha«l the honor to be elected vice-president 
of this association and in accordance 

with the custom of my predecessors I 

respectfully submit my report for the 
year ending June 30, 1903. 

While I cannot la\ claim to having a< 
complished anything of an) consequence 
during my term of office as vice-prcsi 
dent, I wish to say, that in and about 
Montreal the besl of pood feeling seems 
to exist between manufacturer, jobber 



I do not wish to weary you with a 
length) report, but before I dose I would 
like to sav that I am pleased to see you 
at our eighth annual convention and sin 
cerely ho|>r that your stay in the city of 

Montreal will be a pleasant one and that 
the good results which are usually the 
outcome of our conventions, will lie 
greater this year than ever before unci I 
trust when this convention is over and 
we return to our business worries again, 
that we will feel greatly benefitted by the 
ideas advanced at this convention. 

Vgaui I thank vim gentlemen, for the 
honor v on did me n year ago, in electing 
vice-president of this association. I 

would like to have done much more but 




The Plumbers' Convention — Group of the Delegates. 



reduced rates to the members attending 

tin- convention. 

\- president of the association, I wish 
to heartily thank the members, one and 
all. for their earnest and untiring zeal 
in performing the work of the past vear, 
also our genial and able secretary I 
urer. G. A Perrier, and provincial vice- 
Farquhar, for the kind 
ly and able manner in which they have 
■ • d mi-. I o V r, Pel rier I extend 

my deep sympathy in his recent bereave 
ment in the death of his mother and the 
of his w ife. \ hii h will pre- 
vent bis being in attendance at this con- 
vention. 

Re-ipt ctfully submitted, 

FRANK POWI.i 

President, 



and master plumber ; I have not heard 
of one single complaint. Business has 
very good in Montreal for the year 
just passed and would no doubt be much 
better at present, if it were not for the 
many strikes that we have bad, which 
has tied business up quite a lot this 
year, But on a whole we have not suf- 
fered any more in that respect than other 
cities have. 

T think that in the interest of every 
one. no contractor should make a eon- 
tract with any labor union, until such 
time as thev become incorporated bodies.. 
\s it i- now. a contract i onl; kept un- 
til such time as it suits them best to 
break it ; I sincerely hope that we will 
be able to get some practical sutreestions 
from some of those present at this con- 
on, 

48 



as my term of office has now expired 1 
hope von will excuse me. 
Respectfully submit ted. 

PETEB a (HilLVIE, 

Vice President. 



'The reports of the various provincial 

vice-presidents were next given as below: 

ONTARIO 

To the President, etc. : 

Gentlemen :• While I object to apoio 
gies and excuses, as a rule, I am coin 
pelled in this instance to make an excep- 
tion. Since the organization of the Pro 
vincial Association of Ontario, the office 
of national vice-president for that prov- 
ince, has become, in a large sense, a po- 



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.....iu- that 

_ link between 

. i Iu- National 

i itpei ted that Mi . 

leinan w bo had 

with the presidency oi 

i. would have been 

} ou the report oi 

. l did not have 

a to you in 

! . j ou to excuse 

. presented at 

of the Provincial As 

ion oi Untai io, snouli ad bj 

all. it i^ lull ol good cheer: tehs ol 

_ a it-i days for the 

and is mil of good 

- J has come W hen e\ cry 

must 01 into provincial 

anada is too large to 
the .National Association. 
t in providing the ma 
chinei ganize the provinces. It 

should duty oi the national \ ico 

■ ni- of each of the provinces to 
bring hi- province into line before the 
next convention of the .National Associa- 
tion. Look at Ontario : almost every 
town and city in that province is iu liuc. 
Brantford, Berlin, Barrie, Chatham, 
Guelph, Gait, Hamilton, London, Otta 
wa, Peterboro, Petrolia, tiarnia, Strat- 
ford, St. Catharines, St. Thomas, 
Smith '8 Falls. Toronto, Windsor and 
Woodstock, arc all iu alliliation with the 
Ontario Association. 

The association meets twice a year : 
this i- a great advantage. Jake oue iu- 
stance — Windsor, which had one of the 
and lust locals, for some reason, 
Btruck a rock, on which she split. Be- 
fore the matter got serious, or was al- 
lowed to get cold, the provincial meeting 
took place and the matter was taken up, 
with the result that Windsor is in line 

Pardon me, gentlemen, for seeming to 
make my report so long, but I am so 
convinced that the day and the hour have 
arrived when the provinces must organ- 
that J wish to hold up the good done 
by the Ontario Provincial Association. 
Look at it since it came into existence. 
t not stand to reason that a prov- 
ince can be better worked from within 
than from without ? If we had the 
provii Tanized the question, "How 

can we get all master plumbers in- 
to line '.'" would be solved. Toronto's 
ation for years was a benefit to 
name only. To-day, over 
95 pei cent, of the master plumbers of 
that city are members of its local. 

ntlemen, let me thank 
you for the honoi you conferred upon me. 
at the last & on, in electing me 

vice-president for Ontario. 1 have 
occupied a position on your executive 
board for the past five years, and now 
lay down the tools to let someone else 
wipe the joints of confidence and good 
feeling between the master plumbers of 
our Dominion. 

t fully submitted, 
W. H. MEBEDH II. 
Vice-president for Ontario. 



NOVA SCOTIA. 

To the President, etc. : 

Gentlemen \ vice-president of the 

Vaster Plumbers' Association of Nova 

1 submit my report for 

ear ending June 30, 1903. 

I am pleased to report the past year 

to be up to the general average, and we 



look forward to a brighl future, as the 
small towns are falling into line and 
adopting sanitary plumbing. This is 
something our associatian feels proud to 
report. 

The formation of branch associations 
has been started throughout the province, 
Mr. Frank Powers, your president, has 
been successful iii forming Sydney, Glace 

Bay and North Sydney into a separate 

ation, having their own executive, 
carrying on their own business, and, at 
the same time. brinuiiiL:' them closer to- 
gether: working up a much better feel 

ing, and takine that general coldness off 

that is usually found to exist among all 
professions. 

1 have every confidence in the associa- 
tion, as the} are made up of good, hon- 
material. Personally, I have found it 
difficult and not at all practicable to 
visit the various cities and towns of the 
province; but I am pleased to state we 
are represented in nearly every section. 

In conclusion 1 am pleased to state 
that the association of Halifax and 
vicinity is in a flourishing condition. 
Our meetings are held regularly and are 
well attended. and we find the supply 




Past President Frank Powers. 

houses and their representatives living up 
to the interests of the trade in general, 
and the best of feeling prevails through- 
out. The Board of Health of the city of 
Halifax are very strict, and the associa- 
tion assist them greatly in observing 
their rules and regulations, thereby gain- 
ing their respect and the confidence of 
the general public. 

Much regretting my inability to be 
present at the annual meeting of the 
association, I am, gentlemen, 
Yours very truly, 

JAMES FARQUHAR, 
Vice-president for Nova Scotia. 



KKIT1SH COLUMI1IA. 

To the President, etc. : ■ 

Gentlemen : — As provincial vice-president 
of the Province of British Columbia, I 
beg to submit my report, which, I regret, 
is not as favorable as I had hoped it 
would be. 

At the l>eL'innii)L r of the year T corres- 
ponded with 11 different firms through- 
out the province, soliciting a speedy re- 
ply. 

50 



\ ictoria has reorganized a local as*o 
ciation within the year, with Mr. J. J. 

Coughlan as secretary, and, in corres 

pondence, seems desirous of affiliating 

with the National Association, but, al 
though I have sent copies of by laws and 
given information and encouragement as 
far as I was able, they still are a little 
doubtful as to benefits derived therefrom, 
Vancouver scut an encouraging reply, 
that after receiving m,\ letter, the} had 
formed a local association, with ,1. Hair, 

president, and K. C. Bodgson, secretary, 
and have since written, asking for further 
information regarding the National, as 
to benefits, cost, etc. 1 replied and seal 
reports to then. also. 

Replies from Rossland, Nelson, New 
Westminster and Grand Porks are favor 
able to provincial organization. Their 
grievance is that journeymen plumbers 
travelling from place to place do the 
work, while the owners buy the material 
direct from the wholesale house. 

1 am satisfied that if Victoria or Van- 
couver were to become members of the 
National Association and take up the 
work of forming provincial associations, 
they would soon be repaid for their 
trouble^ in the benefits they would re- 
ceive ; the wholesale houses would soon 
find out that it would be to their inter- 
est to protect the master plumbers by 
dealing with 'legitimate master plumbers 
only. They would be able, by being 
thoroughly organized, to get better 
prices, and do away with the practice of 
doing work for almost nothing, as has 
been the custom in the past. If they 

could only feel the good work that the 
Ontario Association is doing, they 
would become organized at once. 

In conclusion, Jet me say, that with the 
strong foundation laid by the popular 
past provincial vice-president, Mr. ■) . H. 
Wilson, and the corner stone which I 
have tried to lay to the best of my 
ability, I sincerely trust that the gentle- 
man you elect to this office will com- 
plete the building during the coming year. 

Below is a list of nearly all the promi- 
nent plumbers in British Columbia : 

M. Drummond, Ashcroft ; Jas. Munroe, ChM- 
liwack ; Geo. Chappl-*, Grand Forks ; Tilslet & 
"ishop, Greenwood; Bailey Bros., Nanaimo ; 
Corbeit & Co., and W. E. Vanstone, New West- 
minister ; Hebner & Hebner, and Strachan Bros., 
Nelson; McLean & Conw ,y, Phoenix ; A. S. 
Hunden, H. F. Burch, and G. M. Weller, Ross, 
land ; Trail Hardware & Plumbinsj Co., Trail ; 
M. S. Rose, W. A. Brown, Otto Laursen, J. G. 
Mortimore, W. Leek, Barr & Anderson, Peach & 
Hodgson, Jas. Hughes, Chas. Peters, Burkholder 
& Green, and Weeks & Son, Vancouver ; CM. 
Coikson, J. H. Warner & Co., Watson & Mc- 
Gregor, A. and W. Wilson, Jno. F. Bmden, City 
Plumbing Co., Jno. Colbert, Clayton & Costin, 
Clark & Pearson, E. F. Gei^er, Hickman-Ty<", 
Hardware Co., J. T. Orr and A. Sheret, Victoria ; 
E. Moscrop,.Revelstoke. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY MAHONEY, 
Prov. Vice-Pres., B. C. 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

To the President, etc. : 

Gentlemen : — Having had the honor of 
being appointed vice-president of the 
Province of New Brunswick at the last 
annual convention, held at Halifax, NI. 
S .. L902, f had great confidence in being 
aide to help to organize a provincial as- 
sociation of the master plumbers before 
this, our annual convention of 1903. 

I regret much not having met with the 
success expected. Business has been so 
exceedingly good this last year all 



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52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



master |. lumbers cannot spare time for 
organising purposes. So many of the 
master plumbers seem anxious i<> bave a 
provincial association formed ;ui<l Btil] il 
seems impossible to get enough members 
together to organize. I had thought to 
find tune to take a trip through the 
province and see if a personal canvass 
would in >t have the desired effect t<> get 
tin- master plumbers together to organ 
i/.e. Owing ti> unavoidable circuwsta 
i was prevented from doing so. Seeing 

this is the only province in the Dominion 

without a provincial master plumbers' 
association, it seems to me, Mr. La 

marehe's suggestion at the last annual 

meeting, that an organizer should be ap 
pointed, would till the bill as far as New 
Brunswick is concerned, as there is such 
a distance to travel to get from one citj 
or town to the other, and as St. John 
city seems to have nearly as man\ 
ter plumbers as all the other cities and 
towns combined in our province our mas 
ter plumbers seem to have a much more 
friendly feeling for each other than was 
the custom years ago. I believe the an- 
nual report and the trade papers deserve 




Joseph Lamarche, Montreal, Vice-President 
/or Quebec. 

credit for this feeling of good will to- 
wards members of our craft. 

Trusting my successor, the next provin 
i ial vice-president for New Brunswick, 
will iie able to show a thoroughly organ 
ized /master plumbers' association at the 
convention of 1904, 1 am. 

Yours respectfully, 

\VM. WATSON, 
Vice-president for New Brunswick. 



A RETORT FROM MONTREAL 

T. O'Oonnell, president of the Montreal 
association, presented a report for that 
organization, the only one in Quebec 

province, as follows : 

To the President, etc. 

Gentlemen r- I have great pleasure in 
presenting the eighth annual report of the 
Montreal Association, and in so doing 
must allude 10 the satisfaction of our 
Montreal memibei at your last meeting 
at Halifax, and the good treatment thej 
received from our friends in the " Marine 
Province." 

Ih. Montreal Association has met with 



a reasonable amount of ucceBu during the 
past year. I must here allude to the 
good feeling which exist- between the 

Master I'lumlieis' Association and -lour 

nej ii. I ,ocal Ml. I must also tati 

that, owing to this good feeling we had 
no strike in Montreal this year, and we 

cXpecl b\ the first "I \ul"I-I that Olll 

membership will increase up in the hand 

reds. 

Our plumbing by law has been amended 
and in some points will prove very bene 
Gcial anil I might here --talc that OU1 
journeymen have to undergo an exaiiiinn 
tion before practical men, which In the 
past was an unknown thing in this city. 

Our relations with our friends, the 
wholesale* dealers and manufacturers, are 

pleasant and cordial, lint there are still 
certain matters in which a more loyal 
adherence to agreements bj both the mas 
ter plumbers and dealers would be mu 
tuallv beneficial. 

The whole respectfully submitted, 

T. O'CONNELL, 

President of Montreal Association 



SECRETARY PKRKlKR's REPORT. 

The report of Secrctai y G. \ Perrier, 
Halifax, was presented, and in his all 
sence, read by Secretary J. Pascoe Beel, 

as helow : 

To the President, etc. 

Gentlemen : It i< with feelings of deep 
est regret that I cannot, owing to a 
death in my family, be with you at the 
convention, to be held at Montreal, 
July I. 

I keenly feel the position I hold in 
relation to the association. The position 
of secretary is. without doubt, a respons 
ilile one, which should make it more 
binding for me to he present, but ils I 
have asked my friend, Mr. d . Pascoe 
Beel, to act for me, and as he is well 
acquainted with the affairs of the associ 
ation, there is not the least doubt that 
he will till the position so efficiently that 
my absence will not he felt. I am send 
inc. books and correspondence up to dale. 
and I do not think you will have much 
difficulty in understanding them. 

The duties I have pei-formed as secrc 
tary for the association the last year 
have been a source of pleasure to me. 
Perhaps I have not answered some letters 

as promptly as I should have wished. If 
there is any complaint for neglect on 
account of delay, I would ask you to 
take into consideration that my business 
often calls me from the city, and there- 
Fore ttfV'Was not through wilful neglect. 

During the year I have written 123 
letters, and I do not know of any com- 
munication that I have wilfully neglected. 

There were live meetings of the Execu 
tive held in Halifax during' the year, and 
some very important business was trans- 
acted. Great credit is due our president, 
Mr. Frank Powers, for his attendance at 
the meetings, when you take into con 
sideration that he resides 100 miles from 
Halifax, and on each occasion he was 
compelled to leave his business and at 
tend the meeting, where, by his wise and 
efficient guidance, lie assisted greatly in 
solving some very knotty questions. 

i would suggest, if possible, a paid 
secretary, to reside more centrally, where 
he would he in a position to more fully 
grasp the affairs of the association. 

In conclusion I might say I had an 

interview with our president before leav- 
ing for the convention, and with him 

53 



went through my work for the i 
and there i- not the least doubt he will 
be in a position to answei an\ que lion 
I ertaining to my w oi b 

Re pei tfullj ulimit ted, 
'.I '< \ PERRII i; 
. Sei 



APPRENTICESHIP COMMI1 rEE'H REPOR1 

I he report of the Vpprenl ice. hip ( Ion 



was next read by I 'hail man II \ 
Knox, as follows : 

To the President . etc. 

< lent lemen : Youi Vpprent ici hip < lorn 
inittee beg to report, that though this 

ubjei i i not directly dealt with, it 
t he iii mo t imp, ,i i ance to tie 
t ion. The chai actei ol oui a ocia 

in the future depend* on the character i.i 

the apprentice of to day In some locali 
ties the question is rather acute, as the 
labor . irganizat i< ms inchi ate a desire to 

thin their ranks and thus check the up 
ply of help. I his i- not in the n < . 

of any community. It therefore follows 

that where the eve of the master plumbei 




Harry Mahoney, Guelph Vice-Presif'ent 
for Ontario. 

must seek for help, there, also, should he 

apply his authority, and insist on the 
number of apprentices he thinks lit to 



•mploy. 



Yours respectfully, 
B. A. KNOX 
J VMES I.K\ OCK. 
P. d. HOIS. 
F. •/. JOHNSON. 
K. B. I'd TTERWORI H 



sanitary committee's rep >rt 
The report of the Sanitary Committee 
was then read by Chairman d. W 
Hughes as follows : 
To the President, etc. : 
Gentlemen > Your Sanitary Committee 
have pleu-ute in reporting a com 
increase in the public interest regarding 
sanitarv matter-. The pulpit, the press 
and platform continue the good work, 
and the members of our association and 
craft are by voice, pen and practice con- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Lhe important 
■ i i . ■ i » of tuberculo 
iken u j> in earnest, 
now iii the hands 
look with 
suits in the abate 
that has been truth- 
White Man's Plague," 
1 by the highest 
nutli ontagious ami pre- 

i . aa it may 
. up to date, not re- 

nth the attention from 
Banitariai allpoi (not nearly so 

alent), 1 

D iiinion are slowly 
I good sani- 
ially bearing 
upon our calling Montreal has been ac- 
i during the past yeai 
old by-law has been revised and 
and brought to date, the Bpe 
cially no\el feature being the practical 
and theoretical examination of the jour 
are coming forward in 
numbers and proving themselves 
lent. This action cannot but re 
suit in much good to the men. the mas 
and, above all. to the general pub- 
lie. Some opposition was met with in 
thi- Council, the Legislature, and from 
both and men. but that has now 

nearly all disappeared, and it is realized 
that such legislation is not intended as 
an interference with trade, but as a pro- 
tection to the general public. 

Public sanitation during the past year 
sustained a great loss in the death of 
the late Mr. Wyatt Johnston, of McGill 
College, Professor of Hygiene. He was 
fine of the heroes of peace, having fallen 
a victim to one of the many accidents to 
which men in his profession are at all 
times liable. His position is now held 
by Dr. Starkey. who is an enthusiastic 
sanitarian, and in a short time McGill 
will have a sanitary museum, covering 
the departments of food, clothing, lierb" 1 
dwelling, nlumbing and sanitary appara- 
tus, worthy of that great institution of 
learning. 

In conclusion your committee would 

upon our members to continue the 

good work and do all in their power to 

elevate bur important and responsible 

callii .cure in that way the de- 

I appreciation of the o-eneral public 

J. W. HUGHES, 

Chairman. 
TnOMAS MOLL. 
T. O'OONNELL. 

On motion the reports were received 
and referred to the Committee on Reso- 
lution--, with the exception of those 
clauses in the presidents' reports, which 
had been referred to the other commit- 

While the Committee on Resolutions 
were preparing a report the president 
called attention to an ait which had 
enacted and placed in force in tin- 
State of New York in reference to 
awarding of government and municipal 
contracts, a copy of which, as n 
to be a bill for presentation to the Do- 
minion Government, was read to the 
convention as follows : 

l ill-: -i GGE01 BO PLUMBING .\< i . 

Tim people of the Dominion of Canada 
represented, do enact as follow 



Section I. All specifications or con. 

tracts hereafter made or awarded by the 

Dominion, or In an\ public department 

or official thereof, for the erection and 

construction of buildings, shall be under 
stood to eiiilu. . and mason work, 

carpenter work, painting and decorating 
work, plumbing, heating, electrical work, 
structural iron work, and rooting. 

ion -. lhe officer, board or com- 
mission charged with the duty of draw 
ing specifications and contracts for the 
erection and construction of buildings for 
the Dominion, or any political or other 
sub division of the Dominion, must draw 
separate specifications and contracts to 
Cover the separate kinds of work referred 
to in Section 1 of this act, and they 
must be so drawn as to permit of unfet- 
tered bidding for and upon the separate 
I 'ranches of work to be performed. 

Section 3. All contracts hereafter made 
or awarded by the Dominion, or public 
department or official thereof, for the 
erection and construction of buildings, 
arc lo lie awarded separately upon the 




Wm. Watson, Moncton, Vice-President 
for New Brunswick. 



separate branches of work, as referred 
to in Section 1 of this act, to responsible 
and reliable individuals, firms and cor- 
porations engaged in the business of the 
kind to which the work to be performed 
belongs. 

Section 4. No bid shall be received or 
accepted by the Dominion or any public 
department or official thereof, unless the 
party making the bid show's by affidavit 
that he is a citizen of the Dominion of 
Canada, and as a test of his fitness to 
properly perform the work bid for, that 
he has served an apprenticeship of at 
hast three years at the line of work 
specified in his bid, or that he is a con- 
tractor in the particular line, and has 
had at least five years' practical experi- 
ence. 

Section 5. If any person, firm or cor- 
poration, to whom any contract is here- 
after let, granted or awarded, by the 
Dominion or by any public department 
or official thereof, shall, without the pre- 
vious written consent specified in Section 
5 of this act, assign, transfer, sublet, or 
otherwise dispose of the same, or any 
right, title or interest therein, to any 

:,4 



other person, firm or corporation, the 
Dominion, public department or official 
thereof, as the ease may be, shall In- re 
lieved and discharged from any and all 
liability and obligations growing out of 
said contract, and to the persons, linn, 
or corporation to whom he shall assign, 
transfer, or sublet, or otherwise dispose 
of any right, title or interest in the 
same, and said contractor, and his as- 
signee, transferee, or sub-lessee shall for- 
feit and lose all moneys theretofore 
earned tinder said contract, except so 
much as may be required, to pay his 
employes, provided that nothing herein 
contained shall be construed to hinder. 
prevent or afTeet an assignment by such 
contractor for the benefit of his credi 
tors, made pursuant to the Statutes of 
the Dominion. 
Section 6. All acts and parts of acts 
with this act are hereby 



inconsistent 

repealed. 

Section 7. 

immediately. 



This act shall take effect 



The president requested that a commit- 
tee be appointed to proceed to Ottawa 
at once, to endeavor to have the Domin 
ion Government place such a law on the 
statute books of the Dominion of Canada. 
The president said that it would be a 
good thing to have it adopted by the 
Dominion Government. It was a mea- 
sure which had nothing to do with either 
political party. The ultimate benefit of 
the passage of such a bill would be far 
reaching, and would do away with a lot 
of unnecessary competition, and would 
place the representatives of the different 
works in their proper position. 

Mr. Thibeault was in thorough accord 
with the president, though he doubted, 
owing to the shortness of time, whether 
anything could - be done this session. 

Mr. McKinley was also in sympathy 
with the measure, but thought it was 
not necessary to endeavor to have the 
bill passed by the House ; that a request 
to the Minister of Public Works, that the 
principles of the measure be carried out 
by his department, would be all that was 
required. 

The president stated that there were 
other spending departments besides that 
of Public Works in which the bill should 
be operated. 

Mr. Cooper : — "Why not see members of 
all the Governments ; both Dominion and 
Provincial ? The Dominion Government 
Act would not have any control over 
Provincial Government works or muni 
eipal works." He thought that each 

Provincial Government and municipal 
corporation should be interviewed. He 
would suggest that the delegates see 
their members of Parliament, aldermen, 
and any men of influence, and so work 
the inteiests tip in favor of the act, that 
it would more easily become law. 

Mr. McKinley : — I agree with this, but 
the trouble was mainly with the Domin 
ion Government. 

W. H. Meredith was in favor of a depu 
tat ion goiri£_ r to Ottawa, but feared it 



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com 
He I" 
■ igrht direction, an I 
ted thai a committee composed 

oJ p n sident '' ■ - ,,lrnl 

amarche inter 
,,.1 report back t<> 

the 

to the com 

onvention next 

settled at 

\|, >„. B supported the president's con 
aid thai any action should 
from this convention. 

Mi M lull I would not wish t<> tie 

of the committee. We have 
...... i„ the committee sug 

and if thej Bee anj possubihtj of 
the hill passed at tin- ses 
onvention, i an. BUre, would give 
tli. 'in full power t<> act. 

The motion was finally made that the 
committee named interview tin- Minister 
of Public Works ami the Ministers of all 
spending departments, requesting that 
they comply with the principles of such 
a measure ; ami that the committee haw 
power to get the Government to |a<- 
such a measure this session, if possible, 
and to report tie result to the Execu 
live Committee, who would have power 
to further instruct. 

\ . uvular letter, issued bj the inanu 
facturers ol -oil pipe ami fittings, notify 
he trade that on ami after January 
I. 1904, they would discontinue the sale 
of light soil pipe ami fittings, was read. 
an 1. f >ii motion, the action of the manu- 
facturers »was endorsed, ami the circular 
letter ordered to' be printed in the report 
.if the convention. 

Mr Hahoney raised the question of why 
jo few ladies accompanied the delegates 
t,> the convention, ami thought in future 
that the" Reception Committee, in ar 
ng their programme of entertain 
ment, should consider the ladies, and 
that tin- delegates be requested to have 
their wives and daughters accompany 
tli. in t<> the convention. This was con 
sidered a very good idea and was unani 
mously concurred in. 

Mi Lamarche here intimated that the 
mayor of tin- city would be very phased 
to receive the delegates in his office in 
the City Hall the following day at 12 
o'clock. Arrangements were made to 
take a photograph of the delegates and 
their friend- immediately afterward-, (in 
motion. the invitation was accepted. 
This brought to a close the morning 
•>n of the convention. 

THURSDAY AFTERNOON SESSION 

The president took the chair at - 

o'clock. The minutes of the morning 

,n were read and adopted. Mr. 

i - announced that he had received a 



telegram from the president of tin- Vi 
tional association of Master Plumbei 

of the I nited Stale-, which read a- Pol 
low s : 

To 1 lie National Plumbers'Association ol Canada ; 

llie .National Association of Master Plumb) i - 
of the lulled States extend greetings lo the Cana- 
ili.ui Master I', umbers' Association and wish yon a 
harmonious convention and every success in ad- 
vancing trade interests' Signed, 

!•'. I). HORNBROOK, President 

This was read amidst enthusiasm, and 
the president w a- requested to reply on 
behalf of the convention in session. 

The committee appointed on Halifax 
Resolutions reported that t lux would 

not recommend any amendments to the 

resolutions this year, and that further 
action should lie deferred until the nexl 
convention. The committee's report was. 
on motion, adopted. 
The Committee on Resolutions brought 

in their report, which was taken up. 

clause by clause. The committee recoui 

mended the adoption of the president's 
report. which was carried ; also the 
adoption of the vice president 's report. 




Geo. Kinsman. Vice-President f > r 
Nova Scotia. 

excepting clause I. which was amended 
to read. " that it lie a recommendation 

from the National Association, that any 
agreement which local associations may 
make with the journeymen, should lie 

ratified by the International Association 

of Journeyman Plumbers." The commit 
tee recommended the adoption of the re- 
ports of the other officers as read 

The committee appointed to consider 
the question of a permanent secretary 
and organizer reported that they had 
met ami fully considered the question, 
and had found that the state of the 
funds did not. at present, warrant such 
an appointment, lint that $150 he set 
apart to pay such person as would as- 
sume office a- secretary and correspond 
ing organizer. 
The committee also recommended an in 
• iti the per capita to the National 
Association, therebj increasing the reve 

inn- and thus enabling the National offi 

to more efficiently carry on the work 
56 



«>f organization. After considerable dis- 
cussion the report of the committee was 
adopted. 

Mr. Mckinley suggested that something 

should lie done to bring this association 
into correspondence with the National 
Association of Master Plumbers of the 
United States, believing that it would he 
in the interests of both associations to 

have closer relationships the one with the 
other. 

Mr. Mahonej : T am of the opinion 

that the association should send a dele 

gate to the next .convention of the Na 
tional Association of the United States. 

which is to he held in St. Louis in 

1904." 

Considerable discussion took place 
along this line and a motion was finally 
adopted that the matter he referred to 

the Executive Committee with instruc 
lions to place themselves in cbmnmnica 
tion with the president of the National 
Association of the United States, ascer 
tabling if it will meet the approval of 
their association for a representative to 
lie sent fror.i our association to place the 
matter before their convention, and if 
they would reciprocate bj sending a re- 
presentative to the next meeting of our 
National Association. 

The selection of the next place of meet 
iny was then taken up. \V. H. Meredith, 
on behalf of the Toronto Master Plumb 
ers' Association, extended an imitation 
for the convention to meet in Toronto in 
1904, ami stated that his city would do 
all in their power to make the conven 
tion both pleasant and profitable. 

George Koss. on behalf of the city of 
Brockville, extended an invitation to tin 
convention to hold its next session in 
that city. 

Mr. LeG.row :— While I would like to 
sec the convention held in the city of 
Toronto. 1 think it is advisable to move 
it from place to place. a ml probably some 
other city is more entitled to it than 
Toronto. However, if it i^ the wish of 
the convention to meet in 'Toronto tn • \ t 
year I can assure them a hearty wel 

collie. 

No further nominations being made the 

president put the city of Brockville be 
for.' the meeting, which was not sustain 
I'd. 'The president then requested till who 

wen' in favor of the city of 'Toronto as 

the next place of meeting, to stand up. 
which was carried by a large majority. 

The question as to the date of the con 
ventibn was taken up. It had been the 
custom for the Executive Committee to 
decide on the time of meeting, 'This was 
.thought unwise, and the convention 
should select the date. After consider 
able discussion it was decided that the 
Convention should be held in the city of 

'Toronto, commencing on Wednesday, July 
20, 1904. 
On motion, the president appointed a 



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of >\ 

M \|. reditl . I . Kin-man, II. A Knov. 

I that Cape 
■ u had formed a local association, 

.in nil the Vi 
■.n. .11. the follow bag telegram 

n. nation :— . 

fou hearty Knenngs - lml 
- jnert, 

KKANK POWKItS. 

mention then adjourned till Fri- 
day mon 

FRIDAY MORNING SESSION. 

idi m took t !>«• chair ami rail 
ed'the meeting to order at 9 a.m. I he 
minutes of the Thursday evening session 
were read ami adopted. Host of the 
business of the morning's session was 
taken up in the discussion of the Griev- 
ance Committee's report, hut nothing of 
interest for publication took place. 

CONFB8BNCH WITH SI 1'IM.V HOUSES 

At 10.30 a.m. a number of gentlemen 
representing the manufacturers and sup 
ply men arrived to keep a pre arranged 
appointment to discuss jointly matti 
interest to them ami the association. 
These gentlemen were introduced by 11. 
of Toronto, who j>erformed that 
office in liis usual happy style. The 
president welcomed them and said that 
it ha«l been a -our..- of great pleasure to 
him to h.ok forward to this meeting, a 
meeting which, he trusted, would result 
in mutual benefit. ^.mong those present 

were : 

Ale*. I'renner, The Fairbanks Co., Momreal. 
H. McLaren, P. J. Lockhart and J. K. L. 
Carson. The Gurney - Massey Co., Limited, 
Montreal 

Peter McMichael, The Dominion Radiator Co.. 
Limited, Toronto. 

P. E. Rouillier and John Carlind, The Star Iron 
Co., Limited, Montreal. 

F. J. Travers. The Canada Radiator Co., 
Limited, Port Hope, Ont. 

James Robertson and Mr. Mackenzie, The 
Thos. Robertson Co., Limited. Montreal. 

\V. P. Baxter. The F. W. Webb Co., Montreal 

W. N. Forbes, Wm. Stair, Son & Morrow 
Limited. Halifax. N.S. 

The desirability of their organizing an 
iation for the Dominion of the manu- 
facturers and supply men was urged on 
these gentlemen. It was stated that 

while the master plumbers wen- becoming 
thoroughly organized into local and pro 
vincial associations and were also form J 
e.l into a Dominion Association ; that it 
rather inconvenient to meet the 
manufacturers ami supply men to adjust 
any misunderstandings which might 
arise! or to discuss matter- of mutual 
benefit. There was no fountain hea<l 

through uhi.h communications could he 
-.nt. 

A very interesting discussion ensued 
along this line, al-o on other trade 
tope The master plumbers claimed 

that they were not given the full pro 
tection to which they were erflitled. All 
the representatives present wen- calle 



upon to express their \iews on the mat 
ter and all agreed that the plumher was 
entitled to consideration, and that in the 

cities where the local associations were 

in thorough organization they were ex 
tending the fullest protection and con- 
sideration. They' also stated that they 

did not always receive the consideration 
to which they Were entitled. Some 
tunes local associations came to them to 
L'ct help and considerations, when possi- 
ble they would he bettering their condi- 
tion by looking more after local organi- 
zation. It would appear that just si) 
soon as the association was in a position 
to offer an equivalent, they were in a po- 
sition to meet thelll. 

The various speakers spoke of the 
need of more frequent meetings. It was 
only w lien conventions were in session 




F.J. Travers, Port Hope, Pi esidenl of The Canada 
Radiator Company, Limited 

that meetings were arranged and this, 
they thought, was not in the best inter- 
est of the trade. 

After the various speakers had express- 
ed themselves, the president asked W. 
H. Meredith to reply. In response Mr. 
Meredith stated that he felt a little diffi- 
dence at replying, and thought that there 
were others who could deal with the sub- 
ject better than he. However, he would 
express a few thoughts. He stated that 
the masters' association must remember 
that, in dealing with the manufacturers 
and supply men, they were dealing with 
business men, men who eould look at all 
propositions from a business point of 
view. These gentlemen were in business 
to benefit themselves, and there was no 
question that any proposition brought be- 
fore them must have power behind it. 
•lust as soon as these o,ntlemcn could be 
brought to see that the Master PlTunb- 
V.SSOciation was a power, they would 
the more readily listen to just demands. 

58 



He would urge the manufacturers to or 

ganize and do all they could to assist 
the master plumbers and litters In the 
Dominion into closer relationship. There 

was no question that the manufacturers 

and the supply men Were a powerful fac- 
tor to assist in accomplishing this. He 
thought the subject was too far reaching 
to allow a conclusion to be reached in so 

large a body and agreed with the repre 
Bentatives present that meetings should 
take place oftener. To this end he had 
much pleasure in moving that a commit 
tee of three, T. Powers, .1. Lamarche and 
P. C. Ggilvie, arrange to meet the manu 
facturers and supply men on the follow- 
ing morning, to endeavor to form an us 
sociation and to talk over the Halifax 
resolutions. This motion was adopted. 
The conference was admitted by all to 
have been one of the best ever held be- 
tween the representatives of the supply 
men and the masters, and that many 
minor difficulties would soon be satisfac- 
torily arranged. 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON SESSION. 

Before the session on Friday evening the 
delegates were given a reception at the 
office of Mayor Cochrane, who extended a 
warm welcome to them. In his speech he 
emphasized strongly the importance of 
the plumbing profession to any communi 
ty. President Powers, on behalf of the 
association, accepted the good wishes of 
the Mayor and thanked His Worship for 
his words of welcome. He also assured 
His Worship that the pleasure of the 
delegates was being fully looked after. 
Before returning to the convention rooms 
the delegates were shown through the 
city hall, in the rear of which they as 
sembled and "had their picture taken," 
a copy of which photograph is herewith 
shown. 

At two o'clock the session was called 
to order, the delegates determined to 
finish the business before adjournment. 
The election of officers was at once pro- 
ceeded with. The Nominating Committee 
submitted the name of President Frank 
Powers for re-election, and on his refusal 
to accept, nominated Joseph Thibeault, 
Montreal. The retiring vice-president, 
P. C. Ogilvie, had signified his intention 
not to accept the office, so Mr. Thibeault 
was unanimously elected. 

The election of officers resulted as fol- 
lows : 

President — foseph Thibeault, Montreal 

Vice-President — Robert Ross, Toronto. 

Secretary — H. A. Knox, Ottawa. 

Treasurer — F. G. Johnson, Ottawa. 
Provincial Vice-Presidents — 

British Columbia — John McKinley, Ottawa. 

Manitoba — A. J. Hammond, Winnipeg. 

Ontario — H. Mahoney, Guelph. 

Quebec — Joseph Lamarche, Montreal. 

New Brunswick — W. Watson, Monclon. 

Nova Scotia — Geo. Kinsman, Halifax. 
Chairmen Standing Committees — 

Legislation — E. B. Butterworth, Ottawa. 

Apprenticeship — G. A. Perrier, Halifax. 

Sanitary — James H ghes. Montreal. 

Essay — John Watson, Montreal. 



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C. A. Parent, Quebec. J. L. Wells & Co., Winnipeg. 

The Victoria Machinery Depot Co., Victoria, B.C. 



59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



\\ 11 Mi rcdith of the Nom 

troduced President 
bis appre- 
onfej red <>n him by 

nmed their po 
introduced bj Jos. 
. \\ II. Meredith, 
president, Frank 
Faithful work performed 
in during thi In responding, 

Mi \\-w in- appreciation of 

he had done his duties with 
■ ai nesl ness and it 
satisfaction to have the 
vvill i.f thi' association expressed in 
\ resolution thanking 
ithei retiring officers for their work, 
wav W, II Meredith, who 

had foi two years filled the office of 
one year thai of president and 
the lasl year a- vice-president for On 
tan. i. tonk the opportunity of saying 
ell to the association, owing to his 
having retired from the business. He 
wished the organization increasing sue 
cess and asked for loyal support to tli«' 
utive Committee. 
Tin' Audit Committee presented their 
report which showed that after all re 
ceipts ami disbursements had been taken 
into account, the Mar closed with a bal 
am i- of $148.28 in the treasury. 

After votes of thanks had been passed 
i., the press, t<> the Montreal Associa 
tu.h and to the manufacturers and sup 
ply men, the eighth annual convention ol 
the Master Plumbers' Association passed 
into hi-torv. The delegates joined heart 
iK in singing "Auld I. ant: Syne," and 
'■( !od a&\ e the King." 

THE BANQUET. 

One of the most attractive features of 
the annual conventions of the associ- 
ation is the banquet. The function, 
which was held on Thursday evening 
in the Windsor Hotel, was no ex 
caption to the rule. The tables were in 
the shape of a horseshoe and were pro 
fusel} decorated with cut Bowers About 
ninet) guests were gathered around them 
when Past President Joseph Lamarche, 
who ably filled tin- chair, took his seat. 
Among those noticed were: L. Payette, 
of Warden Kini'. Son c.V Co.; P. J. 
Lockart, J. II. L. ('anon, of The Gurney 
. ( '<>.; W . M. Lecoui -. of Amiot, 
rs >v Lariviere ; Peter McMichael and 
II McLaren, of The Dominion Radiator 
Wex. Bobertson and W. Greig, of 
I in- -la- Bobertson Oo.; F. J. Travers, 
I Hurtubise and Geo. E. Griffith, of 
The Canada Radiator Co.; P. E. Rouil 
h'-i and J. Carlind, of The Star Iron Co.; 
\\. B. Baxter and J. Terry, of F. W. Webb 
\l. P. Shea and A. W. Bremner, of 
! airbanks Co."; B. B. Brewer, of The 
I ho- Bobertson Co.; Geo I I Iriffith, J. 
S. Archibald, I ^rn tronj Geo. Coop 



rr. K Boss, J. l.amairhr. .1 Gordon, F. 
Powers, Geo. Kinsman. \\ V Forbes, I). 
J. Shea, I Legrow, P. C. Ogilvie, duo. 
Date, II. \. Knox, I' G Johnson] Jno. 
McKinley, II. Mahoney, Geo. Boss, W. 
Maxwell, T. Christy and others. 

Tin' chairman was supported bj P 
dent Frank Powers and on his left by I 
S Archibald, vice-president of the Quebec 
Architects' Association. It will I" 
I'rom the menu that the guests were 
properly looked after. 

MINI 

Little Neck Clams 

Russian Canape olives Radishes 

Mock Turtle Amontillado 

Bailed British Columbia Salmon, Sauce Hollandaise 

Sliced Cucumbers Pommes Persillade 

Sweetbread Pate, Hortensia 

Stuffed Spring Lamb Chop, Mclba 




|ohn McKinley, Ottawa, a popular Past President. 

New Stiing Beans Bermuda Potato, Brown 

Kirsch Punch 

Broiled Philadelphia Squab au Cresson 

Baked Cauliflower 

Heart of Lettuce with Tomato, French Dressing 

Assorted Cakes Fresh Strawlx rry Jelly 

Almond Ice Cream 
Cheese Crackers Fruits Coffee. 

Alter all had fully enjoyed the good 
things set before them, the chairman 
called for order, and on rising expressed 
In- great regret at the unavoidable ab- 
sence of Thomas O'Connell, president of 
the Montreal Association. However, he 

was glad to see that the I,,- 1 of feeling 
prevailed, and extended a hearts welcome 
to the city of Montreal. He. with pleas 
ure, asked them to join him in the toast 
to •II,. Majesty King Edward VII." 
This was responded to heartily while all 
60 



joined in sineine "Cod save our King." 
The chairman then called upon P. C. 

Ogilvie to propose the toast of "The 
National Association." Mr. Ogilvie said 
it gave him great pleasure to propose the 
toast. Montreal was the birth-place of 

the National and this was the third time 
the organization had honored the city 
bj holding their convention within her 
gates. He hoped that ere lone/ an op 
portunity would Be given whereby thej 
would again lie able to extend their hos 
pitalitv. In asking them to join in this 
toast he wished long life lo the associa 
t ion. 

President Powers, whose name had Been 
coupled with the toast, on rising to res 

pond, was greeted with enthusiasm. He 

thanked the gentlemen present for the 
hearty manner in which they had received 
the toast and thought that it denoted 
the unity that now existed among thein. 

Behold how good a thing it is, 

And how becoming well, 
Together such as Brdthers are 

In unity to dwell. 

This unity is a good thine, he continu 
imI, and should Be practised as much as 

possible, for the closer you come together 

iii your relations with each other and the 

.manufacturers and jobbers, the more 

likely v on are to derive greater benefits 
from the Business you do. Only a few 
years ago if competing- plumbers were By 
chance to meet on the street, one would 
skip to the other side to avoid meeting. 
Thanks to 01 uani/aj^^l Bh was now 
changed. ''48 ^Jwent on to 

say that it wu.sl V'" a master 

pllimliei I allT^H ^^Tie "wonderful 

protection all'ordcd him in his Business 
dealing with the manufacturer" unless he 
lends his support to the organization 
that protects him. The mere payment of 
dues was not enough; each member 
should give of his time and Brains to the 
up building of their Breastwork of safetv 
and prolit. The speaker believed that 
the master plumber had Been the means 
of bringing about the present state of 
affairs. He, it was, who had organized, 
who had introduced sanitary laws, edu 
bated die public in sanitary science, >-re 
ated a demand for the goods. Turning 
to the manufacturers and supply men 
present. Mi', rowers asked. "What have 
vein done in return ?" Have you an or- 
ganization to whom the master plumber 
< an come with his troubles ? If not, 
gentlemen, it is up to you to organize at 

an early date." 

I;. Boss, president of the Toronto \ 
sociation proposed the toast to the 
"Montreal Association." In a few words 
Mr. Boss wished the local association 
every success, and urged unity as the 
foundation stone. Joseph l.aurier, of 

Montreal, thanked them for their words 

of good wishes. As a young master 
plumber he admired the aims and objects 
of the association. 
, Mr. Lamarche, the chairman, added a 

few words. He thanked them for the 
hearty manner in which they had receive,! 
the toast. The plumBers of Montreal 

wen- not satisfied in a local association ; 







While the Wrench shown above will 

do any and all work any other 

Wrench can be made to do 

IT WILL DO 

the following things no other Wrench 
can be made to do. 

1. It will take up the slack i>erfectly. 

2. It will gHp and release instantly. 
:;. its self-adjustin;; overhead. 

I. Its parallel jaws and never slip grip glTe vuu B 

vice. 
i We will guarantee Our Wrench to do as much 

work in 8 hours as any oilier can do in 10 
hours. 

6. This Wrench is as useful to ;i machinist as B 

plumber. 

7. Space will not permit further description, which, 

if desired, will be cheerfully given bj ad 
dressing 

THE INVENTOR, 



C. L. HENDERSON 

Berlin, Canada. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EVERYTHING IN 





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TORONTO 

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jobbers at all points from St. John, N.B., to Vancouver, B C 



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have everpul out. Winn you rtnd imr name, irhich appear* plainly stamped 

on ill "t make, ii is ■ guarsnti e thai the Hop la Ittari with a full wi ighl 

Cloth, one that is sufficiently " stockey to be of practical luu W 



supply on inferioi Mop Cloth al -l 50 li thail our regular standard 

Cloth ;bul we do not \M> WILL MOT St oui Hopi with them 
Hop took for the makei ■ name 



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Trade 






Cost 


1 









O.PICARD& KII>S 

Pr.OMniKHS. KA7.IKHN. KKKIII. wriKKS ft 1 ..I 

rorKNAMs a aik <mv< ... * BAD I a hODB m A VAPKl'H 



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y» Veej»Cl^e«JCt »«l r err* idl N - , .. m j, 

hut a coup! 

Youra truly, 

n, Plrwi t Fit.. 1 ;. 
f.r 



Mom ai w.. Hay 1. 1903. 
Brod ■• \ I -i t i tri i .. 

3AHATOOA >l'l IHOS, 
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In answer to your enquiry of '27th 
nil . "Hv Steam and Ga Pittera Price 
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til 



S tional 

The \'.< afi was 

I and bo have been all bud- 

>n\ entions 

• i of the 

of the supply 

I i the nm<' 

reap the bene- 

ister plumb- 

mtleman. It 

Hi- i- onlv ;\ plumber." 

arche thought the 

nil to do with the 

- the doctor. 

\\ II Meredith, in proposing the toast 

said this toast inelud- 

manufacturer, the architect and 

•i "We us.- the goods made 

l>v the manufacturers. We make healthy 

- designed by the 

architect, and we endeavor to deal fairly 

with tin- man who has done tlic work." 

Mr Meredith read telegrams from H. W. 

Inthes, of The Toronto Foundry Co., 

am) \. Bet ton. of The Jas. Morrison Co., 

Toronto, regretting their inability to be 

present . 

\ft.-r the toast had been drunk J, S. 
Archibald, viiv president of the Quebec 
u ion of architects, was the first to 
He expressed his regret that the 
lent of their association was not 
present to*respond. He extended the 
hearty felicitations of liis association to 
the master plumbers' association ; and 
tulated them on th(> scope of 
their work. In looking over the eonsti 
tntion one could not but be struck with 
the onoortunities there of doinp good. 
In conclusion he thanked them for the 
eourtesv shown him. 
Mr. Howard, president of the journey- 
iciation, was the next to res- 
pond. Tic felt that his presence was an 
indication of the good feeling existing be- 
tween Local til and the master plumb- 

F. J. Travers, of The Canada Radia- 
tor Cn.. Port Hope. Out., said : They 
would not "it much of a speech from 
him : In- believed more in work. How- 
ever, in a very concise way Mr. Travers 
showed he knew how- to make a soeech. 
It was thing to dwell together in 

unity. Tt was a good thing also to 

ther oftener and discuss ways 
an<l means for the advancement of each 
other's interest. The sneaker went on 

to tell of the great possibilities of this 
Canada of ours. 

Peter McMichael, of The Dominion 
Radiator Co., Toronto, on rising- was 
greeted with a warm reception. After 
pxpressinp his pleasure at being present, 
he referred to the unity spoken of. He 
did not think that heretofore there exist- 
ed the same harmony and good feeling as 
now existed. Thanks to organization 
little differences are passing awav. 
The gentlemen present, knowing Mr. Mc- 
Michael's vocal capabilities, would not 
permit of him resuming his ceat before 
favoring them with a soi Mr. Mc- 

Michael good naturedly responded, and 
rendered in "(rood style a song which car- 
ried the whole audience with him. 

S. R. Brewer, of The Thos. Robertson 
Co.. Montreal, said if the master plumb- 
ers carried out the laws of the National 
iation constitution it would make 
the work of the Bupply men very easy. 

\. |) KacArthur, Toronto, of The s 
dard Idea! tated that public speak 

as not in his line ; selling goods 
Tf what followed was a sample of 
what he stated he could not do. he must 
be a hustler at selling good-. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



J. P. L. Canon, ^PThe Curnev Masscy 
Co.. Montreal, thought that the remarks 
made by Mr. Archibald, the representa 
tive of the architects' association, were 
along the right direction It would he 
beneficial for the plumber to deal with 
the architect instead of through general 
contractors. 

Uex. Robertson, of The -lames Robert 
son Co . Toronto, thought that the mas 
ter plumbers of Canada would compare 
favorahly with any class of men ; they 

were a good lot of fellows. 

Captain (liroux favored the company 

with a rousing French song. 

I red. Armstrong. Toronto, proposed the 
toast of "The Ladies." It is sullicient 

to sav that Mr. Armstrong proposed this 



Congratulations, ('apt. O'Connell ! You 
led your boys to victory. The same de- 
termination will put your association in 
good condition. 

Old members who arc not on the Exe 
cutive this year are: .las. Farquhar, 
Halifax : G. A. IVrrier. Halifax j W. H. 
Meredith. Toronto, and 1'. C. Ogilvie, 
Montreal. 

New members of the executive are : Ceo. 
Kinsman. Halifax ; H. A. Knox, Otta 
»a : F, (!. Johnson, Ottawa; Joseph 
Thibeault, Montreal : of these Messrs. 
Knox and Tliiheault were former mem 
bers, 

The manufacturers and supply men rea 
li/e that they can very materially assist 



J 




Peter McMichael, Toronto, Manager of The Dominion Radiator Company, Limited, 



toast. All who know him* know that 
full justice was done to it. Harry Ma- 
honey, of Guelph, replied in his usual 
happy style. The toast of "The Press," 
brought a very successful banquet to a 
close. 



NOTES OF THE CONVENTION 

New Brunswick, wake up ! Do you 
know Nova Scotia is fully organized. 

The two "Papas." Forbes, of Halifax, 
and Ross, () f Toronto, had their own time, 
looking after their contingent. 

"Harry" said that "Louis" was too 
long in bis berth to be straight. "T.onis" 
maintained the berth was too short. 

62 



*^ 



the association in complete organization. 
They are also getting to realize that it 
is in their own interest to aid. Great 
things will soon be accomplished. 

British Columbia, why don't you or- 
ganize ? Good things were said of you. 
You eeem ready to fall into line. Why 
don't you get together ? Read well the 
report of the late convention. It is 
only by unity that your evils can be 
met. 

P. E. Rouillier, secretary of the General 
Arrangement Committee, deserves great 
credit for the faithful way he performed 
the duties of that position. Mr. Rouil- 
lier was ably assisted by R. J. Lockart ; 
together they looked well after the com- 
fort and entertainment of the delegates. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



STEVENS MANEG. CO. 



/Manufacturers of 



— London, Ont. 



BRASS GOODS, SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS , 
AND PLUMBING SUPPLIES OF ALL KINDS. 

The "LoDdon" Low-Tank Combination 







If 



We are the sole owners and manufacturers of this combination, and make all 
our Woodwork, which is the best put together and finest finished on the mar- 
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you get the 

"LONDON." 



63 



H«rHw»re and 

Mnal 




SUPPLY MEN TO ORGANIZF. 



t CORDING to arrangement, a meet 

Y ing ti>.'k place at the office of The 

Cai Co., Craig Btrei t. 

Montreal, Saturday morning last, be- 

d the manufacturers and supply men 

and a committee appointed at the Friday 

m of tli"' National Association of 

Master Plumbers, consisting of President 

rhiheault, Past Presideni Powers 

and Secretary H. A. Knox. The follow 

ing gentlemen were present : 

1, Payetle, representing Warden King; Son S 

K. I Travers. of The Canada Radiator Co., 
Hector MeKen/ie and Alex. Robertson, of The 
lames Robertson Co. 

P. E. Roui lier, of The Star Iron Co. 
R. J. 1 ockhart. of The Gurney-Massey Co. 
W . H I onnell, of H . R . I ves & ( 'o. 
W. P. Baxter, of F. W. Webb & Co. 

lb,- object of the meeting was the con 
iideration of the formation of an associa- 
tion of the manufacturers and supply 
, ,,,,,,. |, has been fell for a long time 
that a great deal of good that might be 
don.- by the National Association of Mas 
• ., plumbers could not be done owing to 
the fact that representatives of the manu- 
facturers and supply men had to be in- 
terviewed individually. This it was 
claimed was not in the best interest of 
either partii Mter discussing the 

question it was finally decided to organ 
Jas. Robertson acted as chairman 
of the meeting, while P. E. Rouillier per 
formed the duties of secretary. 



WINNIPEG PLUMBERS AGREE 

THE threatened dispute between 
master plumbers and the plumbers 
union has been practically settled. 
I i„. men and their employers have been 
working on a new agreement for a few 
weeks and the announcement is now made 
that a basis of agreement has been ar- 
rived at. The rate of wages -hall be 50 
per hour, second class men to rate 
from 25 cents upwards; second ctw 
who have been employed in this city for 
the past year to get not less than pres- 
ent rate of wages, Nine hour-: to consti 
tutc a day's work. Overtime shall count 
a- time and a quarter up to 10 p.m., 
after 10 p.m. time and a half. Sunday 

and Labor Day double time. Fii I class 
steam fitters -hall lie allowed only two 
helpers. The apprentice system shall be 



governed by joint meeting of the masters 

and the union. \\ innipeg \ I »i( e 



BASEBALL AT WOODBINE 

The baseball team of the Blaster Plumb- 
ers of Toronto and their friends jour- 
neyed down to the Woodbine on Satur- 
day afternoon last to meet a team of the 
manufacturers. It was somewhat of a 
juvenile proposition they struck, that is, 
considering the age of the plumbers' 
team. However, a fine game was played 
and everybody had a good time. At the 
conclusion of the sixth innings the score 
stood 13 to 6, in favor of the manufac 
turers. It was here that a change in 
the team took place, with the result that 
at the end of the ninth innings W. Cop 
pine-, of the Inspection Department, who 
umpired the game, declared it a draw, 
t he score being : 

Manufacturers — i, 2, 2. I, I, 6 5, o, o — 18. 
Mast r Plumbers— o, 2, o, I, 1, 2, 2, 4, 6 — 18. 

It looked like a sure victory for the 
plumbers, they had a man on third and 
one on second base, with two men out, 
when a very clever play by Fred Sommer- 
ville put the last man out on second 
base. A feature of the game was the 
home run of Adams', of the plumbers' 
team. Bill Adams, of course, saved 
Waterloo, but it was the plumbers' Dill 
Adams that saved defeat at the Wood 
bine. T6-day the journeymen meet the 
bosses, when, it is expected a good game 

will be put Up. ^S 

- o 

DOES NOT DETERIORATE WITH USE 



acting as a cushion to the bibb washer, 

the effect of Which is to give more elas 
ticitj to the spindle in the aid of clos 
ing. Mam of these stop cocks have been 
in service for two or three years and 
stop the flow as completely and evenly 
as when they were installed. 



th 



PI. I MBERS have so much troll 
stop cocks. which. afte 
year or so, become s 
with the result t/tyit there 

3ak. frorrj them, th 



BUILDING PERMITS. 
TORON in. 

F. IV Poucher, two pair dwellings, west 
side Elowland avenue, near Victor, to 
cost 85,000; Geo. Harper, architect. 

Dr. J. B. Fraser, brick dwelling, south 
side of Queen, near Broadview avenue, to 
cost 15, : C. F. Wagner, architect. 

Robertson Bros., five storey brick and 
stone factory, 103 and L05 Queen east, 

to cost !<7,. r )b0. 

C. Bulley, brick dwelling, Hi Withrow 

avenue, to cost $2,200. 

Win. E. Weale. dwelling, corner Blooi 

and Russett, to cost 81,500. 

W. N. McEachern, residence. 37 Lenty 
avenue, to cost $1,500. 

•J. •). Fraser, pair dwellings, 106 and 
108 Albany avenue, to cost 83.000. 

A. Nicholson, dwelling. II Concord ave 
nue. to cost $1,300.' 

■las. McDonald, pair dwellings, 234 and 
236 St. Claren's avenue, to cost 85,000. 

J. F. Ellis, addition to dwelling, Rl 
Wellesley street, to cost $1,200; Symons 
& Kae. architects. 

Robert Laicflaw, dwelling, 32 North 
Sherbourne street, to cost $7,000 ; W. 
and W. Stewart, architects. 



HAMILTON. 




surprising they have appreciated the 
good qualities of the Morrison Patent 
Stop Cock, which is constructed with a 
spindle and holder containing a soft rub 
ber disc and a brass washer between this 
anil the bibb washer. In closing, the 

rubbei disc cannot spread laterally, 

held by the walls of the holder ; 
hence the pressure must be outward, thus 

C4 



John W. Coffee, for brick house on 
Smith avenue, between Cannon and Bar- 
htinuallt^ ton streets, to cost 81.300. 
it is XppK Charles Milne, a new house at the cor- 
ner of Victoria avenue and Bobert strept, 
Ato cost 82,100. 
^ mV. B. Rodgers, residence at the cornpr 
. O 'if Victoria avenue and Evans street, to 
\ cost $900. 

BRANTFORD. 
George Howell, brick residence, on Fair 

avenue, $1,250. 

John W. Aiken, brick dwelling. Dnfferin 
street, $700. 

Mrs. Agnes Whitaker. brick house, Park 
avenue. $2,800. 

Mrs. Lina Torry, brick house, on Sheri 
dan street. $1,900. 

George Jennings, brick dwelling, EagL 
avenue, si .250. 

OTTAWA. 

• I. G. Park, solid brick dwelling, Som- 
erset street, *l,000. 

• fames Moore, solid brick dwelling, 
Bomersel street. $1,000. 

Fred Rowe, brick veneered dwelling, 
Rochester street, $1,500. 

R. A. Baldwin, brick veneered dwelling. 
Lome avenue, si. 000. 

J. C. Chamberlain, three brick veneered 
houses and store, Somerset street, 83,- 
500. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



VARNISH 
REMOVER 
PAINT 
REMOVER 



A Painter Will Pay 

a price for what will save him time— don't you 
think so ? He buys a gallon of Varn-Off for 
$3 oo and that gives you a nice profit ; with 
it he will take off more varnish from any 
surface in two hours than he could rub off or 
scrape off by the old way in two days — that's 
business isn't it ? 

Send for sample 

VARN-OFF 

and try it yourself. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



We sell 

Pig Iron. 
Ingot Tin. 
Ingot Copper. 
Zinc Spelter. 
Pig Lead. 
Babbit Metals. 
Solder. 
Cotton Waste. 



We buy 



Scrap Rubber 



of ill kinds. 



— Rubber Boots and Shoes. 
— Rubber Bicycle Tires. 

Rubber Carriage Tires. 
— Rubber Hose. 
— Rubber Springs. 



We buy We buy 



DrOSSeS of all kinds. 

— Tin, 

— Lead, 

— Type Metal, 

— Zinc 

Brass Ashes. 
Metal Residues. 



Scrap Metal 



—Iron, 
Copper, 
Brass, 
Zinc, 
Lead. 



FRANKEL BROTHERS, 



MONTREAL, 

92-98 Wellington St. 



TORONTO, 

116-120 George St 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 




and Fittings . 

Fire Brick and Ground Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, Portland Cement. 

ASK FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 

TORONTO POTTERY CO. 

TORONTO, ONT. 

Exclusive Sales Agents. 



The New Century Bail-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 

k<H0U5£H<> LD 
FavoR |T[6 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tnbfal. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, 



L.mlted. 
Eastern Agents. 



65 



Htrdwtr* tnd 
M»t«l 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



HENDERSON'S PERFEOT WRENCH 
the convention at 
Montreal last weak wei much in- 

ted in a nevi wrench that was shown 

derson, oi Berlin, Out., the 

atures that will teoom- 

mend the wrench are the instantaneous 

and perfect manner in which it takes up 

slack, the self-adjustment on over- 
head «oik. also the fact that the wrench 
cm be U I he-e features 

will make this wrench a valuable tool, 
not onl\ for the plumber, but for the 
machinist. Mr. Henderson, the inventor, 

practical machinist and knows full 
well the requirements of the trade. 

PRESIDENT ELECT JOSEPH THI- 
BEAULT. 

It will be of interest to the craft to 
knew something of the man who is now 
at the head of the National association. 
Joseph Thibeault was borne at St. Rose, 
La,val Counts. Que., in the year l v -~> v . 
In l^'iT his family removed to Montreal 
and he was placed at the Christian 
Brothers' College. Vfler acquiring the 
education necessary for the struggle with 
life, he started as a plumber's appren- 
tire. II i- perseverance and energy led 
him to success. At the age of twenty he 
opened a shop on St. Paul street, .Mont 
rial. and to day is at the head of a 
flourishing business situated at 410 St. 
•lame.- street, and prosperity has reward- 
ed his early labor. 

President Thibeault has always taken a 
keen interest in the cause of mutuality ; 
he is an old member of the following mu- 
tual St. Joseph, St. Peter, 
I nited Workmen and the Travellers' As- 
sociation. At the convention held in 
Hay L899, the delegates and Executive 
Board elected .Mr. Thibeault as general 
president of La Societe des Artisans 
Canadiens Francais. 

Mis colleagues knew his devotion to the 
mutual societies and under his leadership 
the number of members have greatly in- 
creased. In a word, President Thibeault 
is a self made man and as such he de- 
Bervee the admiration of his brother 
craftsmen and hi- fellow citizens. 

CANADA RADIATORS. 

Tin' Canada Radiator Co., new located 
in Port Hope. (int.. have made wonder- 
ful strides in the ra'i- for public patron- 
Tbis companj has now been in 
busini years. During that time, 

short though it may lie, they have ad- 
vanced to such an extent that they are 
now one of the leading companies in their 
line in Canada. 

Their radiator, which is patented, is 

claimed to have perfect circulation. It 

is so constructed that the same radiator 

■ oiks in both steam and water, and 

'In- -team and water must travel the 



length of each lo..|. before entering the 

next Thus in a -team radiator there 

are no pockets in which the ail 
and prevent free circulation of steam. In 
a hot water radiator there is no mixing 
of the hot and 'old water. The cold re- 
turns to the boiler and forces the hot 
through the radiator, thus more heat is 
taken out of it. and a more rapid circu- 
lation obtained. 
'This companj have now agencies in all 

the leading centres throughout Canada, 
and they claim the time is not far dis 
tanf when the 'Canada" will be the 
standard of excellence of radiators. There 
i- every probability that this company 
will have a radiator plant installed in 
the vicinity of Montreal this Fall. 

THE BALL CHECK LIGHT COMPANY 

The Ball Check Light Co.. New York, 

have crossed the border. 'Their reprc 
sentative in Canada, \Y. W. Mitchell, is 
planning a widespread educational and 
business campaign in the matter of better 
light. Demonstrations are given to any 
interested at the company's office, 2(5 
Toronto Arcade, Toronto. "Hardware 
and Metal" was present at one of the 
demonstrations and can testify to the 
success of the ball check idea, which is 
applicable to either mantle burners or 
open Same. The feature of the device is 
a ball, or small globe, which spreads the 
gas low down in the burner, and provides 
for a perfect mixture of gas and air. 

Some burners fail in making the pres- 
sure of flame uniform and of sufficient 
height to produce a light of even quality, 
resulting in broken and blackened man- 
tles. The ball check can be quickly at- 
tached to any burner. The company are 
also dealers in arc lamps for store light- 
ing. Their lamps are likely to prove 
very popular. The commercial value of 
good light is, we are glad to say, coming 
to be appreciated by merchants every- 
where. The arc lamps are fitted with an 
attachment that by a slight pull shuts 
off the gas with the exception of a tiny 
light. A second pull serves to turn on 
full and ignite the gas at the same mo- 
ment. A good deal more might be said 
concerning the Ball Check Light, but 
"Hardware and Metal" serves its purpose 
in acquainting the trade with a device of 
which many merchants will be glad to 
learn. 



THE ROCHESTER LAMP COMPANY 

Tie- Rochester Tamp Co., 24 Front 
street west. Toronto, look forward to the 

'■'all trade with a e.ood deal of confidence. 

The Rochester lamps are so widely known 
and enjoy such a good name that there is 
reason for thinking tin- coming season 
will be the li.-t on.- -o far experienced. 
fitters and dealers handling gas fix 
6« 



tares may not know that 'The Rochester 
Lamp Co. handle a goodly range of 

plumbers' supplies as these pertain to gas 
lieditiiiM mantles. gas hose. etc. 'This 

company are also agents in this district 
for the "Yotto" 'jas arc lamps, and the 

"Yotto" burner "Yotto" is a synonym, 

lor the best there is in gas lamp and 
burner const ruction. 'The "Yotto" burn- 
ei can be applied to any incandescent 
lamp, and is designed to greatly improve 

the qualitj of liLdit, by providing a bet 

ter mixed and better distributed gas. 'The 
"Needle Valve" will commend itself as a 
simple, yet effective, device for improving 
the quality of light. 

BUILDING NOTES. 

Building trade is brisk in Orillia, Out. 
It is expected that the wharf will be 
completed ill si\ weeks. 'The crib work 

is now complete. 

Extensive improvements are being made 
in Thos. T'ennelTs implement warehouse 
on Proton street, Dundalk, Out. 

'The building trade in Vancouver, Q.C., 
has been exceptionally good this season, 
the permits granted for the first six 
months of the year amounting to more 
than $100,000 per month. It is there- 
fore to In- regretted that the refusal of 
the mill men to supply lumber to the 
local trade until the mill factory hands 
return to work may interrupt building 
operations. 'The Builders' Exchange has 
endorsed the action of the n.illmen. 

Permits for 15 new buildings, repre- 
senting an outlay of $318,314, were issued 
in Montreal during June. Permits for re- 
pairs to buildings during the same month 
represented an outlay of $49,820. 

A $2;000 residence is to be erected on 
Macnah street, Hamilton, by E. B. Pat- 
terson. 

Hamilton building permits for June 
amounted to $65,000, an increase of $8, 
075 over the corresponding month of last 
v car. 

Tlie strike of the sash and door makers 
of Montreal has failed. The masters 

have granted nothing. 

A new theatre with seating capacity of 
1,300 is to be built this season ill Syd- 
ney. M.S. Saxe & Archibald are draw- 
ing the plans. 

The G.T.R. intend building new sta 
tions at Milton and Whitby, (int. Exca 
\,iiion win- commenced at, Whitby on 
li in ion Day. 

K. Reiss has received a permit to build 
a brick building on York street, llaniil 
ton. to cost $1,200. 

\i 1 : 1 1 i at ion proceedings have been ill 

progress between the Carpenters' Union 
and the Master Builders' Association of 
Halifax. V S. Skilled mechanics are to 
receive an increase and foremen are to 

decide as to ability of employes! 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THe Man wHo Pays I 

for tKe Coal 



i 

♦ 

I 

I 
x 




is the man who buys the furnace. He wants a house-warmer, not 
a coal-eater ; so he is going to study the matter very thoroughly 
before he decides. When he comes to investigate the merits of the 

Oxford Hot Water Heater 

we give him every assistance. Newspapers and magazines keep 
telling him the different points in which the Oxford excels all 
other heaters on the market. Our profusely illustrated booklets 
complete the sale. So the sale is really made when the prospec- 
tive customer comes to you that is, if you can supply him with 
the Oxford Hot Water Heater. 



♦ 

: 

♦ 

♦ 

: 

* 
■f 



s 

t 



+ 
X 



THE 



GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., n 



mited 



WINNIPEG, 
INI GURNEY-HASSEY CO., Limited, 



TORONTO, CANADA, 



VANCOUVER. 



*++H++++++ ++++++++++++++^+<H~H~H++<H+-++~ 



MONTREAL. 



KITCHEN RANGE BOILERS 

" A|jOllO " Galvanized 

Made of " Apollo' open-hearth steel 

Severely tested at 200 lbs. before galvanizing (making 
tightness doubly sure) and are perfectly galvanized 
inside and out. 



25, 30, 35, 40, 52 gallons 

Quotations on application 




The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited, Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON OUTLOOK PROMISING 

Pi;i i| I SSOR B I • Miller, prov incial 
,. Toronto 
v\!iat extended 
tion through northwestern 
He i. |>oi ts that the iron out 
s now very prom 
is no doubt that there aw 
■ ■ (western Ontario 
similar to thu have proved so 

Mi. bigan and Minneso 
pie, the Temagaini range 
similar to the \ • • 
,1 \| inm sota. Many ranges are, 
,i slightlj prospected because ol 
lequate transportation fa 
,iln I In- lark is hindering o] i 

amagaini range at present . 
but n i- expected thai the new railway 
i,, be built to the northeast arm this 
Kail \\ ill remove i li«- difficulty. 
Work is progressing satisfactorily in 
iron properties east and weal oi 
Port Arthur. Six diamond drills are 
now in operation. There is some activi 
tv in the two ran-'- along the rout.- of 
anadian Northern, but that road is 
l.usv with other traffic and hence ran af 
ford to be independent toward the min- 
ing industry. 

\t ili«- famous Helen Mine at Michipi 
coten, ore is being shipped from the low- 
er levels. Mr. Clergue's company is said 
to have mined 355,000 tons there last year 
and altogether it is estimated that they 
have taken S00,000 tons of iron ore from 
that mine. Mr. J. W. Wells, late pro- 
vincial assayer, is in charge of the 
laboratory and sorting plant at the 
Helen. 

The Loon Lake Iron Co.; recently incor- 
porated with 83,000,000 capital, are oper- 
ating 25 miles north of Sault Ste Marie. 
along the Vlgoma Central, on what was 
formerly the Breitung Mine. 

GASOLINE ENGINES FOR 
THRESHERS. 

r V y III'. McLachlan Gasoline Engine Co., 
Limited, ~<\ Queen street west, 
Toronto, aie making an engine of 
unique type. The distinguishing features 
are the sparking device, the vaporizing 
valves and the double cylinders working 
on the same crank, completely overconi 

lie vibrati m i to many types 

of engines. The consumption of gasoline 
i- less than one pint per hour per 
horse power. 

The Mi l.ai hlan engine has been manu 
Eactured for tin past four years. In this 

tine- ii liai n subjected t<> te i- of all 

..ii-. the purpose being to have it 

absolutely proven before the public 

should he asked to buy it. For two 

it has lii-en on the market, ami lia- 

never failed to vindicate it- claim It 

interest ing i liiiiL- 1 1 1 reci ir<l t ha1 t he 
i i mi- ever built in 



Canada for marine use is a McLachlan. 
\ populai use to which tin- engine has 
Keen put is for threshing, and the mar 
ket has lieen our great Northwest Kn 
gines lor this purpose an- made from 'Jo 
Ii. 'in lip., and aii- to lie had mounted. 

portable or traction. Prices range for 
s„eh engines tr |900 to $1,600. 




Gasoline engines for threshers' outfits 
are an interesting industrial development. 

The .McLachlan engine is made as low 
as }, h.p. and up to III h.p., and is cer- 
tain to have a large sale among users ol 
power, for every purpose where motive 
power of limited capacity is sufficient. 

.). C. McLachlan is known east and 
west. An electric motor of his manufac- 
ture, had a very wide popularity, over 
1,400 of them being sold in Toronto 
alone. Mr. McLachlan is president, and 
W. Galbraith, recently of Belleville, is 
secretary and business manager of The 
McLachlan Gasoline Engine Co., Limited. 



ATKINS COMPANY AGAIN EXPAND 

Tllh] saw manufacturing firm of K. C. 
Atkins iv; Co.. Incorporated, of 
Indianapolis, Indiana, has been 
making rapid strides during the past ten 



years, their business having grown to 

immense proportions in all parts of the 
world, necessitating the establishing of 
branch houses and salesrooms, not only 
in their own country, but in Canada and 
other foreign countries. 

This wonderful growth has been fol- 
lowed by a corresponding increase in the 
capacity of their great plant, and. during 

the past four years they have' added 
several new and extensive buildings, such 
as their woodworking factory, hand -aw 

building, gas works, .-tr. 

lint the continued great demand for the 
saws and tools bearing the Atkins brand 
has rendered even these many improve- 
ments inadequate for their requirements, 
and they were confronted with the prob- 
lem of moving away from tlu-ir present 
location or acquiring a larger amount of 
land adjoining, in order to properly care 

for their rapidly increasing trade. 

Thus was necessitated the most impor- 
tant step this firm has taken for several 
years. They have just purchased the en 
tin- plant occupied by The Parry Manu- 
facturing Co.. tlie largest buggy manu 
racturing concern in the world, employ 

iiiL! over 1,500 men. This property joins 
the factory on the south, and consists of 
several large, well arranged brick build- 
ings, besides several of small size, which 
can readily be made suitable for their 
needs. 

The magnitude of the Atkins plant 

when the propeety just acquired is fitted 

up can easily be judged when the fact is 
made known that the entire works now 
cover about three blocks. and most of 
this space is solidly built up with three, 
four and live storey brick buildings. 

E. C. Atkins & Co. have branch 
houses at \ru STork city. Memphis,- Tenn., 
Atlanta. Ga., Minneapolis, Minn., and 
Portland. Ore., besides sales offices in 
Chicago, 111. "St. Louis, Mo., Toronto. 
Can., London, Eng., Melbourne. Alls., 
Capetown. S. A.. Paris, France, and 
elsewhere. 



David Kemp, painter, Hamilton, is 

deceased. 



WHY WOOD'S 
PATENT-PLANISHED 

sheet iron drove Russia out of the 
market — 800 packs were imported 
last year. 

It was a trifle handsomer. 

It was a trifle cheaper. 

Made in various and more econom- 
ical sizes. 

( die was about as good as the other 
in other respects. 

Return a whole sheet for an inch 
of fault. 

Quick service. 

American Sheet Steel Company 
Battery Park New York 



68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

If you want to sell a FIRST-CLASS RAZOR, concaved by the best grinders 

in the world, 




H. Boker & Co.'s "ROYAL CANADIAN 



n 



is the thing. No line will give you better satisfaction. 

CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Inly 1U, 1903. 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities its are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large oash buyers can fre 
quenUy make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor ia anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this lisi, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 
Lamb and Blag and Straits— 

tnd '-'8-H'. ingots, 100 lb. *33 oo *34 oo 

TlM'I.ATF.s 

i harcoal Plates -bright. 

M.L.S., equal to Bradley — Per box. 

I C, usual sizes $6 75 

IX " 8 25 

I X X " 9 75' 

Fatuous, equal io Bradley— 

I 8 ' 5 

IX 8 2:. 

I X X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

It', usual sizes 5 00 

IX " 6 00 

IXX " 7 00 

I X X X " 8 00 

DC, 121x17 4 50 

I) X 5 25 

DXX 600 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14\20 4 00 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 50 

20x28 'J 00 

Chareoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. Q. Gradi — 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Chareoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs I 

" 14x60, " Y . .. 7 00 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 

r - 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 ll> 2 05 

Refined " " 9 15 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, 1J to 3-in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

T talk steel 2 85 3 00 

T.Firth&Oo.'B tool steel, per lb 13) 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Morton stool steel 121 13 

Blaek Diamond and "B.C.'' 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel. . . . 08 09 

Park's "Silver" tool steel... 12 14 

" " Special' 15 20 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel .... 10 20 

"Air Hardening ... 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

BOILER Tl'BES. Per foot 

Jin 09 

2 in 101 11 

21 in 0«13 131 

3in 141 15 

3Jin 17 174 

4 in 34 35 



STEEL BOILER PLATE. 



316 in 

; in. and thicker. 



9 50 9 60 

2 60 9 7u 
2 50 2 60 



BLACK SHEETS. c 1 1 II 

10 and 12 gauge 2 66 2 75 

18 gauge 2 sr> 3 oo 

20 " 2 85 3 00 

22 to 24 gauge 2 95 3 25 

26 " 3 05 3 50 

28 3 15 

COPPER Willi. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 3 00 

Half-polished 3 00 3 10 

All bright 3 75 3 85 



IRON PIPE 



Blaek 



pipe 
inch 



Per loo 
3 00 
2 30 



1 " 

II " :::::::: 

2 " 

21 " 

3 " 

3) " 

4 " 

44 " 

5 " 

6 " 

Galvanized pipe— 

i inch 



feet. 

3 25 

9 in 

2 65 

3 65 
5 20 

7 35 

8 95 
12 55 
21 00 
25 00 
32 00 
38 50 
45 00 
48 00 
63 00 



3 20 
3 45 
3 85 
.. mi 
7 20 
io 05 
12 20 
16 85 



Malleatile Fittings Discount 15 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings - 

On unions, 55 per cent. ; on nipples, 60per 
L'i'iit.; on all others, 50 per cent. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 
G.O. Gomel Bell. Head 



IIS gauge 

18 to 24 gauge 

26 

28 



4 05 3 75 3 75 
4 25 4 IK) 3 90 
I 50 l 25 l 06 



American brands, $i tO for 28 gauge. 

Less than rase lots 111 to 15c. extra. 



4 06 
4 25 

4 .50 



CHAIN 

oof eoil, 5-16 in., per 100 lb, 
} " .. 

516 
"8 " • 

7-16 



7 85 

4 50 

4 25 
4 20 
I 05 

I INI 

4 00 



8 10 
5 SO 

4 re 

4 50 
4 50 

I SO 
4 50 
4 .50 



Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
.", ]irr cent. 

I OW ties 40 p e 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures . 35 p.c 

Trace chain I 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 



( OPPEB 

Ingot. 



Per 



Casting 

L luperior. 



Cut lengths, round, 

round and square, 
1 to 2 inches. . . . 



23 00 



Sheet 
Plain. 11 oz, and light, II", oz., 

14x48 an, I 14x60 22 00 

Plain, II oz., and light, 16 OZ., 

"lar sizes 22 50 

Tinned copper sheet 

Planished 

BraZlers' (ill sheets). 

1x6 it , 95 io 30 lb. each, par lh 

" 35 to 45 " 

50-lh. and ahove " .... 



100 lb 

15 50 



25 on 



23 hi 

24 00 

32 00 

23 

'."J 
21 



BOILED AMi T K PITTS 

Plain tinned, per lh 

Spun, per lh 



28 



BB \ss 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to li" gauge, 15 per cent 

23 

I) 231 



ivou aim oneei , i-t m j 
Sheets, hard rolled, 2x4 
Tubing, base, per lb, 

HINC SPELTER, 

Foreign, per 100 II' 6 25 



ZINC SHEET 



5-CWt. casks 
Part casks. 



6 25 
6 75 



6 50 



, 5fl 



LEAD 



Imported Pig, per 100 Hi 

Bar, per lh 

Sleds. 3\ II'. s.| It., hy roll 
S B, 3 to 6 lb. " 



3 50 
06 
006] 

06 
Not:;. Cut sheets io. per lb., extra. Pipe, 

hy the roll, usual freights per yard, lists at 7c. 

per lb. and 30 p.c. dis t.o.i. Toronto. 
Note. Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 

8-ft lengths, lists at 8o. 

SHOT. 
Common, $6.51 r 100 lb.; .lolled. -7 00 

perltIO lb.: buck, seal I ball, 17.50, Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices an f.o.B. Toronto, 
Hamilton, .Montreal, St. John and Halifax, 
Terms, 3 p.c. rash, heights equalized, 

SOU PIPE \M> FITTINGS 

Light soil pipe, discount, 45 and 5 pel riot 

til I ingS, -lis Hit -VI and 5 p c. 

Med. and Extra heavy pipe and linings, dis 55 

and 5 per rent 
7 and 8-ill. pipe, discount W and 5 per rent 

SOLDER. Pit lh. 

Bai hall and halt, guari ied 20 

Bar, half-and-half, con ireial 19 19 

Refined 19 

Wiping 17 

ANTIMONY. 

Cooksons per lh. 

WHITE LEAD Per 100 lh. 



I 

No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

V. I 

Uunro's Si I 

Elephant and I > 

Brandram s Genuine 

Deooratlri 

S ] 

h brand 

Decorator s Pure 

Essex Genuine 



5 00 
3 874 



4 874 

I "in 

6 00 

5 50 

6 124 
5 50 

5 25 



BED I.I AH 

is, peri "i >i 75 - ■ oo 

"' II. kegs, 

N" I, loo II. kegs, per cwl i - • I 50 

WHITE zasc 

Extra Red Seal I 

No 1 1 

N" 2 

DRY W Hill, l.l \|. 

Pure, casks 5 25 

i' 

V. 1. ... '.- :, on 

Xo. 1, kegs 

PREPARED PAINTS 

in ;, ; and I 

Pure, per gallon I 20 

l qualities, per gallon . I iwi 

Barn (in bbls.) em D 90 

The Sherv, in- Williams paints I jo 

< lanads Pi pure. I 2 i 

Toronto Lead ft ' "i"' t \ . spure ... i .' ■ 

Sanderson Pearcy's pun 120 

Standard Paint Co. ■ " Ne« 

1 30 

"Globi 1 30 

ban, l,<| 70 

'I'll, Francis ■ Frost t 

" Ark Brand 1 26 

The Francis - PrOSl I 

British Navy deck 1 50 

Hollywood paste paint 1 Io 

liquid paint 

... 
ll. nderaon .x t'-.i i - Anchor 

Brand 1 35 

• iloi.e Paint ■ i 1 30 

Pain! barn and 

75 

COLORS IN oil. 
25-lt. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian red. per lh 

Chrome yell.. w 12 II I I 

Golden .. bo 07 10 

French " 

Mat ack 04 

( hrom, green 10 

French Imperial green oil 

Signwritcrs black 1''. 

«r o oi 

Sienna 04 07 

i OLORS, Hl;v 

Common ochre, bbls 115 130 

Y.1I..V. ...In. (.IF I, a l bill 

BrUSSeb ."lire 

Venetian red, i.i.i i :,o 

English oxides, per cwl 3 00 3 25 

oxides, bbls I 25 2 76 

Canadian oxides, bbls | 'i", 

. . |j c. 2 '*' 

Burnt sienna, pure, per Lb. 10 

" uinl" i. 

Ban 'iiiiii' i 08 ti in 

Drop black, pure ll In 

Chrome yellow, pure 

Chrome greens, pure per lb . . 09 n in 

03 04 

Ultramarine bine, in 28-lb. 

boxes, per lb 

Fire proof mineral, per 100 lb 100 

Genun I harge, perlb 07 

Mortar color, per 100 lb 

Pure Indian red, N'.. 15, lb.. 08 10 

Winn l.l.l 55 

jhvi ' iuiIkbi in 30-lb bgi 85 

blci an 

Casks, for spraying 5 50 

100-lb. lets do peril, 08 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Joseph Rodgers & Sons 

^ Limited 

SHEFFIELD, ENGLAND. 

Each blade of our Goods bears the 
exact mark here represented. 



I 

♦ JAMES HUTTON & CO., MONTREAL 



SOLE AGENTS 

IN CANADA. 




t 



POTTY. 

Bulk in 1 70 

Bulk in leas quantity 195 

Bladders in 2 00 

Bladder! in kegs, boiei or loose 2 25 

2 25 

2 50 

Bladder* m bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 2 50 

\ ll.SMlts 

in 5-gai lots. Per gal Net 

Carriage No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pali- durable UmIv 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold sue, Japan 150 160 

rnwn japan 85 9J) 

Elaati' 150 

Furniture extra 110 125 

Ho. 1 090 100 

Hani oil finish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 1 75 2 00 

Shellac white 2 40 2 50 

orange 230 240 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

No. 1. 85 90 

Elaatilite varnish, 1 gal. can. each.. 2 00 

(iranitine r! . ■■ . r finish. per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels: size 1, $1.20; 
si/c „\ 7*- . : size 3. 40c. each. 

i Williams kopal varnish, assorted 
from i pts to 1 gal.. $2.50. 

CASTOR OIL. 

British. 1st qual. in cases.iier lb 085 09J 

•■ small lots .... 10 10$ 

COD OIL, ETC. 

Cod oil. per gal 50 55 

Pure olive 140 

neatsfoot 90 

Common 008 009 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

(ielatine 

.Strip 18 20 

rs 19 20 

Hnttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

\ MMfNITIoX. 

Cartridges. 

nininn, ,V) and 5 per cent. 

Kim Fire Pistol, discount 40 pe, American. 

Kim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 
and Rifle, 10 p.©., Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes. Domin- 
ion. 30 per cent 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary. Dominion, 1"' per 

Central Fire, Military and Spot-tint-. Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent to li,t I! B Caps, 
discount 40 percent., Amerloan. 

I and empty Shells. "Trap" and 

25 per ',-iit Kival 
and Nitro, P) J* r cent, advance on list. 
Brass Shot Shells, V> i«t cent 
Primers, Dom . 30 per cent.; American, $1.60. 

Wadl |*-r lb. 

Best thics white felt wadding, in }-lh. 

bagK $1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-11. bagi 70 

lick white card wads, in boxes 
of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

i ach, 10 gauge 35 

ick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 8 gauge ~y> 

rhin 'anl wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each. 8 gauge * 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 

cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

I and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 ,T 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 



Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 10! 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09} 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Hoys Axes *. 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 7 50 10 00 

AXLE UREASE. 

Ordinary, per gross 5 75 6 00 

Best quality 13 00 15 00 

RATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

.Standard Enameled. 

51-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

5J " " "2nd " 20 00 

BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 114 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo.. 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

I nipt rial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

Nc. 1 12 

No 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. i 05 

BXLL8. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 j>er cent. 
Nickel, 5"> per cent 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63J per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Kargant's 5 50 8 00 

Peterboro', discount 46 per cent. 

Farm. 
American, each 125 3 00 

House. 

American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 per cent 



BELTING. 

Extra, 60 percent 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 percent. 



Auger. 
(lilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour's, 475 to 50 percent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz &5 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

bolts and nuts. Percent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 50 and 10 
" full sq. (§2. 40 list) 55 and 10 
" " Norway Iron (S3 

list) 55 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50, 5 and 10 

Plough Bolts 50,5 and 10 

Blank Bolts 50, 5 and 10 

Bolt Ends 50, 5 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65, 5 and 10 

Coach Screws, cone point 663 and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3jc. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 55 to 6c. 

boot calks 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " ■ 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 62^ P er cent. 

BROILERS. 
Light, discount 65 to 675 per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 675 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 375 per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Henis. No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " .... 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 



12 00 



11 00 
20 00 



BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 1 75 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb., 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 60 

o. K k I. X. L... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized... " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 00 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 25-inch, and 81.90 for 2-inch. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 



Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 25 per cent " 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2J per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 peroent. 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Billiards " .... 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 571 Per cent. 
Plate, discount 525 to 575 P«'r cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 
Nos. 31 and 32 per gross 8 50 9 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CHURN 

Revolving Churns, metal frames— No. 0, $8 
No. 1, $8.50; No. 2, $9.00; No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00; No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames, 20c. each less than the above 
Discounts : Factories, 53 per cent. . 
delivered from stock in Montreal, 51 per 
cent. Terms 4 months or 3per cent, cash in 
30 days. 

Churn frames, including bearings, levers, etc. 
Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, $2.40; and 4 and 
5, $2.65. Metal frames, 25c. extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent,., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 
Axle, discount 65 per cent. 

closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. . . $9 60 

Emb. " " . 10 20 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Teu. Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emb. " " " ..6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 6 00 

Low " " emb... 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ontario Syphon Jet, plain 11 70 

Low " " " emb'd. 12 3" 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 

American, discount 625 to 65 per cent . 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. & D., No. 3 per pair 174 

8. &D., " 5 n 225 

8. *D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod (15 p.c. ), per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Coach and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 per 

cent. 
Carpenters', discount 60 and 10 per ■■cut 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We Make the Goods You Want 

because your customers want the goods we make. Send u-> your orders for 
BUILDING PAPERS, ROOFING FELTS, WIRE EDGED BEADY 

ROOFINU, and all parties will be satisfied. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toror»-to and Montrea I. 



drii.i a 

Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Kails, pet doz., ael Ui I 

DRILL II I - 

Morse, discount 374 to 40 pet oent. 
Standard, disoounl 50 and 5 to 55 i" i cent. 

FAUCI I- 

Oommon, oork-lined, discount 3ft per cent 

i n iii: BS 

10-inch per 100 ft. 3 10 

elbows (storepipe.) 

and 6-ineh, common per doz. 1 20 

7 inch " 1 35 

Polished, IV. per dozen extra'. 
BSGUTOB SONS. 
Discount 40 per oent. 

KM I T< llloN I'lXS. 

Iron, discount 10 pel 

FACTORY MILK l'V\~ 

Discount otf revised list, 40 percent, 

FILLS AMD l: vxi's. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " in 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disstone 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MeClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and ft 

Royal 80 ". 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list. 26 to -'71 pei 
Nicholson File Co s Simplicity" file handle, 

per gross 85c. to SI. 50 

GLASS 

Window, Box Price, 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 3 80 .... 6 75; 

26 to 40 2 10 4 00 .... 7 25 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 8 75 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 10 00 

61 to 70 ft 00 .... 11 51 

71 to 80 5 50 .... 12 50 

81 to 85 14 00 

86 to 90 16 50 

91 to 95 18 00 

96 to 100 20 00 

A dis ount of 25 per cent, is o»fered on 
" Double D.amond.' 

i. \t OB8. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc 
Stanley's, discount 50 to 5ft per cent 

Wire Ganges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 85 2 40 
HALTERS 

Kope, |-inch per gross 

Rope, I " " 9 00 

Rope, i to 5-inch " 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz. 3 871 4 00 

Leather, 1} " " 5 15 5 20 

Web " 187 2 4ft 

HAMMI 1 ■- 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per oent Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 per cent 
Tack 

Magnetic per doz 1 10 1 20 

SI - 

anadian per lb. 074 085 

Ball Peso, 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 O-JB 

HAN I 

Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 
tore door per doz. 100 150 



Pork, 
C 1 !'.., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Hoi 

i \ B., diSOOUnI 10 per cent , revised list. 

Ban 

American per dci i 00 

Plane 

American per gross 3 15 3 7ft 

Hammer and Hatchet. 

Canadian, discount 40 pei 

Cross-Cm SawB 
Canadian per pair 13j 

ii v nueks. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 5 00 

5-inch 6 50 

Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. 11 J, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No It. 15 tool run 21 on 

, per foot .... 045 
ll UB1 SBI C00L8. 
Discount 60 per oent. 

II \li HITS. 
Canadian, discount 40 to 425 l>er cent. 

BAT K\ VMKI. 
Hen derson & Putts' "Anchor Brand 

BINGES. 

Blind, Parkers, discount ID-; percent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb Otjj 

ft-in., " 061 

O-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 053 

10-in., " 05J 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and ft pi 
Screw hook and binge 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb. 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 pei oi nl 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

hollow w IKE 

Discount 45 and ft per cent. 

HOOKS 

Cast Iron. 

Birdcage per doz. 50 110 

Clothes line " 27 63 

Harness " 72 88 

Hat and coat per gro. 100 3 00 

Chandelier per doz. 0.50 100 

VI rough! Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples, Canadian dis- 
count I' 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 4ft per cent. 

Bell per 1,000 .... 60 

, bright, discount ftft per cent. 
■ ■ i. n Ul.s. 

and, 40, lOand 74 percent off list <>>al 

"M ' brand, fto, 10 and ft per cent. I lead 

Countersunk. 57; per r. m 
"Monarch, 60 per cent. 
" Peerless ' 50 per cent. dis. 
HoLsi -ll"l B 

I-' ii B Montreal 
\ 1 do 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

Light, medium and heavy 3 35 3 60 

3 60 3 85 

shoes. 

Light 3 45 3 70 

i weight (all sizes) 4 85 4 Sft 

I' i "IS Toronto. Hamilton, London and 
Guelnh, 10c per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

i vhn \ i D « UU 
Discount 45 and 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

[< L I'll K- 

Star per doz. 00 3 25 



Copper per lb. 30 o 50 

SO, 60 and 111 tO 66 and ft per cent 

Lock, Canadian dis 40 U) 40 and 10 per cent 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 

American per gross .... 60 

K No lis 

Do ir, lapanned and M', per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin ,>er doz. 2 7ft 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, K. t I. 

•\ per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs .per do/ 100 

inv knu 

Ne| p| 

LAMP v, [OKB 

Discount. 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No 3, "Wright s " 8 50 

Ordinary, with <) burner. ... " I mi 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

\ " 5 75 

Japanning, ftilc. perdoz extra. 

LEMON S.H'F.KZF.RS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 1 87 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINES. 

Fish per gross 1 06 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN Mow I EM 

Wt.ndyatt, 12-in. wheel 7 50 

Star " 5 50 

Daisy " 4 90 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 6 50 

Ontario, " 14 25 

Discount, 50 per cent. 

Maxwell A Sons : 

10', -in high wheel 7 50 10 00 

.' in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS 

Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 

ell&Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 

Cabinet. 

Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 
Padlocks 
English and Am perdoz. 50 6 

Kagle, discount 20 to 2ft per cent. 
M intisi: SCREWS. 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 2ft per 1 ent 
Hound head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths perdoz. 125 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTo, k- 

Canadian per dor. 5 50 6 50 

Ml V 1 I I li 

American, discount 33 i per cent. 

German, 15 per rent 

Gem each .... 11" 

MILK OAK TIUMMINls 

Disoounl 

NAILs. Cut. Wire 

2d and 3d 3 45 3 45 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4 and .VI 2 85 2 95 

6 and 7d 2 75 2 80 

IM 260 260 

10 and 12d 255 255 

Jul 2 50 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 45 2 45 

Cat nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are #2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra 

Mi Uaneous wire nails, discount 75 per rent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per 



■.Ml. PI Ud 
German and American 1 7ft 3 50 

'.VII 

Square, round ami octagon. 

s 3 38 4 00 

Diamond I 00 2 00 

Co I III:', M I I is. 

1 in Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per , 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, 60 1 1 



I s Navy iht 100 lb 

Plumbers 



3 «> 



\l I larj - Model galvanized 
oil can. Kltb nilllip, 6 gallon, 

l'i/en In mi 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 |s r cent 

1 lopper l>er doz. 1 2ft 

1 50 
Malleable, discount 2ft |n-r cent 

(IALV 1MZI D IMI.s 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 16 
Flaring pattern. disOOOnt 4ft per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 4ft jmt c 

m IB R Mr 
Discount 40 per oent otf list. Jllle 
10-qt flaring sap buckets, disoounl 40 percent 
1'., 10 and II .|t tlaring pails, dis 40 per ecu' 
Creamer cans, discount 10 : 



III Tl LI N UU 




Porcelain hea<l l>cr grow 1 35 

Brass head " 40 


1 50 
1 00 


111 M 111 "III 




Tin and gilt, discount 7"> per oent. 




I'lNL TAR 




I pin) in tins . per gross . . . 


7 80 
9 60 



cum - 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent , 

Loan discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 375 to 
40 per cent. 

PLANE IKON- 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

II ILLS VNI. NIPPERS 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
374 to 40 per 

Button s imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 2 60 

Pl.t MliK.Ls Li: v~ - 

standi' km work. die. 60 per cent. 

"J.M.T." Cushion work, discount 50 pel 
Fuller work, discount ivft per cent. 
6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per ■ ent. 
Lever handle Stops and Waste, I 60 

percent With, in lots of 2 dozen and over, 

an extra discount of 10 per cent 
"J.M.T." Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

discount ft", per oent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Chi 

discount lift per cent 

1 M T ." Radiator Valves, discount 

cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 per 

cent 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount "0 
ent. 

No. 1 compression bath cot k net 2 00 

No. 4 " " 2 00 

n ; Fullers " 2 20 

No. 45, " " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold perdoz 15 00 

Patent Compression < imhton, bath 

D08 

Square head brass rocks, discount 60 per cent 

" " iron " " 60 

Competition Globe, Angle and Check Valve 

discount 70 per c 
Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 



,] 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I Roofing Pitch "t^T i 



JUST TO HAND A LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF THIS 
CELEBRATED PITCH; FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. 



Lockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal 



Bell Telephone Main 1089. 



^M»9W9S«9S«MM«S«9S«9S«MM»9Se9$«M»»WMS!MS«fi^ 



i i- m ih i - 
I • 

11 l.l I \ - 

perdu ii 56 100 
33 

Q 27 1 i 

I ii 35 2 50 
•|l UPS 

I 80 3 60 

in pitcher s|n,iu 1 40 2 10 

ii m bbs 

Kaddli i - perdoi 1 00 1 85 

C.uidu tor's " 9 00 1 

Tinners', solid per eel .... 72 

holloa .pet inch 1 00 

l.iv.l BOILERS 

id, 30 gallon Del 6 '"I 

35 '■ " 7 00 

8 00 
i 30 gallon, " 7 40 
35 ■■ - 3 40 
40 

- .U.m " 28"00 

24 00 
•■ u " 28 'W 
i ofl uopper boilers 15 per eent 
l: vki s. 
per doc n< t 1 20 up, 

RAZORS. per .l.i/. 

Elliots 4 00 18 00 

... 4 00 18 mi 

; 50 11 00 

King Cutter 12 50 15 oo 

. . 3 oo 10 mi 

.... 7 00 12 00 

Bail, i i 6 00 12 00 

iitfonl 10 IXI 11 oo 

15 00 

Griffon Barber's Favorite lo 7". 

13 00 

13 .VI 

Griffon Stropping Machine! 13 50 

■ Mean Kiitt.r B 50 10 50 
RB8ISI i Be 
I ■ 'lu \» r • nit 

RIVETS KM. B1 

Ir. ,i. 1 : i v . t ~ . black and tinned, discount 60 and 

Hi pei 
Iron Buns, discount 55 per cent. 

.11 Rivets in 1-lb. cartot 
l~r lb 

..ii Iron Hints in J-lb carto 
per lb 
CopP 1 r Rivi ' -. ■ ilh usual proportion Imrrs, 45 
pei mi Cartons, lc. per Lb, 

i Burr-. .ill) discount 30 and In per .em. 
I11111..I ..r Coppered Rivets, J-lb. 
per lb. 

I:l\ I I -II- 

35 i" 37] p. r cent. 

ROP1 

" Hi 

u u 

ilanilla 12 

3-16 inch Mid larg< r .... 16 

i ii„ 1. 11 21 

I in. I, 11 22 

' , 11 15 



Lath ■> 11 

double 11.'. 
■ 1 , onl, t- Ii 

BO feel " 80 

..." 11 95 
in 1.1 - 

Boxwood, di 

lv.,r>, d Vi per cent 

SAD [HON- 

\I- I 70 

No SO, ttickli -plated, " 
BAUD IMi KMBR1 Pi I 

V sand, discount, 40 and 5 per ■ enl 

■ (Barton 'a) a to 10 ptr cent, advance 
un list 



- IP BPOI 18. 

Bronzed Iron with hooks ....per 1,000 ! 

Mils 

Hand, Disston's, discount 13] percent. 
S \ li . discount 40 per .rut. 
Crosscut, Disston's per fool 3". 11 55 
s \ l) . .lis oiini 35 per cent, on Nob. 2 and 3. 

Hack, ' .impl.i. each 75 2 75 

frame only 75 

svsll WEIOHTS. 

Sectional per 1001b. 2 50 2 75 

Solid " 1 75 2 00 

- \-ll . ..1:1.. 

Per II. 25 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Seta, No 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
x fui Seta, No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

BC LLCS. 

Gurnej Standard, 40 percent, 
Gurney Champion, 50 percent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne 

Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
( lianipi.iii Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, discount 55 per eent 
Richelieu, discount 55 per eent. 
Warrens new Standard, discount 4ii percent. 
Champion, discount 50 per cent 
Weighbeams, discount 35 per eent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN DOORS. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style per do/.. 6 80 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

n stain..!, 4-in. style.. ..per doz. 7 00 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, ]•'. H , bright and steel, discount 87i 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H , bright, dis. 82} percent. 
F. H., brass, dis. 80 percent, 
R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
R. H., " dis. 70 per cent 
Drive Screws, dis. 87i percent. 

Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon < lap, dis 45 per cent. 
SCYTHES. 

I'erdoz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

-ii BARS 
Bailey Cutlery Oo., full nickeled, disoou 

and 21 per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 67) 

per cent. 
Seymours, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS ASH SPADES. 
Canadian, discount 45 per cenl 

-INKS 

iron, 16 x 24 S5 

18 x 30 1 00 

18 x 36 1 40 

s\ \l- 

German, discount 25 pe 1 

Lock, Andrews 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING ikons. 

1, 14-lb peril, 37 

2 lb. ..rover " .... 34 

- 1 ■ ' LRE8. 

Iron. No. 493 perdoz. 2 40 2 55 

11 .. " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per . ent. 
'fry and Bevel, discount 50 to 52 J per cent. 

- 1 \ Mill. WARE. 
Plain, discount 75 and 12J per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Returned, discount 75 percent, off re'iBed list. 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 25 3 50 

Plain 2 90 3 15 

( '....pels . .lis.. noil 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS \ n H DIES. 
American discount 25 per cent 

s Ti INK. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

llin.loslan " 116 'I H7 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador — 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 150 

Wai« r of-Ayr " .... 10 

.Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind, 2-in.,40 to 200 Ib.,per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 

7 inch " " .... 7 50 

KNAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case, .net cash .... 4 80 
No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " .... 8 40 

TACKS, HliADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks,- blued ,. 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk 80 and HI 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk — 85, I2j and 12; 
" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12.' 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKs 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52i 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

( lout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " ill bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINKS 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, I'atent Caller 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman'l each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

1 DINERS' SNIPS. 
Bailey B, discount 25 per eent . 

THERMOMETERS 
Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cenl. 

THAI'S (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 26 per cenl 
Game, 11 & N , P S. ft W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 72j, 75 percent 
trowels. 

Ill- . ill- HI pel 01 Ml 

German perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

S. &l D. disc. mill 35 per cent. 
TWINES 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, coiion, 3-ply 19 

" " 4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb. 33 1 6 

Staging " 27 35 

\ 1-1 - 

Wright's 134 

Brook's 12,' 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3.50 

No. 2 5 50 

Saw ViBt 4 50 9 00 

72 



I S X MKI.I.KD » UU 

White, Prince w, Turquoise, Blue and Whit. 

disei.l lit 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount .11 and 

10 per < ent 

Granite or 1 earl, Ii -rial, Creecent,dii count 

50, 10 and In per oen 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge « 50 

10 " lie. extra. 

11 " 12c 

12 " 20c. 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c 

15 " 65c 

16 " 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for I inning. 

Extra net per 100 lb oiled wire lite., 

spring wire 81.25, special hay baling wire 30c , 

beSl sleel wile 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 

charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in .asks 

or eases 15 . bagging and papering 10c., 50 

and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 251b. bundles 

15c.. in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25e . in lib. 

hanks, lb. hanks "5c, in (-lb. 

hanks si. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
I.isi ..I extras: In 100-lb. lots: No 17, 
s.5 No. 18, S5 511 No. 19, so No. 20, $6.65- 
No. 21, |7— No. 22, $7.30 No. 23, $7,65 No. 
24, S8-N0. 25, $9— No. 26, $9.50 No. 27, 
si" No .28. 811 No. 2:1. si2 No 311. si:; 
No.31,sl4 N... 32, sir, No 33, sic, No. 34, 
817 Extras net— tinned wire, Nos 17 25, 
$2- Nos. 26-31. *4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered. 
5c. oiling, 10c. in 25-lb. bundles, 15c. in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c. ill lib. hanks, 25c 

in i-lh. hanks, 3Sc. in J-lb. hanks, 51 k- 
packed in casks ..1- cases, 15c bagging or 
papering, 10c. 

Brass wire, discount 621 per cent, ofl the list. 

Copper wire, discount 62J per cent, net cash 
30 days. f.o.b factory. 

Galvanized wire, per 100 lb. Noa. 1 and 5, 
*3.70 to $3.90 Nos. ii, 7,8, $3.15 to S3 35 
N.i 9, $2.50 — No. 10, $3.20 to S3. 40 
—No. 11, $3.25 to §3.45 - No. 12, $2.6" 
—No. 13, $2.75 No. 14. $3.75 to $3.95 No 
15, S4.30 No. 16. S4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, S2.27J f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
12Je. less. 

Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. $2.90; No. 19, $2.60 Hollov, 
6 strand, No. 17, 14.30 ; No 18, $2.70; No 
19, $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING, 

Galvanized barb 2 80 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, fob. Cleveland. $2 55} in 
less than carlots, and S2 15 in carlots. 
SOILED si-kim: » 11:1: 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 75 

No 11 3 40 

No 12 2 95 

wiiik CLOTH, 
Painted Screen, par 100 sq.ft., net.. 1 50 

Terms, 3 per cenl ofl 30 days. 
WASTE COTTON 

Colored per lb. 

White " 008 

wnKN.11 1- 

Aeiii.-. discount 35 to 371 per cent 
Agricultural, discount 00 percent. 

C01 1.1 ilium 1, discount 20 to 25 pei ci m 
Towers Bnginei 1 each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 6 00 

G, \ K s F'ipe " .... 3 40 

Hurrells Pipe each ... 2 00 

Pocket perdoz. 25 2 90 

wins.. ESS. 

I.ea.l.-r per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " .... 24 00 

Royal American " .... 24 00 

Sampson " .... 24 00 

Lightning " .... 27 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days 
Wll.il 1,11 I [RON » \MIEKS. 
Canadian make, diseount40 per eent. 



HARDWARE AMD METAL 




No Hard Blades Razor. 
No Soft Blades 
No Temper Streaks 

i No Returned Blades to the dealer- 
Will Shave for Years Without Re- 

' quiring Honing 



Retail Price $2.00 



BOOKLET 

COMING 

if you'll ask for 
a copy 'with 
trade discount. 



Firm 
of 



Mfrs. of 



if>3-401 Broadway, New York Cit 




A. l. silb: 



cBELTING 



"Your 'Para' Rubber Belling has pi 
in every way tj ■ i i t •» satisfactory." 



Canada Paper i >' , 
Moi 



THE 



Canadian RubberC° 



MONTREAL -;> TORONTO 
WINNIPEG 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 



"YANKEE' 7 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
N°I5 




Our "YAN KEE " Tool Boo k 
tells all about them. Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee'' Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 

t — awl i. 




No. 30 " Yankee ' Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points in Handle. 




No. 50. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Brass Wood, etc. 



Manufacturers also ot 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 

Cold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 
Sisal Rope 
Jute Rope 
Russian Rope 
Marline 
Housellne 
Hambroline 
Clotheslines 
Tarred Hemp Rope 
White Hemp Rope 
Bolt Rope 
Hide Rope 
Halyards 
Deep Sealine 
Ratline 
Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster Marlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY, 

•a Limited 

Western Ontario Representative— 

wm b. stewart, MONTREAL, QUE. 

Tel. 94. 27 Front St., West, Toronto. 



Pure Manila Rope , 

Highest Quality made, 

British Manila , 
Sisal Rope, 



Pure Sisal, 



Binder Twine 



Lathyarn. 



-New twine in flat packs of 
every description. 



Lowest prices and highest quality. 



Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 

Long Distance 'Phone 162 LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 

The latest and finest machinery is operated in this factory 

and although not the largest, it is the finest 

Mill of its size in the world. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




WE WANT YOUR ORDER, GET OUR PRICES BEFORE LAYING IN YOUR 

CORN KNIVES 
CORN HUSKERS 
CORN SHELLERS 




<j r- 



>»mm 







3 



BLOOD'S CLIPPER Corn Knife, cast steel, bronzed, woo<l handle. 



Jj) 




y 




SOUTHERN CHIEF Corn Knife, highly tempered, both sides ground. 



No 



X44 -Coin Husker, mule skin, steel discs. 




PLACE 

YOUR ORDER 

NOW. 



MEET THE SEASON 

WITH 

THE GOODS. 




PLYMOUTH ROCK Corn Shelter, shells 8 bushels an 

hour, deposits the Shelled corn in one box 

and cobs in another. 



No I— Corn Husker. heavy glove leather, steel clad, steel hook. 






s - q, ac k HAWK 



No. 0065 — Husking Tin, mule skin cot. 
No. 0060— " " without " 



Front. 



Bac 



BLACK HAWK Corn Shcller, malleable iron, chilled bearings, easily 
adjusted, deposits the shelled corn in one box and cobs in another. 



LEWIS BROS. & Co. 



QUOTE I TORONTO, 

LOW 87 YORK ST. 



Address all correspondence to 

MONTREAL 



OTTAWA. 

54 QUEEN ST. 



SHIP 
QUICK 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



GALVANIZED NETTING 



Season 
1904^ 




Best quality Steel 
Wire Galvanized 

before woven. 

3 ply rope selvage. 

Easiest to erect. 



When placing your orders stipulate for Greening's make. Do not accept the cheap 

inferior goods that are now flooding this market. Our make is very little 

higher in cost, but by far the cheapest, quality considered. 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Montreal, Que. 




COPPER WIRE 

I Of IWagraph, Telephone, Trolley 
and Transmission Lines. 

BRASS WIRE 

Of all kinds and for all purposes. 

PLAIN WIRE 

Annealed, Annealed and Oiled, 

Tbmed, Coppered, Bright and 
i red Spring Wire. 

GALVANIZED WIRE 

Fur Telegraph and Telephone— 
Barl> Wire, Plain Twist tlalvanized 
I led sprint; Fencing; fialvan- 
i/.<1 Wir'-, straightened and cut 
any length for fenee purposes. 

BALING WIRE 

Pot fathne Shingles, Pulp, Hay, 
Rags, etc. (Straightened, col any 
length. 



WIRE NAILS 

of all kinds and for all purposes 

WOOD SCREWS 

Flat Head, Round Head, 
Bright and Brass. 

BRIGHT STEEL 
WIRE GOODS 

Gate Hooks and Eyes— Screw 
Hooks, Screw Eyes. 
Jack Chain— Single Steel 

and Brass. 
Jack Chain— Double Steel 

and Brass. 
"Crescent" Hat and Coat Hooks. 
Wire Door Pulls, Cotter Pins. 

STAPLES 

Poultry Netting, Barrel, Blind, 

Bed and Fenee. Special Staples 
made to order. 



Manufactured by 

Dominion Wire Manufacturing Co. 

LIMITED 
MONTREAL AND TORONTO. 

HEAD OFFICE °SWa3fftt* MONTREAL 

Long Distance 'Phone to all Departments. 




Wise Buyers 



Want. 



Best 
Values. 

Be Wise and 



PERFECTION WIRE CHAINS 




-MADE IN— 




COW TIES, 


Smoothest 


HALTER CHAINS, 


Strongest 


DOG CHAINS, 


HENCE THE 


TRACE CHAINS, 




HOBBLE CHAINS 


BEST MADE 



SPREADER CHAINS and tor STALL FIXTURES. 

WK STAND BEHIND OOB GUARANTEE. 

McKINNON DASH & METAL WORKS CO., 

ST. CATHARINES, ONT. Iimited 

FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SSSS the GEO. B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron and Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Uuards, Wire Cloth, 
Moulders' Kiddles, Children's Cots. Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron Fencing, Window Fix- 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work 

' 117 King St. West, TORONTO, ONT. 




WOVEN WIRE 
FENCING 



Made from No. 9 hard 
steel wire throughout. 

Made to sell, to last, 
and to give satisfaction. 
That is why the IDEAL is 



THE BEST SELLER. 

If not represented there, write for catalogue ai 
prices. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 



Unexcelled in quality. 
THE 



Prompt shipment. 



McGregor-Banwell Fence Co., 



WINDSOR. ONT. 



Limited. 




A FENCE 

to Protect 
and Adorn. 

Made of steel roils In different sizes and heights to adapt It to the various r.-iniirenienta, the 

Hart Ilia II Steel Picket Fence 

B ■*■ ■ »■■■■■•"■".■■ lsllil . IIHiM ,„, ,,„!„,., „, ,|„. markat Adapted albs to 
Lawns and Private Property, Parks, Cemeteries, Schools, Church Lots, etc 
It preserves its alignment, is handsome In appearance and permanently serviceable. Catalog 
free on application. Write for it. 
CUYAHOGA WIRE & FENCE COMPANY., Dcpt W.CUYAHOGA FALLS, OHIO. 




Canadian Representative : 
75 YEARS 



ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



7S YEARS 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 

IF* / \A/E 

That the SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS Babbitt Metal and Solder are the best on earth, you would be inclined 
to view the statement in a sceptical light and consider it off color, but that is exactly what we claim and can prove 
what we say, not by arguments but by thousands of testimonials from firms who have used it for the last 15 years, and 
are still using it. 

Ask your dealer for the SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS Babbitt Metal and Solder, and if they don't keep it, 
send your order direct to us and tell us for what purpose you would want it, and we will send you the right metal at the 
right price. 

Remember, and don't forget, that the SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS, Montreal, are the largest Babbitt Metal 
and Solder manufacturer under the British Flag. 

SYRACUSE SMELTING WORKS 

MONTREAL, CAN., NEW YORK, U S.A., and SEATTLE, WASH. 



T 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 



»de in 6 - ilue obtainable. Specially 

signed for export With or without " Kmlyn 



Mad 

Patent Guard. Sole maker — 



CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

C»bV- 1 -".inlyn Kngineering Works, 

c-iy,' Newport, NnvrOKT, MoN., ENGLAND. 

ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 

NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

, . , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of EL ECTRO PLATE. . . . 

A8k for our Catalogue and Quotations, 

Steward & Romaine Mfg. Co. 

EXPANSION and 
TOGGLE BOLTS 

For fastening all kinds of material to Brick, 
Stone or Cement, 

124 North Sixth St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



A* 



ONTARIO WIND ENCKE 
& PUMP G 




Atlantic Ave.Joronto 



Fire Clay 
aud Asbestos, 
Furnace Cement 



STOVE BRICK 

All kinds of Fire ( lay products made to 
order from patterns. Wiite for Price List, 

TflNF^ RRfK BRACONDALE, P.O., ONT. 

JUltLJ L)'\UJ., (NEAR TORONTO) 



America is bound to 

The highest lustre quickly 
metals. 


shine. 

produced 


on all 


Solarine 


Sat 


isfies 




Solabixi injures m ,t I 

"SOLARINE," 

Chi \t« ^ 


ing. 
■ork. 


Ask your jobber or 

TORONTO. 

Baltimore. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

is YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No.H. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.8.A. 



Insure Your Parcels 

reaching your customers in 
good order by using our brown 
and manilla wrapping paper. 
It is a thoroughly dependable 
paper. 

Made In Canada 
by the 

CANADA PAPER CO., Limited 

TORONTO and MONTREAL 



PATENT STEEL HOG TROUGHS 




Something new, something 

long wanted. 

A fine line for Hardware trade. 

Write for 

Prices and Agency- 



I am placing on the market this Steel Hog Trough, made of No. 14 Steel Boiler Plate. A trough that 
■t is impossible for the hogs to chew or destroy. Edges finished with ^ wrought iron pipe, slotted and 
driven on. Cross bars to prevent hogs from crowding or lying in trough. 

Every hog raiser wants them and is going to have them when he finds out what they are. A great 
seller, as they are practically indestructible. 



WILBER S. GORDON, 



TWEED, ONT. 



6. A. Crosby & Co. of Ontario, 

SARNIA, ONT. 




LIMITED 



Manufacturers of 



Patent Automatic Can Making Machinery, Presses, 
Dies and Special Machinery for Working Sheet Metal 

H. W. Petrle. 111-145 Front Street West, TORONTO Selling Agent. 



When ordering your stock of Whip?, remember that 

THE MORGAN WHIPS 

Are the standard for 

Quality, Workmanship, Durability, 

LOOK FOR THE MORGAN LABELS. 

Manufacture,! by THE MORGAN COMPANY, Limited 

Ask your dealer for them. TORONTO, ONT. 



CMAS. P. CLARK, President. 



JARED CHITTENDEN, Treasurer. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Exeoutive Offices: Nos. 346 and 848 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers Information that reflects the financial condition and the 
controlling circumstances of every seeker of mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the merchants, 
by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information, no effort Is spared, and 
no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may Justify its claim as an authority on all matters 
affecting commercial aflairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have been steadily extended, and 11 
■iur llshes Information concerning mercantile persons throughout the civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, Jobbing and 
manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. Specific 
terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX, N.8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B. 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



THOS. C, IRVING: Gen. Man, Wettern Canada, Toronto, 




Vollmar 



Improved 
Perfect 



Washer 



It has a most enviable record. A perfection of its kind 
— will wash more clothes in less time, do it better antl 
easier, with less wear and tear, than any other machine. 
Prices on application. 

Oolborne. Sept 10th, 1902, 
Messrs. Wortman k Ward Mfg. Co., LONDON, 

DEAR Sirh,— We have used the washer again and find thai fiirllu-r use 
increased its value bo us. The girls are simply delighted with it, as they can 
do 1 be trashing ami be presentable fur callers if need be. 

MRS. 1! WEEKS. 

The above is a sample of the many kind words said about the Vollmar 
(l'se the street No. when addressing us.) 

The Wortman & Ward Mfg. Co., Limited 

No. 1 500 William Street, London, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RO DVACC 9 r^r\ PORT TALBOT, SOUTH WALES, 
. D. D T MOO OL UU., GREAT BRITAIN. 

Largest MAKERS OF 

BEST SIEMENS STAMPING ENAMELING 

BLACK PLATES, 

CIRCLES. RECTANGLES, Etc. 

MAKERS of all descriptions of STEEL SHEETS . 
Brands SKER, and SKER BEST." 

Sole Canadian Export Agents, 

ROBERT CROOKS & CO., Botolph House, 10, Eastcheap, LONDON, E.C. 



Cable address : " CROLLO," LONDON. 



WALKERS QUICK^EA SY 155 PICKS 



SEVERALOTHERSTYLES ILLUSTRATED IN OUR 1903 CATALOGUE 



MADE OF CRUCIBLE STEEL. OIL TEMPERED. ANTI-RUST. NICKEL PLATED. x - 
WILLNOT BEND, BREAK OR RUST. EACH ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 

Erie Specialty Company Erie. Pa 



Hardware! Hardware! 



To Lumbermen, Contractors, and Merchants Of the Ottawa Valley — Has it ever 
occurred to you that you could Save a Profit and get exactly what, the Trade 
Requires by purchasing your supplies from 

THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., Limited, !E£E£2; Ottawa, Ont. 



EVERYTHING IN HARDWARE. 



P. S.-SEND FOR PRICES. 



ATKINS 2i? H .1» SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, TEM- 
PER, WORKMANSHIP, FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 
OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 



I 



^mmirmm 



___ ECATPUNSICOINOIANAPOLIS 




E. C. ATKINS & CO., 



Lfading Manufacturers ok HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 
CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kinds. 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. Write for Catalogue and Prices 

H. P. HUBBARD. Bales Agent tor Canada. Toiw nii. , ; 30 Front St. Bast TYi Main UM 




i'? 



BARN D 




HARDWARE AND METAL 

STE 



AND 



the "PERFECT" 

LOOSE AXLE. 

- w 111 ELS 
•■ 1> 4 ill. 






[[ 



ttl* 



TRACK. 




4—+ 






in. 



STEEL TRACK. 1 in. x 3 16 in., WROUGHT BRACKETS. 
1 ', in. x :? 16 in., MALLEABLE 
MADE IN i, C. 8 and 10 feet lengths. 



the "ATLAS" 

ROLLER BEARINGS 

No, 0. Bin. WHEELS. 

" 1. 3% in. " 
" 2. 4 in. 



WE ARE THE ONLY MAKERS IN LARGE QUANTITIES IN CANADA. 



OUR QUALITY AND PRICES EQUAL, AND OUR FINISH EXCELS, ALL 
FOREIGN-MADE GOODS OF THIS CLASS. 



When ordering specify our make, and you will not only get better value, but 
will keep good Canadian money circulating in Canada. 



Manufactured by. 



1 1 1 m 



TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, GUELPH 

AT THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HARDWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 



Stem J) 




COLD 

BLAST 

LANTERNS 



If your customers 

want a Lantern that 

won't blow out 

" smoke 

" leak 

" break globes 
but will give a per- 
fect light in any wind 
sell them Kemp's. 

The acme of per- 
fection in lantern 
making. They will 
not cost you more 
than other makes. 



Kemp Manufacturing Co. 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



«*•»«•**«##•#*« ***.*#•* ft* 




m* 0mm* 



, 



Why Dunlop? 

Yes, some merchants have wondered why so 
many of their customers insist on the Dunlop 
Trade Mark on their bicycle tires, lawn hose, 
rubber heels, pneumatic and solid rubber carriage 
tires, rubber mats, etc. There is just one reason 
for it. They want the very best and they know 
they get it in 

Dunlop Quality. 

THE DUNLOP TIRF. CO., Limited, 

TORONTO, CANADA. 

Depots at Montreal, St. John, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



I 



* » P i ^ M ii m > pi* m » — * mw *» » » m *i 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JULY 18, 1903. 



NO. 29. 



Subjects Being Discussed at Ottawa 

Written for Hardware and Metal by a Member of Parliament 



THERE is joy in the camp of the 
British Columbia members over 
the announcement that the 
Government has decided, after 
all. " to do something" for the 
lead mining industry of British Columbia. 
Probably no state in the Union, certain 
ly no province in Canada, is so rich in 
silver lead mines as is British Columbia, 
and this richness is very largely neutral- 
ized, if not utterly destroyed, by the big 
American combine and the unfavorable 
smelter conditions locally. It has been 
1 1 rord by the British Columbia advocates 
of state aid that while the effect of the 
proposed legislation may be to increase 
slightly the price of lead to the con- 
sumers in other parts of Canada, that 
the fact must not be lost sight of, that 
the miners out there are large purchasers 
of the out-put of eastern factories, for all 
of which they pay an enhanced price, 
owing to the protection enjoyed by the 
latter. Not. only is this the case, but 
the British Columbians, from the circflm- 
stance that they manufacture but little 
locally, are also large importers from 
outside of Canada, on all of which they 
pay duty to the Treasury, so that, as a 
matter of fact, they pay in, in taxes, 
from two to three times as much per 
head of the population as do people in 
other parts of Canada. 

I believe that while there may be some 
objections taken to the proposed in- 
crease in bounties, it will not be very- 
great, and that it will be confined to 
certain theorists who worship a fetish 
instead of meeting a condition. 
* » * 

A kindred subject to this is that of aid 
for the iron and steel industries. As at 
present constituted, state aid is given 
by way of bounty, and by way of im- 
port duty. The bounty was on a scale 
diminishing with time, and the proposi- 



tion now is to keep it up to its old 
level for a further short period. As to 
the duty part of the matter, a large 
number of iron and steel manufactures 
now come into this country, either free 
or at i a low rate, so low as 10 per cent, 
in some cases. It is said that the large 
works at Sydney now propose to instal 
new machinery to produce goods not 
hitherto made in Canada, and that for 
this new product they ask the same pro- 
tection as is already accorded to articles. 
manufactured in Canada. Their position 
seems to be a strong one, if we justify 
the present duties, for, if the protection 
was right when afforded to an industry 
now in existence, it must be equally 
right to accord it to the manufacture of 
articles not hitherto produced. 

* » • 

The long discussion over the lengthy 
Railway Bill of the Hon. Mr. Blair is at 
last drawing to a close, and only a few 
of the more disputatious clauses still re- 
main to be passed upon. 

* # # 

In the early stages of the session we 
drew attention to certain farmers' 
grievances, which were exciting a great 
deal of attention among the rural mem- 
bers, and, inasmuch as the legislation 
proposed to remedy them had a very 
direct bearing upon the whole commun- 
ity as a " travelling public," we devoted 
some time to a discussion of the pros 
and cons, most notably in connection 
with cattle-guards upon railways. There 
has been a most vigorous struggle 
throughout, ranging from the railway 
position of a wish to retain the law as 
at present .constituted, which is very 
favorable to the roads, to the position 
of the promoter of what has become 
widely known as the Lancaster Bill, 
which sought to make the railways liable 
i) 



for all cattle killed, no matter what care- 
ts the farmer had been guilty of in 
connection with the accident, even if, to 
quote an extreme case, he had driven his 
cattle upon the railway in the hope of 
getting liberal damages for their death. 
A middle course has been hit upon, and 
will most likely be law by the time this 
reaches our readers. The railway is to 
be required. as of yore, to maintain 
cattle-guards, " suitable and sufficient" 
to turn cattle from getting on the track, 
and is to be liable to pay the owner the 
value of the animal killed which has got 
on the railway right of way because of 
the absence or insufficiency of cattle- 
guards, unless the railway proves that 
the farmer has been actually guilty 
of negligence, by himself or his agent, in 
connection with the accident. Under the 
old law it mattered not how guiltless of 
carelessness the farmer was, if a high 
wind had thrown down his fence in the 
night, if the ubiquitous book agent had 
called and left the gate open, as he 
usually does, still the poor farmer had 
to shoulder the loss when, as a conse- 
quence, his cattle strayed away and got 
killed. Now- this is all altered ; only his 
own carelessness, by himself or his agent, 
can disentitle him to recover. The tra- 
velling public is still protected from the 
carelessness which absolute immunity 
might engender in the farmer by two 
risks he still runs : (1) If the animal is 
killed not upon the railway's own pro- 
perty, but at the point of intersection of 
the railway and the highway, he cannot 
recover, and f'-M \nv person can impound 
cattle found running at large within half 
a mile of the intersection of the highway 
and the railway at rail level. This latter 
seem a trivial protection to those 
who do not know the farming commun- 
ity. As a matter of fact, however, there 
is nothing which a farmer more heartily 



HARDWARE AXD METAL 



dislikes than hav in- bU inn to 

pound. Not only doea ho decidedly ob- 

«1 entailed, but he b 

Application o( brute force, 

which is humiliating to him. Just let 

the railway section men drive Borne care- 

i to the nearest pound, and 

that man will a most exemplify 

the tending of his cat- 

of his life. The 

point "In most choral satisfa ■ 

in this matter Iks in 

t that the railwi absolutely 

carelessness <>f the 

and that the farmer is not 

■ prove his innocence of it, as 

v many who have been 

interesting themselves in this bill. 

• • • 

only have the farmers distinctly 
I in the matter of cattle-guards. 
but they also win in the matter of fires 
kindled by railways. As the law pre- 
viously stood, a farmer had to prove, 
not only that the railway set fire to bis 
property, but also, that it set fire 
• ntly. which interpreted means, for 
example, that there was something faulty 
in the construction of the engine which 
threw the sparks. This was practically 
an impossibility. No farmer could follow 
an engine up to its round-house and 
there make an examination of the fire 
screen to see whether its mesh was of the 
required fineness and in good repair. To 
prove out of the mouths of the railway 
men themselves that anything was wrong, 
again and ao-ain proved impracticable, 
so that lawyers had pretty generally 
taken to advising their clients that it 
was useless to enter suit. The law, as 
just enacted, throws very properly upon 
the farmer the burden of proving that 
the engine started the fire complained of, 
but, havine proved that, the railway 
company must show that it was opera- 
tine its road with proper plant in a fit 
state of repair and without carelessness 
in so doing-. The change seems a simple 
one, but it will mean that hereafter an 
owner of land along a railway right of 
way will be able to recover in cases 
where he is reasonably entitled to do so, 
and will no longer be met by the imposi- 
tion of a condition which it is impossible 
to fulfil. 



WILL USE MUCH UNITED STATES 
ORE. 

CORNELIUS Shields, president of the 
t onsob dated Lake Superior Com 
I iny, has, according to an ex- 

change, made this statement regarding 
the alfairs ( ,f the company at the Sault : 
"In the manufacture of steel rails at the 
Sault. which will be started, a-- I expect. 
at the beginning of July, we will this 
n-e 90 per cent, of ore from the 
M> -ai.a district and 20 per cent, of the 
ore from the Helen mine. This mixture 



of ore will enable us to bum out a rail 

equal to am manufactured any place in 

the world. Two of the blowing furnaces 

are completed, and the machinery for two 

others is on the ground, ready to he in 
stalled. By next \iai we will have made 
arrangements to secure from our proper- 
ties in Minnesota, ore that is practically 
a duplicate of that to be found in the 
Vermillion range. This will enable us to 
dispose of an increased quantity of the 

ore from the Helen mine, for which there 

-none- demand throughout the I nited 

Siatc-. This year we will dispose of 
close to 500,000 tons to different manu- 
facturers, shipping it even as far as Vir- 
ginia. The demand has been so great 
that we have been Obliged to refuse or 
ders. The Helen oie is of a peculiar 

nature and has been found very valuable 

when mixed with other ores* for the manu- 
facture of a specially high grade of steel, 
and on this account a good price is be 
in- secured for it." 



THE CONCENTRATED ORDER OF 
HOO-HOO 

ON Tuesday, duly 7, the first conca- 
tenation in the jurisdiction of Ear- 
Ian L. Hubbard, Canadian repre- 
sentative of E. C. Atkins & Co., Inc., 
who is vice-reoent of Eastern Ontario, 
was held in Toronto. As this was the 
fust meeting of the order in this district, 
nine Buffalo members came over, filling 
the following offices : Snark of the Uni- 
verse, Senior Hoo-Hoo, -Junior Hoo-Hoo. 
Bojum, Scrivenator, Jabberwock, Custe- 
catian. Arcanoper, Gurdon. 

A class of twelve were initiated and 
shown the wonders of Hoo-Hoo, and en- 
joyed the fragrance of the onion bed. 
They were pronounced by the older Hoo- 
Hoo the most amiable string of kittens 
they had led through the gardens in many 
a night, and it speaks much for the good- 
fellowship of their Canadian cousins that 
they all so thoroughly enjoyed them- 
selves, particularly the strong and eleva- 
ting talk and instructions of the -Junior 
Hoo-Hoo. 

One of the candidates came prepared for 
an exhibit of the terpsichorean art, which 
he gave in such a manner as to highly 
delight his fellow candidates. A short. 
but spirited exhibition of the manly art 
was also much applauded. 

Candidates stepped high and carefully 
over the fences of the gardens and bent 
low at the warning of "low bridge." 
The night was warm and though the can- 
didates had been served the usual refresh- 
ments, they still later enjoyed a decidedly 
unique menu, which was served at Clan- 
cy's Cafe. The serving of this was en- 
livened by much cross-fire talk between 
the new-made kittens, by speeches from 
Joseph Oliver, Acting Snark Stanton. 
Walter Laid law, Supreme Jabberwock 

10 



Orson E. Yeager, Bojum Jno. heist, and 
a short bright talk on the purposes of 
the order by Curt M. Treat. 

The concatenation was pronounced by 
the oliler BOO lloo a great success and 
another initiation will likely take place 
at an cail\ date. The candidates initial 
ed on Tuesday last week were ; Win. 1'. 

I NMimis. W. •). McBeth. .lames Oliver, 
Geo M llawkele, i;. Locke, A. R. Km be 
Bugfa Munn.e. A. K. Mcintosh, Fred B 
Halm. W. .1. Betherington, Toronto ; 
Douglas I.. White Midland, and Will. I'. 
Bull. Hamilton. 



SILVERWARE. 

It will be seen by reference to our ad 
vertisine columns that E. W. Gilmore *v 
Bro., silverware dealers. Toronto, are 
going after the trade with a persistency 
born of success. When asked to what 

their rapid development was due, they re- 
plied that the attractiveness of their 
lines and prices was their winning card. 
The silverware they handle is made bj 
one of the big makers of the United 
States. The American market is so vast 
that the quantity produced of any single 
line reduces the manufacturing cost to 
the lowest possible point. Even with 
duty added. Gilmore & Bro. claim they 
can sell in Canada to the buyers' advan 
tage. Certain it is that their business 
is growing. New patterns in Hat and 
hollowware, and in fancy colored ulass 
berry, pickle and cracker styles, mounted 
in silver, are shown this season. The 

'catalogue' this firm issues ami furnishes 
on request will be found useful and inter- 
est me to hardware dealers everywhere. 



WOVEN WIRE FENCING 

The Cyclone Woven Wire Fence Co., 
Ltd., Toronto, have had a very prosper 
ous season with their farm fence, the 
special features of which are a cable up- 
right instead of a sing-le strand, and a 
spiral steel picket interwoven to increase 
the strength and rigidity. The company 
are manufacturers of a meritorious lawn 
or country fence, and of eates for farm 
use and single walk and lawn gates. 
Both fence and gate have been received 
with much favor and orders are consider 
ably in advance of the stock on hand. 
Hardwaremen would find a ^ood line in 
this eale and fence for another season. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment* 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOREST CITY GOSSIP- 

Office 'of Hardware and Mm il. 
365 Richmond St., London, Ont. 

J 11 j 15, L903. 

WHOLESALE hardware merchants 
are well satisfied with the- business 
done during the first six months 
of this year, and now that a lull is ex- 
petted, they will welcome the leisure time 
instead of feeling badlj about it. Em- 
ployers and' employes have caiiicd a rest. 
The business done has been a great in- 
crease on any former year, but every man 
and clerk has been going at high pressure, 
and an opportunity for recuperation is now 
in order. 

The rolling mills, which, owing to the 
unusually hot weather, were closed down 
for a few days, are again in operation, the 
weather having moderated considerably. 
Since the opening, o( these mills in Lon- 
don this Spring a most satisfactory busi- 
ness has been done. 

Much interest is taken by the hardware 
trade of London in the convention being 
held this week at Gananoque, where 
matters of prime importance will be con- 
sidered. The following prominent gentle- 
men from the Forest City have left for 
that manufacturing centre, and will be in 
attendance at the opening — they will give 
a good account of themselves : Mr. 
Withwam, of The Hobbs Hardware Co.; 
John Bowman, of The John Bowman 
Hardware Co., and 1). H. Howden, of 
D. H. Howden A: Co. 

John McClary, president and general 
manager of The McClary Manufacturing 
Co., is at present in Digby, Nova Scotia, 
where he will spend some weeks enjoying 
the sea breezes of the Bay of Fundy. 

Many of the merchants of London re- 
gret to learn of the death of Charles Grist, 
of Strathroy, a prominent and highly 
esteemed citizen. The deceased was a 
resident of that town for 35 years, and 
during that time was closely identified 
with the mercantile and municipal life of 
the town. Mr. Grist was in the hardware 
business for 21 years. At the time of his 
death he was president of The Strathroy 
Petroleum Co., Limited, and for 10 years 
had held the presidency of The Strathroy 
Manufacturing Co. 

The London Art Glass Works, 392 
Clarence street, this city, are being closed 
up. Mr. Markham, who is owner and 
manager, is moving to Grand Rapids, 
Mich., where he will engage in the same 
line of business. There is a wide field tor 
experts in this class over there. 

The work at the Grand Trunk car shops 
is now so plentiful that the men in the 



Name 



If you want to 
make more money 



Town 



out of the paint business than you are 

making now, ii will pay to use the Coupon 
at the head of this advertisement. 



THE S1IERHIN- WILLIAMS 
CO., Montreal. 

Please send information 
regarding your methods 
for increasing our 
(taint business. 



If you are a SHERWIN-WILLIAMS Agent and 
wish to develop your paint department to a still more 

profitable plane, use the Coupon and let us place you in 
touch with ideas that will help you. 

Ifyouarenot a SHERWIN-W.ILLIAMS Agent, or are not selling 

paint of any kind, use the Coupon and learn of a proposition that will 
increase the profits coming from your general business. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 




CLEVELAND, 
CHICAGO, 
NEW YORK, 



PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

NEWARK, SAN FRANCISCO, MONTREAL, 

BOSTON, LOS ANGELES, TORONTO. 

KANSAS CITY, MINNEAPOLIS, WINNIPEG. 




CANADIAN DIVISION 



HEADQUARTERS, 6 PAINT FACTORY. 

21 St. Antoine Street, Montreal. 

VARNISH FACTORY, 

St. Patrick Street, Montreal. 



TORONTO DEPOT, 

s] York Street. 
WINNIPEG DEPOT, 

147 Bannatyne St., Last. 



carpentering department have been placed 
on extra time, working until 8 o'clock on 
Monday, Wednesday, and Friday even- 
ings. The work is largely repairing to 
cars, and is so heavy that the overtime 
may continue for some weeks. 

E. Leonard & Sons, boilermakers ,V 
machinists, at whose factory there exists at 
present a strike of workmen, have been 
importing foreign workmen to fill the 
places of the strikers. It is said that 
about forty of these men, some of whom 
come from England and Scotland, have 
arrived here. These men, it is alleged, on 
learning of the strike on their arrival here 
refused to go to work. 

The construction of the new system of 
interswilching, to which the G. T. R. 
Company has at last agreed, is giving very 
general satisfaction to the merchants and 
manufacturers of London, and the news- 
papers of this city are printing the expres- 
sion of the opinions of some of the leading 
men who are interested in the change. It 
11 



is understood that it will be built so that 
the M. C. K., C. P. R., L. E. and D.R. 
will all be joined with the G. T. K., and 
the cars from one road can be easily and 
readily transferred to another when neces- 
sary. It will bring many advantages. 



INQUIRIES ABOUT CANADIAN TRADE 

The Following were among the recent 
inquiries relating to Canadian trade 
received by the Canadian Section of the 
Imperial Institute. London, S. W. 

1. A North of England bouse po 

ing a large connection in box shooks and 
excelsior asks to bo placed iii touch with 
Canadian manufacturers of same who can 
fill orders. 

2. A manufacturing firm wishes t () hear 
from Canadian manufacturers <>f ex ten 
sion dining tables. 

.'? A company dealing in teas and cof- 
fees asks to be placed m correspondence 
with Canadian wholesale importers. 

1 \ Bristol firm desires addresses of 
Canadian shippers of seeds, peas, etc. 

Ilie names of the firms making the in- 
quiries can be obtained from the editor 
pi " Hardware and Metal.'' 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




\\ R I hompson, saw and eri~t mill. 
ased. 
of Doherty iV Williamson, 
i .iK I 1. 

Co ol Belleville, aw 
ili. ii plant for -air. 

lumber, etc., Port 
suffered loss bj I'm'. 
\\ p. Stewart a ('•• . harness, etc., 

a, have sold out to F W Clark. 
Claxton & Son, general merchants, 
geville, have sold out to L. Dickeo 
sou. 

|) V Macleod, general merchant. Park- 
hill, has -old liis business to White & 

The a--ots of M.Criininon & Co., gen- 
eral storekeepers, Williamstown, are to be 
sold. 

Tin- estate of -I. D. McRae is advertis- 
ing for sale a saw and grist mill in 
Rganville. 

M Greenspoon lias sueeeeded Green- 
spoon Bros, in general store business, 
Vankleek Hill. 

.1. K. Langlois lias been appointed cura- 
tor to McCrimmon & Co.. general mer- 
chants, Williamstown. 

The assets of the business of Grylls & 
Co., general merchants. Westmeath, were 
put up for sale on July 15. 

Malcolm McCuaip, of the firm of Mc- 
Ouaie, Chenev .\ Co., creneral storekeep- 
er. Vankleek Hill, is deceased. 

The stock of the estate of J. D. Mc- 
Rae, general storekeeper, saw and grist 
miller. EDgansville, is advertised for sale. 

Jones & ("lark, o-eneral merchants, Win 
chelsea, have dissolved partnership ; 
Lavina Jones will continue the business. 

The general store stock of The Gardner- 
Rice McLeod Co.. Limited, Rat Portage, 
is advertised for sale by auction on July 
18 

Bernard Murphy, general merchant, 
l'.rinsville. has assigned to Geo. D. Haw- 
lev : a meeting of the creditors was 
held on duly 11. 

QUEBEC. 

Norbcit Brouillet, saddler. St. Johns, 
i~ deceased. 

I \. Letourneau, sawmill, Ste. Famille 
i deceased. 

James Coooer, railway supplies, etc. 
Montreal, is deceased. 

Bedard & FII-. machinists, St. John-. 
have been registered. 

Tie- Easton Steamboat Co., Ltd.. Que 
In', have obtained a charter. 

Joa IliilieM ,v Lib. general merchants, 
ribv. have registered. 

The assets of \lph Nadeau, carriage 

P a 1 it. St. Geo-;r... are to be -old. 

Monet te & Saumur, contractors, St. 
Martin, have dissolved partnership. 

Beaudrt & C •• . conl ractors, 
Montreal, have dissolved partnership. 

The Coorer-HonVins Supply Co., lid.. 
of Montreal, have been incorporated. 

Hudon & Aupustin, machinists, St. 
Hyacinthe, have dissolved partnership. 



The Iver Johnson Revolvers Have 
Shot Their Way To The Front. 

Absolutely -^ 
Safe. 

Accidental 
discharge is 
impossible. 

absolutely safe, always reliable, ever 
accurate ami true u> aim, are Bharp-shootiug 

qualities of a revolver that no fortress of com- 
petitiou can resist, its i.y employing these 
tactics of skill that 

Iver Johnson Revolvers Have Shot Their Way To The Front. 

Send for Catalog. 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 

New Vork Office : 99 Chambers St. W* FITCHBURG, MASS. 




• I. 0. Bussiere, general merchant, Shaw- 
inigan Falls, has voluntarily assigned. 

The assets of Arthur <.V Cote, general 
merchants, South Durham, are to be 
sold. 

The general store stock of Archille Roy, 
Fortierville, has been sold at 69£c on the 
dollar. 

The assets of 0. Audet, general mer- 
chant, Grondines, are to be sold to-day, 
July 17. 

Ulric Boucher, general merchant, St. 
Barnabe, has sold his stock at (W.'c on 
the dollar. 

E. L. Dionne. general merchant, I'cri- 
bonca, is offering to compromise at 50c. 
on the dollar. 

The assets of the business of S. Z. 
Cote, general merchant, St. Anaclet, 
were sold on July 9. 

J. A. Godbout, general merchant, Lau- 
zon, has sold his stock to J. B. Boutin 
at 48c on the dollar. 

J. D. McHains, has been appointed 
curator for Arthur & Cote, general mer- 
chants. South Durham. 

The assets of P. Blanchette, general 
storekeeper, St. Louise (L'Tslet), are to 
be sold to-day, July 17. 

The assets of H. Hudon & Co., general 
merchants at St. Angele (Rimouski), are 
to be sold on July 22. 

A meeting was called for July !o to 
appoint a curator for W. R. Crepeault & 
Co., general merchants, Kamouraska. 

The stock of S. 'A. Cote, genera] mer- 
chant, St. Anaclet, has been sold at 0!> 
cents on the dollar, to Hudon & Co. 

The following Montreal firms have been 
registered : I). Murphy & Co.. saddlers 

and harness makers ; ('. \arlioniic & Co.. 
contractors; .1. C. Robert & Co., manu- 
facturers' agents and lumber. 

The following Montreal firms have been 
registered : The Paragon Oil Co. ; The 
Phoenix Bridge & lion Works, Ltd. ; W. 

E. Potter iV Co., painters and decorat- 
ors ; and James Price, hide merchant. 

\r.\v BRPXswrcK 

Murray A. Gregory, St. John, lost their 
saw mill bv lire : in urance 823,000, 

The Klein Millin.j Co., Ltd., of Elgin, 
are aorlving for incorporation; capital 
815,000. 

12 



MANITOBA AND NORTHWEST TERRITORIES. 

Sarah Haniford, general merchant, Dau- 
phin, is granted an extension. 

Henry Collins has bought the general 
store of Eph. Roger, Methven. 

The Cement Building Block Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg, have been incorporated. 

The lames Drake Lumber Co., Ltd., 
Winnipeg, have been incorporated. 

James Christie, general merchant, 
(llenella, is sold out to Israel Segal. 

Henry Barton, general merchant, David- 
son, is opening a branch at Girvin. 

A. Mitchell succeeds William Stobart & 
Co., as general merchants at Duck Lake. 

The sheriff is in possession of the gen 
eral store of Beesley & Co., Maple Creek. 

L. Seand, general merchant, New Hope, 
has sold out his business to Michael 
Byers. 

Brodie Ac Stafford, furniture and hard 
ware. Lethbridge, have suffered loss by 
lire ; insured, 

Anthony Ullrich,- agricultural imple- 
ments, Winkler, has been succeeded by 
kricsen & Miller. 

Murray & Walker, hardware. Alameda, 
have dissolved partnership. W. Mm ray 
continues the business. 

The mortgagee is in possession of the 
assets of George Nofield, general stoic 
keeper at Fort Qu 'Appelle, and is offer 
ing them for sale. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Kooteiiay Lumber Co., general store, 
Comaplix, are removing their stock to 
Ducks. 

J. H. Hemsworth succeeds M. V. Finch, 
general storekeeper, Mount Sicker. 

The Slocan Lake Cold and Silver Mine 
Co., Limited. Nelson, are advertising an 
auction sale of mineral claims. 

T. M. Gulley iV Co.. furniture, etc., 
Greenwood, have dissolved partnership. 

A meeting of the creditors of The Baa 
tin'es Shingle Mfg. Co.. Ltd.. Vancouver, 

lias been held. 

The following Vancouver firms have 
been incorporated: Vtzec Mining Co.; 

Limited. Barclay Sound Pump Co.. Lim 
it,.. I. Hunting Lee Lumber Co.. Limited, 
and Park Ranching Co., Limited. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



PIPE WRENCHES. 




37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 



STEAM PIPE i 



WROUGHT IRON PIPE ! * , ' ck \""\ , 

> Galvanized Iron. 



&LJ 




Handy." 



Stlllson s 



PIPE VISES. 
Solid and Hinged. 




Brown's. 



SOLID DIE PLATES. 




* 



3 



BUTTERFIELD 5L CO 

J manu^^^ <^o DERBY LINE VT. <£&> 
u Reeces New Screw Plates s Screw CuttinGi 
Tools in Great Variety. 

no charge for adjustable tap wrenches with our reece plate5. 





PERFECT SCREWS ATA SINGLE CUT 



Bemis & Call Wrenches. 



For a fuller line see our Hardware Catalogue. 



I 



MM II ED 
ONLY 
WHOLE8ALE 



*• 3 



> 




r b 



Drop Forged. 




/*/ 




Pipe Cutter. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. m.m». Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE RIGHT. 



OraHam IMails arts the Best. 

Factory: Dufforln Street, Toronto 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



M«rclw»r*' and 

Mrl.l 



MACHINERY 




Kay Electric Dynamo and Motor Co., Limited 

I Drnunoa un.l Motors for all ]>nr- 
.111.1 alternating ouirente. Special 

OlH.i' ici.l Work*, 219-331 Queen si Beat, Toronto. 

'Phone Main li'.l Estimates oheerfnlb p»en. 



u 



THE PEERLESS" 



is the best Bolster Spring ever produced. A fine 
line for the hardware trade. Write Ui for Price*. 




JAMES WARNOCK & CO., 



GALT, ONT. 




WE STRAP THE WORLD! 



MADE IN POUR WIDTHS. 
1 ._; Inch, ■", Inch, ' 4 inch and 1 inch. 
PATENTED IN ALL COUNTRIES. 



Cary's Universal Box Strap 

A CONTINUOUS Metal Strap with a series of raised bosses along- the edges, to 
strengthen same and protect nail heads. Put up in coils of 300 feet each, and 
packed 20 coils in a case. On each coil we put our patent metal reel frame, making 
it a complete reel. 

E. F. DARTNELL, 180 St. James St. 

BELL TELEPHONE MAIN No. 2382. 



MONTREAL 
HEADQUARTERS 



Fairbanks Power Hammer 



Especially adapted for use in 

Carriage factories, 

Car Sho|)% 

Edge Tool &bo|>s, 
Blacksmith and General Machine Sho|).s. 

All working parts in full view of the operator. 
Every part readily accessable. 

Can be operated by inexperienced men. 

REQUIRES VERY LITTLE POWER. 

These machines are made in different sizes and we carry them 
% in stock at Montreal, and can make immediate shipment. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. INSPECTION INVITED. 

THE FAIRBANKS CO. 




MONTREAL. 



WINNIPEG. 



VANCOUVER. 



14 



Hardware *nd 
Metal 




HOW TO SELECT AND USE OIL STONES. 



IT is generally conceded that one of 
the most important articles in a 
mechanic's kit of tools is a thor 
oughly reliable oil stone, for it is well 
known that in order to do good work a 
mechanic must have keen edged tools and 
must keep them in that condition. It is 
not every mechanic, however, who fully 

understands how to select the best stone 
for the purpose, or, after securing one, 
how to employ it in a way to produce 
tin' most satisfactory results. Bearing 
upon these points are some very timely 
suggestions contained in a little pamph- 
let some time ayo issued by The Pike 
Mfu Co., of Pike Station. N.H. it con- 
tains no much of wilue along the line in- 
dicated thai \\e reproduce herewith their 
comments on the question of selecting 
oil stones and also what they have to say 
in regard to the proper method of using 
them : 

'The first point to be considered in se- 
lecting an oil stone is the purpose for 
which it is required. Many mechanics 
make the common mistake of expecting 
one oil stone to answer all purposes, it 
would be just as reasonable for a car- 
penter to use a coarse tooth saw on fine 
cabinet work as to expect a coarse grain- 
ed, fast cutting oil stone to impart a hue 
razor edge. 

The kind of an edge imparted by a 
stone depends upon the size of its mains 
of grit, or crystals. In a coarse 2'iit 
stone these grains are large, and cut 
deep, far apart furrows in the tool, leav- 
ing a coarse, rough edge. Such stones 
cut away steel faster than a fine grained 
stone (as a coarse tooth saw cuts faster 
than a fine tooth). The coarse edge 
left by such a stone is all right for work 
ing pine or soft woods in which the cells 
are large, but for working hard wood, or 
for anv kind of fine work, the tool should 
be finished on a finer grained stone. 

It is therefore safe to lay down the 
rule that a good mechanic should have 
at least two oil stones, one for grinding 
down dull tools or imparting a coarse 
edge and another for finishing. I here 

are some stones of medium grit which 
answer well for many purposes, but they 

cannot cut as rapidly as tin* coarse stc 

nor impart so smooth an edge as the 
fine. A. carefully selected Washita stone 
is the best general purpose oil stone for 
all around use. 



The hardness of ;l n oil stone i al u 

important factor- in determining its cutl 
ing qualities. For sharpening ordinary 
tools with broai I blades or edges a mi 
dium soft, fast wearing stone should be 

chosen. For sharpening narrow chisels. 
engravers' tools or pointed instruments, 
however, ii is aecessarj to use a very 

hard stone, as otherwise the lone will 
soon be cut full of grooves or furrows. 

Regarding the proper use of oil stones, 

the pamphlet contains the following : 

In the first place, it should lie borne in 
mind that a good oil stone can be ruined 
by improper usage or lack of care. Many 
stones are condemned when the fault lies 
either in not having selected the right 
st. me for the work or in not having tak 
en proper care of it. The mechanic who 
expects one oil stone to grind down his 
dull nicked tools and at the same time 
impart a keen, razor edge, using any 
kind of oil that happens to be at hand, 
leaving the dirty oil on the stone to dry 
in. Leaving his stone around in the dust 
and dirt of tin- shop, will never have a 
good oil stone and does not deserve one. 

No sensible carpenter will think of us- 
ing other tools in Chis way, yet many of 
them treat their oil stones in just this 
manner. Many time's have we seen oil 
stones returned to dealers with the com- 
plaint that they would not "cut," when, 
as a matter of fact, they were completely 
coated or varnished with dried, dirty oil 
and steel dust, in such a manner that 
the tool could not possibly come in con- 
tact with the grit or "teeth" of the 
stone. 

There are three objects to lie attained 
in using and caring for an oil stone : 
First, to retain the original life and 
sharpness of its grit ; second, to keep 
its surface Hal and even : third, to pre- 
vent its glazing. 

To retain the original freshness of a 
stone, it should be kept clean and moist. 
To let an oil stone remain dry a long 
thne or expose it to the air tends to 
harden it. A new stone should lie soak- 
ed in oil for- several days before using, 
and if kept in a dry place (most of them 
are) it should be kept in a box with 
closed cover and a few drops of fresh 
clean oil left on it. 

To keep the surface of an oil stone Hat 

and even simply requires care in using. 

Tools should be sharpened on the»,edge of 

15 



the Btc I as in 1 Lddle, to 

prevent Weal n Bgh shaped ,|. 

uon. It i in to prevent a 

lone becoming Ii 'htlj hollowed from 
■ ■■ . but tin i .in be remedied by 
gi indii tone on the side oi a grind 

stone, or rubbing it down with 
stone or an emerj In - 

To prevent a n oil tzing i I,, 

first understand what i -tone 

laze. Tin plained by 

I by oil and water are used on 

sharpi and how they should 

be used. 

The words "oil stone" have come to be 
applied to all stones u barpening 

mechanics' tools, "from the fact that it is 
necessary to use oil on most of them for 
two purposes : First, to prevent the 
stone from beating the tool, which draws 
its temper and ruins the best tool in- 
stantly; second, to keep the particles of 
steel ground off the tool from eni 
(In- pores of the stone, which would soon 
fill (hem up and cause a glazed surface. 

Most coarse grained and all soft I 
can be used successfully with water, al- 
though they may be generally termed oil 
atones. (hi such stones water should be 
used plentifully to carry olT the powder 
rubbed up by the tool. Host ■ 

stones are quick cutting and leave a 
coarse edge, but a much liner edge can 
be procured on the same stone by 
just enough water or oil to rub up a 
paste. This paste when kept on the 
stone will eive a finishing edge, but 
should be thoroughly cleaned oil before 
putting the stone away. 

Fine grained, hard stones, like the 
Washita, Arkansas and Turkey, should 
always be used with oil, as water is not 
thick enough to keep the steel out of 
the pores. The dirty oil should always 

be wiped off the stone tli i-hly as 

soon as possible after using it. This is 
very important, for if left on the stone 
the oil dries in, carrying the steel dust 
with it. and thus soon causes the stone 
to "laze: Cotton waste is one of the 
best things to clean a stone with and 
is nearly always to be found in a slum. 
Some carpenters use shavings, but they 
are very apt to leave the stone full of 
dust. A common clean rag would be 

bet tel'. 

I he ( p.u. ha\ e , w . i, -,t y pow- 
erful compound locomotives from The 
North British Locomotive Co., of I 
gow. 



. 



V 

\ 



Hardware and 



MACHINERY 



MACHINERY AND ELECTRICAL NOTES. 



BOUNTY HELPS COLLINGWOOD 



WORK on the cream separator fac 
tory nt Durham, Out., is pro 
• • K The boiler w as 
(nit in Tuesday and the brick work will 
shortly. \s Boon as the roof 
upleted and Hour laid, the machinery 
will be installed, Jn u few weeks everj 
thiiiLT will be completed. 
B H, il ,v Son, Ltd., of Oalt, Ont., 
hipped a carload of implements 
to foreign lands. 

I In- town of Palmerston, Ont., has 
adopted municipal ownership of the 
electric light plant. The town also con- 
templates installing a waterworks plant. 
It is stated that tlie Grand Trunk will 
construct this winter, in the shops at 
Montreal, fifteen new engines of most 
modern type, for passenger service on 
their western division. 

The American Abel! Engine iV Thresher 
Co., Ltd., of Toronto. Ont., shipped on 
Saturday last seven ears of their thresh- 
ing outfits to Winnipeg, where they are 
to arrive for exhibition week, 

Preparations are being made for the 
construction of a wire and nail factory 
in Collingwood, Ont. The site chosen is 
located just west of The Cramp Steel 
Co., along the line of the Grand Trunk 
Railway. 

■ I v \ M Cote, of St. Hyacinthe, 
Que., manufacturers of the "Yamaska" 
brand of boots and shoes, are rebuilding 
their factory. which was burned last 
May. They will equip it with the most 
modern machinery. 

Preparations are being made for the 
erection of the projected foundry and 
machine shop a t Collingwood, Ont., Brick 
and steel are being placed on the "rounds 
and building will be commenced immedi- 
ately. 

The Andover & Perth Electric Light 
commissioners are asking for tenders for 
the installation of an electric light plant 
for the villages of Andover and Perth, N. 

B. Tenders will be received by ('. H. 

Elliott, Andover, N.H.. up to -July 25. 

In. Brazing Co. of Canada, Ltd., 
Guerph, Ont.. have been incorporated 
with a capital of J 1,000 to manufacture, 
deal in. solder and repair iron, steel and 
other metals. The directors are : A. G. 
Spencer, W. C. Adam-. -I. H. Bell, W. S: 
Johnstone and E. M. Rri<_"_>-. all of Mont- 
real. 

The Jencks Machine Co., of Sherbrooke, 
Que., have signed a contrail with The 
Ontario Power Co., of Niagara Falls, 
Ont., and construction work on a big 
Steel conduit will be commenced 
..oil It U expected that 30d men will 
be em-ployed and shantief for their ac- 
commodation will be erected near the 

\ ieW 



(!. M. Botsworth, fourth vice president 
at the (PR. is of the opinion that the 
lead bounty will have the effect of great- 
lv increasing the production of British 
Columbia. He characterizes as absurd 
I he story that the railways will absorb 
the bounty by charging increased rates. 
It is to the railways' interest, he says, 
io develop the mines. 

The Tavistock Malleable Iron Co., Ltd., 
of Tavistock, Out., have been incorporat- 
ed with a capital of §100,000 to manu- 
facture and deal in all kiwis of malleable 
and grey iron, and iron castings. The 
directors are : Fred Krug, Valentine 
Stock. A. !•'.. Rat/, George Staebler, 
John Kalblleisch. Allan Steckle and Phil 
ip Her old, all of Tavistock, Ont. ; 
Richard Corcoran and W. F. Rat/,, both 
of Port Huron. Michigan. 

The Canada Foundry Co., Toronto, 
Out., have recently received an order 
from the C.'P.R. for the construction by 
September, 11)04, of ten compound, ten- 
wheel, consolidation engines. Their 
weight will be 164,000 pounds, with 
114,800 on the drivers, which are to be 
57 inches in diameter. The tender is to 
have a capacity for water of 5,000 gal- 
lons, and for coal of ten tons. The Cau- 
ada Foundry Co. are very busy at pres- 
ent overtaking orders. 

F. H. Clergue expresses himself as well 
pleased with the decision of the Dominion 
Government to aid the iron and steel in- 
dustries by the payment of bounties. 
" All the blast furnaces and steel works 
in Ontario, as well as in Quebec and 
Nova Scotia." he says, ''will enjoy the 
new assistance, and by it will be firmly 
established on a substantial and perma- 
nent basis.'' Mr. ClergUe also stated 
that the blast furnaces and rail mills at 
the Soo are ready for operation, with a 
present capacity of 150,000 tons per year, 
which is considerably more than any 
possible requirements of the Grand Trunk 
Pacific." 

The Canadian Westinghouse Co.. Ltd., 
Hamilton, Out., have been incorporated 
with a capital of §2,5(10,000 to manufac- 
ture and deal in all kinds of machinery, 
machines, a': uatus. fixtures, engines, 
motors, air brakes, etc. ; to carry on the 
business of manufacturers and dealers in 
electrical and general machinery ; and to 
undertake contracts for works involving 
the supply or use of electrical or other 
machinery, or electrical or other power ; 
to acquire or construct factories, shops, 
mills, engine houses, etc., necessary for 
the carrying out of any of the purposes 
of the company. The directors are : If. 
11. Westinghouse, New York, \. Y. ; Geo. 
Westinghouse, G. ('. Smith. P. H. Tay- 
lor, L. A. Osborne of Pittsburg, Penn. : 
Thomas A hern and W. Y. So| it, Ottawa; 
and ' .1 Mvles of Hamilton. Out. 

Ifl 



T 



r^HK new steel bounties are certain to 
help the steel iuduslrv at Colliilg 
wood, Ontario, to a very consider 
able extent, and, naturally, considerable 
elation is manifested by the officials of 
The Cramp Steel Co. The subsidy 
granted on wire rods is particularly 
gratifying. It is estimated that this 
subsidy will mean an increased profit of 
about §500 daily on the company's out- 
put. When the finishing mills were de- 
signed, fchej were planned so that wire 
rods could be rolled as well as bars. The 
semi-continuous system in vogue in the 
German and Belgian mills was adopted 
so that mills could be run on bars until 
such time as it would be profitable to 
mil rods. The Dominion bounties now 
make it possible to loll rods at a good 
profit, and hence a large proportion of 
the output of the company's mills will 
be wire rods. The mills arc now com 
pleted except for the installation of an 
engine, which is building in Toronto. 

The Imperial Steel and Wire Co. are 
erecting a large wire-drawing plant on 
land adjoining the works of The Cramp 
Steel Co. Work is being rushed on tins 
wire plant, which will have a capacity of 
50 tons of wire daily. The wire rods 
will be obtained from Tin- Cramp Steel 
Co.. which is thus assured of a conven 
lent market. 



SYRACUSE BABBIT IN DEMAND 

The Syracuse Smelting Works, Mont 
real, Canada. have lately received an 
order for 1>0 tons of high-grade babbit 
metal from the forges! manufacturer in 
Canada. They are also turning out for 
exportation very large orders for babbit 
metal, linotype and stereoty] e metal. 
We understand they employ about 00 
men. who are kept busy day and night 
turning out rush orders. 



WILSON SCALE WORKS 

C. Wilson & Son. Limited, scale manu- 
facturers, Toronto, whose premises were 
recently visited by (ire, report that the 
fire did not cause any delay beyond two 
or three da.vs. Only the foundry connect 
ed with the scale works suffered. Within 
three days another foundry was engaged 
and work went on as usual. The com 
pany will now erect a larger and more 
modern foundry on the site of the cud 
one, and plans for its erection are about 
completed. Tn the scale department a 
new platform 2,0(1(1 lb. scale, called the 
" King Edward," has been a great sel- 
ler. In large scales recent installations 
have been one at the Ontario Parliament 
buildings and a lav scale at Toronto 
■ ) unci ion. 



We il«> mi' Mi-iiM to In- 
sinuate thai you are bald 
beaded, bul it you an 
aixl wish in advert iae I he 
t;i< i , out .hi onal t rub- 
ber stamps will i»i' ive .1 
luxury; you will tnfel I hal 
i iir.v prinl equally well on 
uny uneven surface; tliis 
will go .1 long waj i" ahow 
tluit your head is level. 
\W invite difficult iteel 
stamp work, and try Co 
please our customers, 
EEave you got one of oui 
i .1 1 .1 1 igues '.' 



Hamilton 
Stamp & 

St.) cil 
Works, 

Hamilton, Ont. 




A^ 



\ 



MACHINERY 



Hard-ware ind 

Meul 



BARGAINS IN MACHINERY. 

(See change ih'xi issue). 
WOOD WORKING MACHINES. 

26, 30, S3 and 36 iii. Kami Saw Machines, New 

in in Band Ete saw, NVu 

36 in. Circular Re-saw. 

12 in Buzz Planers, New. 

12 in Pony Planers, New. 

24 in Pony Planers, New, 

2t in. Planers and afatohei 

24 in. Endless Bed Planer. 

24 in Hi'nv]' Planer and Smoother, New. 

Iron Km Swing (Jut <ilf Saws, New. 

Waterous Two Saw Trimmer, New, 

Dyment, Butterfleld Double Edgi i 
AUTOMATIC ENGINES. 

8 x 24 Wneelock. 

15 \ 84 Wheelook. 

11 \ 24 Corliss. New. 
11x10 ideal High Speed. 
in \ 10 Peerless Sell Oiling 
70 H. 1*. Osborne Kelly Compound. 
8 to 65 H. P. Jewel Engines, New. 
TK LOTION ENGINE. 

16 H. P. Russel .x Co, 

Descriptions and Catalogue of Supplies sum 
the asking. 

H. W. PETRIE 

131-145 Front St. West, 8-22 Station St.. Toronto. 




BUY 

KERR 

VALVES. 

They give 
satisfaction 
every time, 



Catalogue 
on application. 



TheKerr Engine Co. 



Walkervllle, Ont, 




^C.1 



Blacksmith' 



Drills. 

The very 
best. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



"Say, friend," 



your aim should be to start up for yourself. 

Why Work 

from morn till night lor somebody else instead of 
pushing a business for yourself and thus reap the full 
profit of your labor ? 

We Will 

start men of ability and good character in every 
County in the Dominion. 



WRITE FOR PARTICULARS TO 



The Empire Machine and Metal Stamping Co. 

1012 Yonge St. - TORONTO, 



i 1 1 i 



USE 



CANADIAN BABBIT 



Imperial 
Metallic 



Hercules 
Star 



The highest grade babbits made. 

THE CANADA METAL CO., "."MY' TORONTO. 

COLD PRESSED NUTS 



of all shapes and sizes, finished, semi- 
finished, case hardened, plated or 
polished. 



Canada Foundry Company, Limited, 

14-16 King Street East, - - TORONTO, 





CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 




ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST 



R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. ^^SVZf.l: 55 Ch ™ bera 



17 



Hardware and 

M«M»1 



DEPARTMENT OF ADVERTISING 
SUGGESTION AND CRITICISM 



id practiei of advertising Subscribers an Invited to send Mr, l.yduitt specimens 
ulvertising, for ilu- purpose ol reviev In this department Address ears "f Department of Advertia- 



Edited by 

W. Arthur 
Lydiatt, 

TORONTO. 



When Your Story is Well Told tKe Goods are Half Sold. 



II has been said thai »>■ should write 
an ii.Kn ii>.'inont just the same as 
we would talk to a customer over the 
counter that it is practically the Bame 
But this is not always the case. 

When we get a customer to the counter 
we already have their attention, and we 
know to a certainty that what we are 
.join:: to say will he listened to, and 
that if one argument fails to impress we 
have the means of bringing other argu 
ments to the customer's attention. 

lint in the ease of an advertisement in 
the newspaper we must say something 
that will command attention. It must be 
something which sticks out and catches 
the eve ami the mind of the casual 
reader. 

Alter you have secured the reader's at- 
tention you can talk in the ordinary 
con.mon-sense way, just about the same 
as you would to someone at your side ; 
but, until you have attracted the people's 
attention, your talking in a moderate 
type is not always sure to attract at- 
tention and draw trade. 

Therefore, while the real value and sel 
ling qualities of an advertisement may 
lie in the body matter, still the eye- 
catching qualities lie almost entirely in 



1 1 i>- this : • Break the news first, explain 
afterwards." 
I've seen so many ads. in which a long 



DID YOU SEE 
OUR 

June Wedding Gifts 

Bud) as 

1847 Roger Bros,' 
Sliver Plated 

Pie Knives, 

Fruit Spoons, 

Soup Ladles, 
Sugar Shells, 

Butter Knives, 

Pickle Forks 
> 

Also a beautiful line of 

Nickel Tea Pots. 
Nickel Coffee Pots, 
Hot Water Kettles, 
Brass Banquet Lamps 

AND 

Hanging Lamps. 

Last, l>ut not least 

A "HAPPY THOUGHT RANGE." 



H. H. OTTON & SON 

Fivb Points Hardware Store. 

Phone 123. 



like the man who puis a n.onkey in his 
window, or sends one of those freaks 
through the streets on stilts, or in the 
guise of a country guy with a carpet 
bag sign reading " I'm going to Blank's." 

The ingenuity of the compositor is en- 
tirely exhausted— the variety of styles of 
type is run to the limit— in the effort to 
satisfy this man's desire for novelty. 

In a letter from a correspondent <>f 
this department received last week, he 
remarks : " Don't you think if you'd at 
range the bodv of your ads. with different 
styles of type they'd be more attrac- 
tive ?" 

No, I don't think so. 1 believe in 
simplicity of typography. 

M:ui\ an advertisement loses n.ost of 
its force because too much of the 
reader's mental power is required in get- 
ting "through the " type thickets." 

The average reader is not an easy 
reader, therefore, the effort should be to 
invite him by extreme legibility. Have 
the ad. set so as to cause the reader the 
least possible effort to digest its con- 
tents. 

Avoid ornamentation ; use borders only 
for the sake of securing contrast ; head- 
lines, as an aid to the reader, or, as a 



ii»n ii nm i nnnniii i i i n ii n i> mm ii n 



II Hammocks 



Have You Seen Those We Are Showing? i 

I I 

; |They are the Best Value in Town:; 

' Bought direct from the Largest Maker in the i i 

! . United State- They are the Latest Patterns. ', 

Prices range from 75c. to S4.25. Come in and 

see them even If you don't buy. 

1 For the Hot Weather you'll need a 

1 • 

; Refrigerator, a Gas, Gasoline or;; 

Oil StOVe, and an Ice Cream Freezer. 
Our Stock is complete In these lines. 

Anothf ihipment oftho.r CKripbul Good Lawn Monfc ha 
ifTiurd 1 hey wont Uti lon^ 

H. H. OTTON & SON, 

Five Points Hardware Store!! 



»«»«»«»»•«■»»«■■»»»»»■•■■■»■»»•««■»»>■»»»■<■«) 



the display which is used, and we must 
eaten the eye to Becure the' attention. 
I have a favorite maxim, which I think 
1. rood advice in this connection. 



preliminary explanation was gone into 
in order to " lead up" to the point. 

The best ads. tell as much as possible 
of their story in the first sentence. This 
is calculated to create a desire for par- 
ticulars, which should be found in the 

explanation" immediately following. 

It is the first mission of an advertise- 
ment to be seen. Its greatest mission, 
of course', is to convince, but before an 
ad. can Liet the chance to convince, or 
convey any message whatever, it must 
be seen by the reader tor whom it is in 
tended. 

Therefore, the display is very impor- 
lant. Tin headline should be such as 
would be calculated to attract those per- 
sons who might be interested in the 
article or articles advertised. When pos 
sible make the headline " break the 
news." 

Some advertisers spend too much 
energy in trying to attract attention, 
18 



HAVE YOU SEEN 
THOSE HAMMOCKS 

we are showing'/ They are the best value in 
town. Bought direct from the largest maker 
in the United States. 
- They are the latest patterns. 

Prices range from 75c. to Si 26. 

Cume in and see them eVen if you don't imy. 

For the hot weather you'll need a Refrigera 
tor. a Gas, Gasoline or Oil .Stove, and an Ice 
Cream Freezer. 

Our stock in t hese inns is complete 

Another shipment of those cheap but good 
Lawn Mowers has arrived. They won't Inst 
long 



n. n. OTTON £* SON 

Five Points Hardware Store 
Phone 123 



summary* <>f the thought to follow; cuts, 
only when they save a lengthy descrip- 
tion or better describe the goods. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



In sending me the ads which are re 
produced (his week Otton .\ Son remark 
"These ads were written quickly." Chej 
nave thai apjpearanoe, and ii also serins 
e-videnl thai the compositor set, them in 
type in a hurry, whether necessitated bj 

lack of tin lark of ability to propel 

ly set up an ad, I cannot 

Mont write your ails in a hurry when 
you can help it. It doesn't pay. 

The real value of advertising lies In (he 
w ay in w hich i t is done. 

So that the value you get for the 
money you pay the newspaper foj advei 
t*sine depends almost entirely on what 
you put in (he space. 

The main fault with these ails is that 
thej try to advertise too many different 
things. It is quite a common fault with 
the hardware dealers' ads I see 

It is always better to advertise one 
thine at a time, or perhaps two, for it 
i- always easier to make a definite im- 
pression on the mind of (he public by 
focusing their attention on one. or two. 
articles. 

Tf i( is necessar\ to advertise a number 
of articles at the same time, as is often 
the case in the smaller towns where the 
paper is only issued once a week, onp 
ought to give more attention to the dis 
i -lav of the ad, arranging the comment, 
or description of the different articles 
something after the style Followed by the 
department stores in the larger cities. 
This divides the ad un into several small 
•els. hut serves to bring your goods to 
the reader's attention one at a time. 

Simplicity in display is especially de- 
sirable. Over displav, such as is illus- 
(rated l>v these ads reproduced, only 
tends to confuse the mind of the reader. 
K reminds me of a lot of people trying 
(o talk to one person at once, and the 
consequent impression on that person's 
mind . 

Without making any effort (o re -write 
the ad. T have illustrated how easily one 
of these ads. could have been made more 
effective by simple display. 



ADVICE TO BOYS AND YOUNG MEN ENTERING 

BUSINESS. 



PERSONAL MENTION 

Mr. John Cameron, who has for many 
years bsen so well known to the trade in 
Canada on account of his connection" 
with the advertising staff of " Hardware 
and Metal." left a few days asfo for a 
holiday trip to Great Britain. He is ac- 
companied by Mrs. Cameron. No doubt 
the good wishes of the trade will accom- 
pany him. It is to be hoped that he will 
return to Canada much benefitted by his 
trip and fortified for many more years of 
hard and successful work. 

' The almost weekly buro-laries at the 
rubber works at Port Dalhousie have 

culminated in the capture of a man 
secreted on the premises at midnight of 

Tuesday, July 1 I. 



r l~* HE average lioj Rtarting out into 
business life does not appn 
t he importance and seriou i 

lep he I- l.il in) I h' failure of 

many mav be due to I 1 

A. Shaw, in Hardware If thej an 

Mm lie or urn - enough 

ated where* attention to business and ac 

curacj makes no difference, thej 

drift alone until thej commence to think 

for themselves and realize that their sue 

cess depends entirely upon their owe 

forts. A boy's future should not depend 
upon luck or chance, however, lint upon 
the solid foundation of* a proper start 
and a thorough realization of his posi 

t ion ; W hat is expected of In in i ml t he 

reward in store for him for the successful 
accomplishment of his work. 

Too many start out blindly. They 
n't an\ idea as (o what (hey want 
or are aiming for. but drift along in a 
haphazard wav. thinking more of their 
Salary at the end of the week than the 
sueeess of their work. 

Tf a boy could commence business life 
with even a small portion of the judg 
ment and common sense he enjoys later 
on. how differently he would act. As tie 
cannot start that way. however, with his 
own know led,.,., win not profit by (hat 
of others and benefit by the observation 

of those who have learned by experience 
and can give such advice as will do much 

: ,1. and perhaps assist in his su, 

Tn the first place, too many boys in en 
terino- into business fail to realize the 
dignity of their new life, but cling to 
their boyishness and school boy pranks, 
which seriously interfere with their work 
and are a handicap to their own SUCi 
Such foolishness will not be tolerated in 
business, and the sooner a bov learns it. 
(he better for himself and employer. I( 
isn't necessary for him to assume the air 
of an old man ; but (hat he attend to 
his work during business hours and for 
net the time-wasting and useless 11011 

-,, mam bot - are guilty of. 

Business men want people around (hem 
that will attend strictly to business, and 
if a bov cannot start out on (hat basis 
he had better not commence until he 
knows he can. A boy starting at the 
bottom, as he should in order to Si 
a good foundation. is liable to think 
l hat he does not cut much figure in the 

i ess of the business, and so allows 
those duties for which he is responsible 
to remain undone or drag along in a 
slip-shod manner. He could not make a 
greater mistake ; he must do all that is 
given him to do in the most accurate, 
prompt and gentlemanly wav nossibl ■ 
Tf in doubt, he should ask for informa 
tion lather than make an error, but lo] 
the development of his own mind he 
10 



lid nol I an, e in, ' 

-lire ire out the 

re, t h Not ,,nl\ should he perform hi 
own duties promptly and well, but he 
should not be ah aid t,, do a lit i le more 
than is expected of him. I 
'I.. |] thesi things, 1 hough t le 

think they do nol. and if one 
shirks his ow n w ■ i ■ m unw i 1 1 1 1 1 — 

P. ,1,. mori than hi- own. he letard 
•■tion if he ,1 his po-i 

I I, ,n. 

-mall and uniinpoi taut al i he tai I . but 
they must l„ done to the best of his 
ability, for mile-- he prove himself com 
little things, he 
will not be trusted with the more im 

n( position- and work. Every boy 
should do all his work at least a 

lilt le bet ter i haii anyone el . n hould 
give i( thought, figure out how he can 

Save tune and in,,n,\ for the firm and yet 
improve (he character of the work done. 

thereby making himself necessary to hie 
employers and his im aluable. 

lie should stud) economj in the trai 

tion of thai p.ut of the linn's business 

ii, i looking after, and try to find short 

cut ii i I of doing certain work that 

will serve the purpose, bu1 save time and 
Suggestions are alwavs in o 

lie must always be in his place of busi 
ness on or before the lime expected, and 
if sickness or anything makes him late 

he should immediately explain it to h'i- 

employer. Dunn- the day he should not. 
watch the clock. It is time enough to 
go home or think of it when his work. is 
all done. If he run- out of duties he 
should look for more. The more he can 
do and do well, just so much more 
he increase his knowledge of (lie bu.-iue--, 

responsibility and value to (he empli 

as well as fit himself for larger and more 

impoi taut du i 

l)<> not think, my boy. that if you do 
that and (hereby prove your ambition 
and interest in the welfare of your em- 
ploy er that it will not be noticed and 
rewarded when a bettei position Oi 

for it will. We want bright, ambition- 
boys around US, prepared by theil 
perience in the humbler positions to (ill 
higher ones as thej become vacant. If 
you have been doine- your work well and 

shown J • desire to advance by learn 

inn all you can about the work higher 
up, v'OU are just (he one we want to 
into the -hoe- of ili, fellow who is leav 
inn t,, better himself or has not done his 
best and so compels us to eive you the 
position, which you have shown you de 
serve by hard work, attention to bu-i 
ness and accuracy. We would greatlj 

prefer having you take the place. for we 

know you and you have demonstrated 
your value, while at the same time it 
ii- t he annOJ anne of bi in an 

entire stranger mid teaching him manv 
of the things you should know about if 
v on have kept your eve- open. We do 

not want boys who am not ambitious 
and capable of filling the better positions 
after proper training and elopment ; 

but we do want and insist upon having 
in the lower places bright, wide-awake 
boys to fill better places in case of ne 

I v. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The celebrated NATIONAL CUTLERY CO. 

make three different styles of tailors' shears, 
viz., A.B. and C, in all sizes with nickel-plated 
blades and brass bolt. After almost half a 




century manufacturing only high-grade shears, 
we are prepared to offer to the much appre- 
ciated and intelligent tailor, a shear which we 
claim has no equal for perfect finish, easy 
working, and is the only shear made to-day 
with the solid steel ride. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 



DECATUR, BULL & CO., 

SOLE CANADIAN AGENTS, 

Montreal, Que. 



. I - 





<7R» 


(Js^r 


The 


jW^ 


Russwin 


1 aN> 


Food 


*J \ 


Cutter. 


Stands High from the Table. 

Gutter Below the Case Carries all Juices to the Dish. 
Self-Sharpening Knives. 

Case-Hardened Steel Cutters. 

Hinged Case — Opening Flat. 

All Parts Accessible for Cleaning. 


Russell & Erwm Mfg. Co. 

New Britain, Conn. 




"Sunshine" Furnace. 



The most successful hot air furnace in Canada. 

Built to burn all kinds of fuel successfully. 

Large double feed doors admit rough chunks 
of wood and make it an easy furnace to feed with 
coal. 

All parts exposed to fire and wear are made 
extra heavy. 

Never gives any trouble after being properly 
installed. 

If your customers are dissatisfied with your 
present line write for catalogue and complete in- 
formation on the "Sunshine." 

Extensively advertised from Halifax to 
Vancouver. 



The McClary Mfg. Co. 

LONDON, TORONTO, MONTREAL, WINNIPEG, 

VANCOUVER AND ST. JOHN, N. B. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN, 

Montreal. 

""• Maclean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES, 



MONTRF.AL 



Toronto 



232 McGill Street. 

Telephone 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephones 2701 and 2702. 

LONDON, Eng. - - ioq Fleet Street, K.C. 

Manchester, Eng. - 18 St. Ann Street. 

H S. Ashburner. 

LONDON, ONT. - - - Hiscox Building. 

Walter H. Lindsay. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 
New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
WINNIPEG, Man. - 377 Cumberland Ave. 

D. J. Benham. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address | A ^ scri P!' London. 
I Adscript, Canada. 

JUDGMENT IN BUSINESS. 

We only want what we want ; somebody else 
may want the rest ; we don't ! 

THE above epigrammatic reply was 
given over the 'phone by the manager 
of one of the largest wholesale houses in 
the Dominion a few days ago. It is 
worthy of note as being characteristic of 
the man and a good criterion of a quality 
which has contributed largely to his 
success. 



purchase a line of goods which he did 
not think desirable. His reply was ex- 
ceedingly good-natured, but he had gone 
into the matter fully, and there was a 
tone of decision and finality which con- 
vinced the salesman that further argument 
was useless. 

That "goods well bought are half sold " 
is indisputable. The ability and will- 
power necessary to buy right, to accept 
only what is wanted by one's trade, makes 
all the difference between success in some 
men and comparative failure in others. 
These qualities are, therefore, to be sought 
for, to be eagerly desired by every mer- 
chant. To be well equipped in this re- 
gard entails a good knowledge of the 
hardware business, of 1 lie preferences 



EDITORIAL 

and needs of the dealer's own locality, 

I lu more thorough the knowledge, (he 

more decisive and coin. I will be the 

reply to salesmen. 

There is danger, however, in substitut- 
ing prejudice foi judgment. Man) mer- 
chants take dislikes to certain houses and 
even to certain articles, nol because of anj 
real inferiority, but for some ulterioi rea- 
son. Their customers may desire to bin 
these articles, but the merchant is decisive 

in his refusal to Stock them, with the re- 
sult thai the customers seek them else- 
where. Decision is a most desirable 
quality to possess, yet it should nol be 
exercised too hastily. If a salesman has 
a new line to show he should be given a 
fair hearing. Then the merchant should 
have sufficient knowledge of the require- 
ments of his trade and decision of charac- 
ter to give his answer finally, decisively, 
yet ever with good nature. 



ARBITRATION IN NEW ZEALAND. 

WHILE labor disputes claim so much 
of our attention in Canada, it is 
of interest to note the progress of such dis- 
putes in other countries and the methods 
which are there employed to solve the 
knotty problems which are continually 
arising. It is well known that in our 
sister colony of New Zealand the remedy 
employed is compulsory arbitration. The 
unions of employers and employed are 
incorporated, and all labor disputes are 
subject to the decision of an arbitration 
court. Many of us may be inclined to be 
sceptical as to the efficacy of this much- 
vaunted remedy. It is of interest, there- 
fore, to note the practical working of the 
scheme and in particular a recent decision 
of the Arbitration Court, which is attract- 
ing wide attention in the island colony, 

Some time ago the Arbitration Court, 
at the instance of the workmen, decided 
that the rate of wages in the furniture 
factories in Auckland must be increased 
from Is Id to Is 3d per hour. The Cana- 
dian reader will be interested to know (he 
result. Two firms affected by this de- 
cision granted the increase to the majority 
of their more capable workmen, but thev 
decided that thev could not giant il to all. 

Now there is a clause in the act which 
provides for the wage of inferior workmen, 
21 



II .it ,1 wnrr and 
M.-...I 



Men who are Considered unable lo, .in 

' hi- minimum wage, shall be paid Buch 

lesser sum as shall he decided upon bv tin 

foreman and a member of the union em- 
ployed in sin h shop where the question is 
raised, and if they cannot agree, then by 

an OUtSlde party, who shall In- inuliiallv 
agreed upon bv hoi li sides." Rul as will 
be noted the decision of the union thai 
these men .no inferior woiknieii is abso- 
lutely essential. In this particular casi 
the union decided (hat the workmen in 

question were noi inferior. The em- 
ployers would willing)} have engaged 

them al a less wage than Is lid per hour, 
but this could nol be done in view of the 
union's decision thai they were nol in- 
terior workmen. Thev were accordingly 
discharged and I heir pla.es vveienol Idled. 

Against Ibis action the union protested, 
strongly claiming thai it was a violation 
ol the terms of the award. The appeal 
was carefully considered by the Arbitra- 
tion Coufl and il was decided that no 
breach of the award had been committed. 

It may be unsafe al this distance lo 
jump at conclusions, but it would seerfl 
that this decision must, to a great extent, 
render nugatory the whole machineiv of 
COnpulsory arbitration. It would appear 
that employers dissatisfied with an award 
may at any lime escape its irksome pro- 
visions by saying that they have no longer 
need of their employes, or certain- of 
them, or that they are undeserving of the 
minimum wage. 

Naturally ibis decision has created quite 

a stir among the industrial classes of New 
/.aland. Open distrust of the arbitration 
tribunal has been expressed by the labor 
organs and the Premier has expressed dis- 
satisfaction with the turn which events 
have taken. The indications are dial this 
much-amended Act will be still further 
amended in the near future. Compulson 
industrial arbitration is still in the experi- 
mental Stage, but the study of its pro; 
in New Zealand cannot fail lo be of profit 
lo us in Canada. If we are nol prepared 
to follow New Zealand in her novel experi- 
ments, we can with profit to ourselves 
watch their results. A scheme which 
may seem sound theoretically may yet be 
unsatisfactory in its practical working. 



H » re! were and 

Mci.i 



EDITORIAL 



DISCRIMINATION AGAINST CANADIAN GOODS. 



^T^RADE with South Africa has received 
JL considerable attention from Canadian 
exporters during the past few years, and 
the action of the Federal Government in 
subsidizing a steamship service, from Can- 
ada to Cape Town and Durban is in line 
with a progressive policy only too neces- 
relop a trade that was becoming 
practically monopolized by our friends to 
the south. 

When the Government entered into the 
subsidy agreement with the Furness-Withy 
line o\ steamships plying between Mont- 
treal and South Africa it was naturally as- 
sumed that the movement was started 

with the view o( encouraging Canadian 
manufacturers and shippers. It was to 
In- reckoned with that American shippers 
would in all likelihood take advantageof 
the line as well, owing to their ability to 
secure low inland rates to Montreal, and 
ome of th e most prominent western firms 
have not been slow to take advantage of 
the opportunity afforded them ; but it is 
somewhat startling to learn that a dis- 
crimination in favor of American shippers 
i> manifested by the subsidized steamship 
company. 

Our attention was called the other day 
to what seems to us to be an unjust par- 
tiality shown an American concern recently 
gainst one of the largest Canadian 
packers in Montreal in the loading of 
freight for South African ports. The last 
steamer leaving was the Wyandotte, and 
it seems that The Laing Packing Co. of 
Montreal, who arc amongst the most pro- 
gressive exporters of Canadian dressed 
meats, had arranged for storage space on 
the vessel. Orders were given to The 
Lilley-Cameron Cartage Co. to commence 
loading June ■>'.) and :50, and deliveries 
were made on the days named. It ap- 
pears that, owing to July 1 being a holi- 
day, the balance of the shipments were not 
offered until July ±, when, on arriving at 
the dock, the captain of the Wyandotte 
refused to permit the Canadian goods to 
be taken on board, and after keeping the 
Canadian goods waiting for over two 
hours, sent them back to the packing- 
house, but took on 10 carloads of Ameri- 



can beef, which were standing in refriger- 
ator cars in the dock. 

The cartage company's protest was ol 
no avail, and the result was that about ."><) 
cases of Canadian meat were left behind, 
while the 10 carloads of American meat 
secured storage room. 

It seems to us a matter lor Federal in- 
vestigation, and should it be shown that 
Canadian shippers are being discriminated 
against the parties at fault should be 
brought to task. Canadian manufac- 
turers and shippers should at least have 
equal opportunities with competitors, to 
say nothing of a legitimate preference, on 
their own subsidized lines, but when it 
comes to a case like this, where Canadian 
goods were kept in the sun for over two 
hours, and then absolutely refused, while 
American shipments were being loaded 
out of refrigerator cars, it seems to us 
time to enter a protest in the name of our 
Canadian manufacturers and shippers. It 
will be the object of The Grocer to fully 
investigate cases of discrimination against 
Canadian exporters, and should they be 
proven, to follow the matter up until a 
remedy is applied. 



ANDREW CARNEGIE'S OPINION OF 
CANADA 

ON May 9th The Ironmonger, London, 
published an interview with Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie, the newly elected presi- 
dent of the Iron and Steel Institute of 
Great Britain, in which the following ex- 
tracts referring to Canada and Australia 
were cabled to Canadian papers : 

If I may ask you (said the interviewer) to take 
another step into the realms of prophecy, do you 
think that Canada is destined to be the link which 
will bring about this union of the mother country 
and the Republic ? Will Canada, grown populous 
by immigration, spiritually British and materially 
American, bring about the merger (forgive the 
word) of the Brilish-speaking peoples? 

"Certainly not," said Mr. Carnegie. "Canada 
has no future except as part of the United States 
Her native population increases more slowly than 
that of Scotland. She has only added 536,000 to 
her people in ten years, and of these 440,000 have 
come from abroad. Canada can never, standing 
alone, become a great industrial nation. Her 
steel industry? A figment. She hasn't made 
much steel yet, and that only under a bounty of 
seven dollars a ton. Cape Breton? A mirage. 
Nothing there need ever trouble the United States. 
And Australia? Why, Australia is like Egypt, a 
green ribbon in an arid desert. In no conceivable 
circumstances can your colonies ever have a 
population approaching that of the United States. 
Your whi.e colonies, all together, only have ten 
millions of people now, the United States will in- 
crease by seventeen millions in this one decade. 

22 



Your colonial empire, in fact — what is it but a 
catchword of your politicians? " 

Naturally such an expression of opinion 
by one so prominent caused bitted critic- 
ism throughout Canada, criticism so gen- 
eral that Mr. Carnegie took the extreme 
measure of writing a long personal letter 
to The Toronto Globe in which he denies 
having uttered the sentiments credited to 
him by The Ironmonger's interviewer, 
staling that the reporter had distorted his 
views and thus published them, despite .1 
pledge to show the manuscript to him be- 
fdre publication. In this letter the follow- 
ing extract appeared : 

Instead of disparaging any part of our widely 
scattered race, I wish to harmonise and bring them 
all together, sharing each other's lot in one great 
whole. Such was the trend of every word I spoke. 
I never miss an opportunity to speak of the virtues 
of the Briton to the American and vice versa, nor 
to laud the respective virtues of the absent Briton, 
Canadian, Australian, and American to the mem- 
ber or members of our race who may be present. 
No one can have more at heart the prosperity of 
every English-speaking community throughout the 
world, nor wish more ardently to see them unite. 
No one can exclaim more sincerely, " Advance 
Australia!" and "The Maple-leaf for Ever! - ' 

It will be seen at a glance that Mr. 

Carnegie's letter placed The Ironmonger 

and its interviewer in an unenviable light. 

But the reply by that paper must be heard 

before judgment is passed. In the issue 

of July 4 it says : 

If the statements mac"e above over the signature 
" Andrew Carnegie " are intended to refer to the 
interview which appeared in our ' ' Iron and Steel 
Number of May 9, (the only interview with Mr. 
Carnegie ever published in The Ironmonger,) they 
are absolutely devoid of foundation. We shall 
ehow, in our next issue, that that interview was ob- 
tained by perfectly straightforward means, and that 
Mr. Carnegie knew that what he said would be 
published, and approved of such publication. 



THE OUTLOOK FOR FENCING WIRE. 

WIRE fence makers have a good out- 
look for years to come in Ontario, 
where old rails are rotting and fresh rails 
are not to be had. The sales for wire 
fencing are experiencing heavy increases. 
But it is in the Northwest that the great 
future for fence makers lies. The gener- 
al character of fencing in the West so far, 
and for some years to come, is boundary 
fencing, which consists of two or three 
strands of wire to enclose wheat and graz- 
ing land. But when farming becomes more 
mixed, and the farms are laid out infields, 
the consumption of fencing will grow en- 
ormously. And fences require posts, and 
the post of the future will be iron. Cedar 
posts have to be shipped in and the cost 
equals that ol~ an iron post. Hardware 
AND Metal is informed that the supply of 
iron posts for Northwest fencing has 
been far from sufficient, and if this be so 
it would seem that there is in this circum- 
stance a profitable and lasting field for 
several foundries. 



EDITORIAL 



Hbrdwkrv and 



COMMERCIAL INTEGRITY. 



THI^ experience of manufacturers, re- 
garding the conduct of dealers in 
handling their goods, varies considerably. 
The marry advantages and great con- 
venience 1 o( the dealer to t ho manufacturer, 
is indisputable. He serves as h medium 
for distribution, at once complete and 
effective, and therefore of great value; in- 
side which he saves to the manufacturer 
the multiplicity of detail, risk and expense 
which naturally arises upon the more 
minute distribution. The dealer, Owing 
to the great number of lines handled by 
him, is in a position to undertake these 
responsibilities at a commission compar- 
ably small to the cost it would mean to 
the individual manufacturer, were he to 
undertake such. 

Further, the dealer who retains the 
good-will and confidence o( his retail 
clients is clearly in a position to introduce 
more readily and effectually the many 
new and varied kinds of products which 
it is continually necessary to bring for- 
ward, if the reputation of the manu- 
facturer is to be maintained. 

This latter point without doubt is one ot 
the dealer's strongholds. The retail mer- 
chant regards his jobber, not merely as a 
medium of supply, but as a channel, by- 
means of which, he is enabled to keep 
continually in touch with the constantly 
varying markets, and from whom he can 
obtain those courtesies of information and 
advice which often will make all the differ- 
ence between profitable and unprofitable 
business. 

Without question, confidence is the 
great establishing factor in building up a 
clientage ; the dealer who can command 
the confidence of his patrons secures for 
himself an asset which will survive the 
keenest of competition. Hut to obtain 
this, he must be moved by a principle far 
in advance of, and which will surmount, 
the often delusive considerations of dollars 
and cents — notwithstanding the import- 
ant part they play in the race for success. 
There are, however, men who are too 
short-sighted to see beyond the range o\ 
present advantage, who greedily seize any 
opportunity to make a few additional 
dollars, and who will stoop to make mean 



use of this confidence to suit their ends, 

even though it be at the expense ol that 

principle which is a positive necessity to 

health) business existent e. 

That this class of man is to be met with 

in all positions of trade and commerce is 
unfortunate!] true, but nevertheless theii 
presence should stimulate every honest 
trader to denounce and expose their 
met hods. 

fur experience of such men is that they 
an- short-lived, seldom succeeding in hold- 
ing trade tor any length of time, notwith- 
standing their ability to deceive. Still it 
is difficult to estimate the extent of dam- 
age thus done to health) trade. 

Quite lately our attention has been 
called to an example ol' what was, to say 
the least, a palpably mean and discredit- 
able way of opposing a manufacturer and 
which it seems difficult to credit, were it 
not that the information came from indis- 
putable authority. 

The said manufacturer making, as he 
does, a line of goods of undoubted quality, 
to maintain which necessitates a deal of 
extra expense and labor, has had his 
wrappings and packages copied, in almost 
every particular, by a rival firm who are 
making goods to imitate, but decidedly 
inferior in quality to those supplied by the 
first manufacturer, and at, of course, a 
much lower price than it is possible to 
produce the better class goods. 

It is in the very nature of things that 
competition will always be active to avail 
itself o( any noticeable success in any given 
line, and is, in all probability, an incen- 
tive rather than a hindrance to trade, but 
competition, to be beneficial, must be on 
equably correct lines, and the first principle 
should be that all goods should stand on 
their intrinsic merit alone and not depend- 
ent upon subterfuge tor an entrance into 
market. 

Now, this imitation by no means dis- 
concerted the manufacturer referred to, 
believing as he did, and having every rea- 
son to believe, that, taken on their absolute 
worth, his product would come out oil top, 
and that the dealers would not be deceived 
by the similarity of their "get up." 

This in many instances proved correct. 
Hut where the real injustice o\ the situa- 
tion comes in, as has been pointed out on 
23 



othei occasions, is between dealer and re- 
tailer. And it is upon this feature thai 
comment becomes necessary. 
The retailer mails his order to his jobber, 

mentioning, amongst other things, a line 

ol So and-So's goods, and the jobber, alive 

to tin- extra profit on tin- thai and knowing 
his man, sends oil a line of another make, 

gOl up to look like the he I ler article, trust- 
ing to his Ingenuity to meet complaint 

should one arise, The retailer, however, 
probably in immediate rued of the goods 
in question, places them in store for sale 

and the error is not detected until it is too 
late for correction, and possibly injury has 

been done to his trade. 

Now, as regards the manufacturer there 

is little to sav. It is clear that as regards 
his goods he is quite at liberty to make 
what quality he desires and whatever 
style he thinks fit, but for his own reputa- 
tion's sake, and the permanent success of 
his venture, it would have been better to 
place his goods on the market in an inde- 
pendent way and on their own merits, to 
sav nothing of the injustice done to the 
goods imitated. 

Hut the dealer stands in a different light 
and no excuse can be raised to justify any- 
thing on his part bearing the semblance of 
deception. Standing as he does as a 
middleman between manufacturer and 
trader, it is of the very first importance 
that he give fair and equal consideration 
to every product coming to his hand, and 
warrant, in every way, his position as 
trusted agent of the manufacturer. No 
language can be found adequate to con- 
done conduct of the character before men- 
tioned. 

And equally so is it the duty of the job- 
ber to see that any variation or imitation, 
such as we mention, is pointed out to his 
retail friends, that in their turn they may 
be readily on guard to protect their 
customers. 

In these days of easy and quick com- 
munication, there can be no excuse for 
introducing such unequal and deceptive 
methods of competition. The traveller, 
telephone and telegraph place jobber and 
merchant in such read" touch with one 
another, that the "out of stock," and 
"just as good " excuses cannot for a 
moment hold water, and the retail merch- 
ant will do well to think twice before 
placing further confidence in firms re- 
sorting to such manoeuvres. 

As between wholesaler and retailer the 
greatest confidence should exist in the 
interests of both parties, and for the 
maintainance of that commercial morality 
without which healthy business life can- 
not be maintained. 



Hardware and 



Markets and Market Notes 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 
Montreal, July 16, 

HARDWARE. 



11)03. 



■f I - i,'i > . are houses are 

^ ^ I,. i this t iin. ..l 

when, ;i- a rule, the Summer 
.lulu.-.- sets in for a couple of months . 
and in several lines shipments are going 
forward briskly. In a large measure tins 
is due i>' the increasing demands of the 
growing Northwest, where much of the 
extra goods is forwarded. Not only Lite 
jobbing houses, but manufacturers and 
rolling mills ulso participate in the good 
Summer trade. V large Montreal rolling 
mills concern did the heaviest month's 
trade in their history during th«' month 
of June. The market is without anj 
strong feature as regards changes in 
prices except that, as is natural, a good 
deal of discussion is in progress over ihe 
change in the selling terms of manufac- 
turers to jobbers. On iron auger lilts the 
price is now settled, ami the discount is 
:',:', I :; per cent. 

BAKU WIRE. This continues quiet and 
at unchanged prices. We quote: $2.8U 
per LOO lb. f.o.b. Montreal, and 82.55 
f.o.b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons are 
quoted f.o.b. Cleveland at $2.45. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— Not nuu-h busi 
ii — has transpired this week, and .lie 
market is quiet at the following prices : 
No. 5, §3.7U ; No. 0, 7 ami 8, $3.15; No. 

9, §2.55; No. 10, §3.20; No. 11, §3.25; 
No. 12, §2.65; No. 13, §2.75; No. 14, 
§3.75. in carlots, f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 

J 20 ; Xos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, §2.15 ; No. 

10, JJ2.20; No. 11, §2.25; No. 12, §2.30; 
No. 13, §2.40; No. 14, §2.50. In less than 
carlots, I2^c. per 100 lb. extra is charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. There is little 
doing and no change to note in pri 
this week. Quotations are as follows 
Bright and annealed, §2.50 per 100 lb. 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and St. John. Net extras 
per 100 lb. are now as follows : 
Coppered v'-e, 60c.; tinned wire, §2 ; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, §1.25; best 
steel wire. ~:>c; blight soft drawn, 15c; 
special hav-baliriL-' wire, 30c. 

FINE STEEL WIRE A few small or 
ders ~ ii tn up the business in this line- 
Discounts are unchanged and we quote as 
follows : 25 per cent., with ex- 
tras : 1 and 2-lb. hanks, 25c per 100 It).; 
Alb. hanks, 37^o. and J-lb. hanks, 50c 
" I'd! VSS W IRE.- Market is dull. I i. • 
discount remain- at 'ill pei cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. There is a small 
amount of business passing (Quotations 
fob. the various Maritime and Ontari i 
points are now omitted. The discount 
i- 2u per cent. 

FENCE SI VPLES. Trade is quiet at 
unchanged price-, which are as follow- : 
galvanized, $3 per 100 lb. ki 
$2 SO per 100 lb. keg ; 25 and 50 lb. 
pacl 5i extra. 

Ml NAILS Trade continues go d. 
The price is 52.45 f.o.b. Montreal. 

WIRE NAIL9. Wire nails are moving 

out well at 82 1» i ■■!■ ken '" carlots and 

per keg iu -mailer lots, f.o.b. 



Gauanoque, Montreal. London. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, (int.. and 
St John. 

H0RSENA1LS. A small amount oi 
business is doing this week. The dis- 
counts aie : "M" brand. "Oval" a. id 
"New City" heads, .V> per cent. ; "Coun 
tersunk" heads, 55 per cent. ; "C" brand, 
10, 10 and ' !, per cent, off ; " Monarch. 
."|H and ~i !, per cent . and "IVeile-s." 50 

ent. 
HORSESHOES. The market is not a- 
tive, but the feeling is steady and prices 
are unchanged. (tin quotations are as 

follows: Iron shoes. light and med 
ium pattern. No. 2 and larger, 
§3.65; No. 1 and smaller, §3.90; snow pat- 
tern, No. 2 and larger, §3.90 ; No I aed 
smaller, §1.15; X L steel shoes, n"W, 
light pattern, sizes 1 to 5, No. 2 and 
larger, §3.S0 ; No. 1 and smaller, 34.05 ; 
featherweight, all sizes, to 4, >?5.3o . toe 
weight, all sizes, 1 to 4, §6.60. Shoes, 
more than one size in a keg, 10c. per keg 
extra f.o.b. Montreal only. 

i;i\ ETS AND BURRS. Thee has been 

no change as yet in these, and trade is 
quiet. We quote the discounts as follows : 
l'.e-i iron rivets, section carriage 
and wagon box, black rivets, tin 
ued do., coopers' rivets and tinned 
swedes rivets, 60 and 10 per cent.; swedes 
iron burrs are quoted at 55 per cent, off ; 
copper rivets, with the usual proportion 
of burrs, 45 per cent, off, and coppered 
iron rivets and burrs, in 5-tb. carton 
boxes are quoted at 60 and 10 per cent. 
off list. 

BOLTS AM) M 'IS. There is a good 

demand this week, under steady prices. 
The discounts are : Common carriage 
bolts, olj per cent. ; lull square car 
riage, 55; machine, 50 and 5; 
coach screws, 66 2-3 ; sleighshoe bolts, 
65 and 5 ; blank bolts, 50 and 5 ; bolt 
ends, 50 and 5 ; plough bolts, 50 and 5 ; 
tire bolts, 67^ per cent.; stove bolts, 
67^ per cent. Nuts, square, 3£c per tb. 
oil' list ; hexagon nuts, 3fc. per lb. off 
list. 
SCREWS. Trade is onlj f ii. The 

discount.- are unchanged as follows : 
liound head bright, v _", per cent. : Hat 
head bright, K7J per cent. ; brass, round 

head, 75 pel' cent. ; brass. Hat head. S") 
per cent. 

CORDAGE. There is still a fair move- 
ment in cordage at s'teadv and unchanged 
prices. We quote: Pure manilla, 14-Jis ; 
British pure manilla, 12c; sisal, ll^c; 
double lathyarn. I I A.-: single lathyarn Mc: 
cotton rope, I6^c; cotton twine, 17 and 
20c for 3 and 1 ply. Cotton bed cord, 
90c to 81.35. according to length. 

BINDER TWINE. \ fair business is 
doine at Hi.', to 13c. 

I'd ILIUM. PAPER. There is a g I 

demand for buih'i - <_< naier. and the mar 
ket is active at Steady |ll ices. We 

quote 'I arred felt, $1.85 pi r 100 tb. ; 
2-plv readv roofing, 90c per roll ; 3 ply. 
81.15 per roll: carpet felt, 82.25 per 100 
lb.; dry sheathing. 40c. per roll ; tar 
Bhe thing. 50c per roll; dry fibre, 55c 
per roll : tailed fibre, 65c per roll ; K 
and I X L, 70c. per roll ; heavy straw 

24 



and sheathing, §35 per ton ; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

SHOT. There is not much doing. We 
epiote as follows : Ordinary drop shot, 
A. A. A. to dust, §6.50 per 11)0 tb.; 
chilled, Nos. 1 to 10, §7.00 per 100 
tb.; buck and seal, §7.50 per 100 lb.; 
ball, $8 per 100 tb. Trade discount, 15 
per cent, f.o.b." Montreal, Toronto, Ham 
ilton. London. St. John, N.B., and Mali 
fax. 

FIREBRICKS. A brisk inquiry is noted 
this week, English firebricks sell at $16 

to $22 per I. nun and Scotch at $17 to 

822 per 1,000 according to brand. 

CEMENT. There is a fair demand at 

the following prices; Canadian cemnt. 

$1.90 to $2. 25 ; German, $2.25 to $2.40 ; 
English, $2.15 to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 

to $1.95 per bid. ex-store, and A rican, 

$2.20 to $2.40 e.\ cars. 

METALS 

On the local market there has been DO 
quotable change; the volume of business 
passing continues satisfactory. The 

English market has shown some weak 
ness in Canada plates and tin plates, nut 
as yet no results are noticeable here. 
Canada plates, however, are easy here, as 
usual. Structural iron continues in de- 
mand, and business in this line is active'. 
Copper is easy and it is reported that 
prices are being shaded. 

PIG [RON.— There is a fair movement. 
The production of pig iron continues ac 
tive contrary to the expectations of 
the summer season, and in dune all re 
cords for a short month were surpassed. 
We quote a s follows : Carroll, No. 1, 
§21 ; do., No. 3, §19.75 ; Middlesboro', 
No. 3, $17.75; Ayersome, No. 1, §20; 
do., No. 3, §19.40. 

B \li li;o\.- Mher.- is not much doing 
Prices are as follows : Merchants' liar, 
$2 ; horseshoe- iron. $2.25 ; forged iron. 
$2.30. 

BLACK SHEETS. A mode-rate demand 
is reported, and quotations are as fol 
lows- 28 gauge, $2.45; 26 gauge, 
§2.40; 22 to "24 "gauge, §2.35; 18 to 20 
gauge. §2.30 and 8 to 10 gauge, $2.40. 

GALVANIZED [RON.— Some business 

has transpired this week at the lol 

lowing prices : 28, Queen's Head, 
si. in ; Apollo, in : ,< o/.. $4.30 ; Fleur 
de Lis. $4.15 ; Com.d. si ; Bell bran 1, 
$4.05." In less than case lots 25c- extra. 

LEAD PIPE.— Trade continues quiet and 
steady at 8e for composition and waste, 
and 7c for ordinary. The discount w 
30 per cent. 

[RON PIPE. This is in good demand 
I here has been no change in prices, and 
we still quote : Standard pipe, per 
100 ft., in lengths under 19 ft.: Black, $, 
82.40 ; |, $2.65 : ±. $2.85. ?. $3.65 : l-in.. 
§5.20; H. $7.35; I*. 8S.95; 2-in.. $12.55. 
Galvanized. \. 33.2(1; 2. S3.45 ; $. $3.85; 
?. §5: l-in.. $7.20; II 810.05; I}. $12- 
20 ; 2-in.. 416.85. Extra heavy pipe, 
plain ends, are quoted per 100 ft. as 
follows: Black. *. §4 20; ?. $5.25; l-in. 
$7.55: l>, 410.55: I \. §12.75: 2-in., $17.- 
60 Gnlvanized. \. 85.20; ?. §6.65: l-in.. 
§9.55; I}. 813.25: I}. 8tfi; 2 in.. 821.90. 

TIN I'l VTE These are- easy on both 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware »nd 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 
. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'"E CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where gteat strength 
is r quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



(. 



MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Pries to Sales Agents 

Orummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 

or to 

Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



tin' local and English market. Pi 
however, are -nil quoted at s l i"i coke . 
ami 14.25 tor charcoal 

TEENE PLATES. There is oo change 
Trade is quiet at 17.25. 

OOIL CHAINS. V few good orders hu>c 
been received this week. Prices show uo 
change, ami inn- quotation i<>! 

lows : No. i">. 10c ; \<>. •"). 9c; N,, I 
No. 3, 7c; J-in., Gic; 6-16-in., SOU; g- 
in., 84.20; 7-16-in., 84; J-in., 13.90; 9-16- 
in., $3.75; gin., $3,011; Jin., §3.50; gin., 
83.45, and 1-in., 83.40, with 10c. allow- 
unce on carlots. 

CANADA PLATES. Not much bu 
is doing, III' 1 markel is easy, though no 
actual change in prices is reported. We 
quote : '-^s. .%'. (in to s-j.tii ; 60s, 82.70 
t<> 82.80 ; 75s, 12.80 to si^ ; lull pol- 
ished, $3.75 and galvanized, 84.25 to 
84.35; galvanized, (iUs, $4.45 to 84.65. 

STEEL. There is some demand for 
steel, business being dour on the 
following basis : Stild, 82.06 ; sleigh 
shoe, 82.10 to 82.20 ; tire, 82.15 «o 
82.25 ; spring, 82.85 to 83 ; reek I 
machinery, 82.75 to 83; toecalk, 
82.60 to •■s'J.75 ; machinery (iron finish), 
$2.10; mild steel, $2.05; square harrow, 
82.50. 

TOOL STEEL. Trade is very quiet this 

week. Prices are as follows: lilacl 

Diamond 8 to 9c ; Sanderson's, 8 
to !•(•. according to the grade ; 
Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 7^c; Jonas & 
Colver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 50 
to 65c per lb. 
[NGOT COPPER. The markel is easy 

at 815.50 to SI.",. 75. 

[NGOT TIN. There is no change. 

Trade is dull at 33 to 833.25 per 100 li>. 

I'M ; I.I-: \l>. This is very quiet at 83.15 
to 83.26. 

SOLDER. Bar solder sells at 20c, and 

wire at 19c, with a fairly good business 
doing. 

ZINC SPELTER. -This market is dull. 

Tin- price remains at 86-75. 

SHEET ZINC— We quote 86.50 to 
86.75. There is very little doing. 
SCRAP METALS. 

There has been no change in the price 

of scrap metals this week. Coppers are 
inclined to be a little easier, Init no 
quotable change is announced. As usual 

at this season, trade is quiet. We quote 
as follows: Heavy copper and 

wire, 10c. per lb. ; light copper, 9c; 
heavy red brass, 10c; heavy yellow, 8-Jc; 
light brass, 5c; lead, 2 to 24c.; zinc, 2 J 
to 2fc.; iron, No. 1 wrought, 816 to 
$16.50 ; No. 2, 87.50 per ton ; machinery 
scrap, $16 to $16.50; stove plate, 913; 
malleable and steel. §6 ; mixed country 
rags, 60 to 70c per 100 tb.; old rubbers, 
Pi lo 6Jc. per lb. 

HIDES. 

There has been do further change in i he 

pi i.c of hides. Trade is rather uuiet. 

We quote : No. I beef hides. 8 to 9 : Ho. 

2. 7 to 8c ; No. 3, 6 to 7c. No. I bull' 
sheepskins. 7.1 to 77c. Lambskins, lie; 

No. 2. 9c. 

RAW FURS. 

Trade continues very quiet this week. 
A variety of prices are quoted for good 
furs. An advance of si in large Labra- 
dor and choice Eastern, Territory Rocky 
Mountains beaver, and 82 advance for 

large, strict lv prime, being noted. Otter 
shows strong advance, large North-East- 
ern being quoted at 820, and small at 
812, an advance of 810 ami 86 over last 
week's quotations. We quote : 

25 



TINPLATES 



DOMINION CROWN 

coal, tissued. 
ALLAWAYS -Besi Charcoal. 
CANADA CROWN "—Charcoal. 
LYDBROOK 
TRVM 



I'.' ii .'oke. 
All standard brands. Accept no substitute. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 

DON'T HESITATE 

m recommend 
McDougall Pumps 

to 1 lie man H ho H ;mt- 
to Imy. 

our guarantee in at 
the back of 

pump we make, ami 

good to ) I 
yOOI money. 

You can sell 

McDougall Pumps 

knowing tiiey are all 

right, or if not so. that 
they will either I 
placed, or .the money 
refunded. 




(or the asking. 



The R. McDOUGALL CO, li* 



Ited 



G.VI.T, 0\T. 



Pig Tin 

BOUSTEAD & CO.'S PENANG. 

INGOT COPPER 

LAKE AND CASTING. 

PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 
PIG IRON 



ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton. Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u mM 

HEW GLASGOW, l.S. 



Ferrona Pig Iron 

Aad RBfflB KAJtm 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



■ and 



THE MARK IHS 






Mr-li in Small 



Kitta 

>1 1 50 



LOO 




j. 00 






n 






<llinll 






6.00 



5.00 
3 

.10 
Pale 
5.00 
3.50 

a 

1 2t 
1.4(1 

Pale 
(,00 

25.00 



4 
.05 

3.00 
2.00 

3 

.78 

.50 

-' 
2.50 

15.00 
2 



8.00 4 mi 
\ 1.00 

3.00 8.00 
\ 1 SO 50 

Medi in 

15.06 iaoo 

1S.00 

1 1 

50 IE 

Dart 

6 iO 5.00 

B 90 ,i 00 

Simill 

similar tine bright red kindi t 00 8.75 

L00 

Pali 

tinea in.oo 7.00 

■ 50 00 

.Mi.UO-fiO 35.00 

Uedi'm Small 

1.00*00 .'.'i • -4,00 

.4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2.00 

Dark Brown l'alc 2 

MM Columbia, Northern Pacific and similar.. ., 7.00 5.00 3.50 1.75 to2.50 

7.00 2.25 1.50 1.00 

3.00-3.50 2.25-3.00 2 to 2.25 1.00 

Large Uedi'm Small 2 Large 2 

MIS! 4.00 3.25 2.50 2.25 

1 50-8.00 1.50 1.00 .75 

Spring Winter Fall Kids 

MCSKRAT Eastern,!) 25-28,-. .10to.l38 to 10 2 to 5 

Itory and Western 20c. 5to.l0 .07 2 to 4 

Large Small 2 3 

ibrador and far North-Eastern 810 7.00-10 10.00-12 2.50-5 2 

rerritorr and Western 4.00 4.50 3.50 to 5 2.25 

Large Small 2 3 

•\ 75-1.25 .60-75 .33-50 .25 

I.. i.ling to <lurknei», size and beauty 2.25 2.00 1.00 .50 

Black Shrl StLongSt White 

SRI NK 75-1.25 .75 .40-50 .0.5-15 . 

Dark Brown Pale 2 
unl.VKKINK Vjl.i. according to darkness, size and beauty. . 5.00 4.00 2.50 1.50 



3 

3.00 



Cuba » 

to *800 
1 no lo 5.00 



3 
i I 
1.00 

4 

80 

.20 

3 
1.50 
9.08 
5.00 

3 
1 00 

3 
1.00 

.60 

.50 
•Small 
1.50 



4 

.50 

.50 



4 

.50 
4.50 
2.50 

.25 
20 
4 

.25 

.20 

.25 

3 

.40 

.25 



.25 

.15-25 



4 

to 4.00 
.50 
4 

.15 
.25 



Cubs 
[.00 to $2.00 
.25 to .50 



4 

.25 



CASTOREUM-. 



.$5.00 to $6.00 per pound. 



MANITOBA MARKETS. 



\LL ha 
bu«y. 



Winnipeg, July 13, 100?,. 
LL hardware jobbing bouses are very 
There is no special run on 
;m\ one line, but all lines of goods 
seem i" be in demand. June is general- 
ly looked upon as a quiet month, but 
tins season the business of June was 
more than double that of June, 1902. 
Building hardware has. of course, been a 
heavj item in this year's sales, but every 
class of hardware is railed for. The 
price list shows only our change in two 
weeks and that is a reduction of 10c on 
bar iron, which is now quoted at $'2.< 
instead of 82.70 as formerly. We quote : 



Barbed wire, too lb 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 

9 



$3 25 
3 39 
2 50 

5° 



13 

U 

IS 

16 

Barbed wire, 100 lb 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire , 10 



Wire Nails — 



Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 
Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 . . 
No. 2 and larger . 

Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger 

Cut Nails— 

2d 1 in $\ 10 

3d Fin. i'/t in. . 4 10 

3d iji in 3 75 

4d iM in 3 50 

Sd 1 y* in 3 50 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2% in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

20d 4 in 3 15 

3od 4H in 3 10 

40d 5 in 3 10 

Sod 5K in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



•13 
.14 

•IS 



83 25 
3 21; 

3 65 

3 is 

3 48 
3 56 
3 66 
3 76 
3 91 



4 75 
4 45 
4 95 
4 7° 

4 45 
4 25 



I in J84 

l'/t in 4 



i'A 

iH 

2 

2% 

3 

3* 

4 

4# 

5 

S« 

6 



Bar iron, $2.60 basis. 
Swedish iron, $4.75 basis, 

Sleigh shoe steel , , 285 

Spring steel , 3 25 

Machinery steel 3 5° 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb 8 50 

Jessop 130° 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 3 50 

1 8 to 22 gauge 3 75 

24 gauge 3 90 

26 gauge .... 4 00 

28 gauge 410 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge .... 4 00 

18 and 20 gauge 4 00 

22 and 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 25 

28gauge 4 50 

30 gauge or 10K oz 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

28 " 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Genuine Russian, per lb , 11 

Imitation " " 07 to 08 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26gauge 850 

finplate, IC charcoal, 20x28, box .... 1000 

" IX 12 00 

IXX " 1400 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24 and 20. \ 28. 3 25 

Canada plate, full polished 4 00 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 50 

Broken lots 8 00 

Pig lead, 100 lb 5 50 

Black iron pipe, Y» inch 3 go 

Y* 3 3° 

3 4° 

H " 3 70 

Black iron pipe, K inch 4 30 

1 " 6 25 

*H " ••• 875 

iM " 10 50 

2 " 14 5° 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis $12 25 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathyarn n 75 

Solder 20 

Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 70 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p c. 

Round" " 8op.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 70 and 10 p.m. 

Coach 65 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage sop.r. 

Machine 50 and 5 p.c. 

Tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

26 



Sleigh shoe 65 p.c. 

Plough 50 p.c. 

Flat head stove 60 and 5 p.c. 

Round head 60 and 5 p.c. 

Elevator 60 p.c' 

Rivets, iron 50 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch ioK 

y t inch 8# 

S-16 inch 5 J4 

H inch 5% 

7-16 inch 5 

% to X inch 4K 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz. . $3 is 

No. 1 1 90 

No. 2 1 60 

Octagon extra 2 30 

No. 1 1 60 

Files common 70, and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F. , pistol 30 p.c. 

military 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley 's soft, 12 gauge black 16 50 

chilled, 12 gauge 1800 

soft, 10 gauge 21 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 23 00 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 20 

Chilled : 660 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F.F.G s 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

plain 7Sand2Kp.c. 

" pieced 

Japanned ware 37}$ p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 anp 10 p.c. 

Imperial 5° Br >d 10 d.c. 

Green Wire Cloth 1 50 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 26&C. 

Prime white American 24 'Ac. 

Water white Canadian 24c. 

Prime white Canadian 22'Ac. 

SCRAP. 



No. 1 cast iron 

No. 2 " 

Wrought iron scrap. . . 

Copper (heavy) 

Yellow brass (heavy) . 

Light brass , 

Lead pipe, or tea lead. 
Zinc scrap 



$16 per ton 
8 
5 

7c. per lb. 
7Mc 
to 6c. " 
to 2*Ac. " 
ic. " 



PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS. 

Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 79 

Less than barrel lots o 84 

Linseed oil, raw 66 

Boiled 69 

Lubricating oils, Eldorado castor 28S 

Eldorado engine 27 H 

Atlantic red 33J4 

Renown engine 42 

Black oil 19% to 21 'A 

Cylinder oil (according to grade) . . 55 to 74 

Harness oil 56 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Steam refined oil 85 

Sperm oil 2 00 

.Pure castor oil, first pressure 10 

Lubricating 10 

BINDER TWINE. 

Jute, per lb $0 10% 

Sisal, per lb o 11 

Standard, per lb on 

Manila, per lb , 550 ft o 12 

Manila, per lb., 600 ft o 12'A 

Manila (pure), per lb o 13'A 

F.O.B. Chicago; discount 14c. on 5-ton lots and 
'Ac. on car lots. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA MARKETS. 
Vancouver, B.C., July 11, 1003. 

DEVELOPMENTS of the week in the 
planing mill hands and the mill 
difficulty between the factory and 
owners have been rather startling t<> 
trade, especially in building circles. The 



THE MARKETS 



11. 



I i \ w . i i ■ • 






striking hands ore all skilled woodwork 

crs, un<l beiug meuxoera ol the car] i 

unions, found no difficulty in getting 
work al going wages, the scale for oai 
penters being consinerablj nighei tnan 
the factory bands were getting, and tin: 
duy being eighl hours instead of tun. 
The factory hands now demand a nine 
hour day. which the nails :a\ they can 
not give. I !»■ allegata a made ny the 
mill owners, which does not seem to be 
borni' out by observation oi the general 
condition oi the trade, is that thej can 
not compete Ln the Lumber trade in the 
Northwest ami Manitoba if they give tl 
nine-hour dav instead oi ten hours. I'hey 
claim that the mills of the lint fortage 
countrj and those oi the United Stated, 
which compete in the northwesl marKet, 
would have an advantage thereby. 
* # * 

' Tin- anion taken bj the mill men, 
which has caused such disturbance ia 
trade circles was to shut down on all lie 
livery oi lumber within the city of \ tin 
comer. They claim they take this ac 
tion because the men are being given 
work as carpenters, and being supported 
by the carpenters who have been kept 
employed by the delivery of lumber from 
the mills, whom the strikers and their 
friends are opposing. It is, of course, 
the aim of the mills to shut down all 
building operations, and thus throw out 
of employment all the different building 
trades, until the factor) hands give Ln 
and return to work. As a result, all 
classes of trade are disturbed, and par 
tnulaiK so the dealers in builders' hard 
ware, who have been doing a heavy trade 
so far and have stocked up with the 
expectation of a continuance. That this 
was justified can be gathered from the 
returns of the building inspector's office. 
Up to date this year there have oeen 
permits issued for buildings to the aggre- 
gate value of over 1600,000, all of which 
are either completed now, or under con- 
struction. These figures do not include 
two large public buildings, the new Gen- 
eral Hospital and the High School build- 
ing, both oi which are practically under 
contract for construction this year. It 
is the intention to rush work on each 
to as early a completion as possible. I he 
hospital is to cost $100,000, and the 
High School is planned for 170,000, but 
it may be necessary to add to this, as a 
suitable building can hardly be erected 
at the price set in the loan. 
* # # 

There is a second action, the outcome oi 
the boycott of the city by the mills, 
which will have the elTect of bringing the 
first into active force, and that is the 
orders issued for a general cessation of 
work. The men are being laid oil" as 
fast as material is used up, for new 
stocks cannot be obtained. It was also 
said that the mills had in contemplation 
a general shutdown, closing the mills en- 
tirely and stopping export and shipments 
to the Northwest. This is, however, 
entirely discredited by those who are in 
touch with the situation. The trade 
with the Northwest, which has been grow- 
ing in importance every year would not 
allow of such a stoppage, even if the 
mills were willing to take the chance oi 
losing such valuable trade. The only 
ray oi hope is the firm belief every one 
has that the matter will be settled with 
very little delay. Were it not for thid 
confidence, there would be many uneasy 
people in Vancouver, as the results of a 



Ioiil; siege would ,unpl\ -pell 
man} . 



OAKEY'S 



I he Lumber mill are in i ' ouble on uw 
other side of theii indu trj I he lo 
are complaining i hai i he pi Lees ha> i 
.lit until * l per thousand is offering loi 
Logs. A t t In- price t he) i annol exi t. 

I he [ . , ly in t hi and at 

which some loggers closed contracts, ran 

Iron. $8 to $10, To make matters v. 

been b hi a . j over produ 
oi logs. The null- have not been able 
to cut all the Logs offering, despite the 
.,. i that the) are i tinning Lull time. I Lie 
recentl) enforced regulation preventing 
i he export pi Log cut from Government 
Lands, cu1 market, for independ 

in t loggei formerly Bold to mills on 
I'uget Sound. When it is recalled that 

ii , amps have been put in \ei , 

extensively, until the number in operati >n 

is almost doubled, there is no trouble in 
accounting for the surplus oi logs. The 
mills are now dictating terms to the 
loggers, and the latter are petitioning 

the Government to remove the export 

embargo to relieve the situation. In 

order to prevent matters getting WOl 
The Lumbermen's Association, which is 
the organization of the Loggers, as dis 

Hint iion. The British Columbia Lumber 
Manufacturers' Association, has decided 
to close down all logging camps con 
trolled by them for six weeks, beginning 

August I. 

# # * 

The various machine works in coast 

cities will feel the curtailment of e\pa:i 

sion of the Logging industry, as they 

have, been supplying logging outfits to 
the limit of their capacity to turn them 
out. Many shops have not been able 
to manufacture till the donkey engines 
ordered during the past ten months. 1 lie 
other machinery and equipment of iog- 
eine camps has furnished much trade foi 
the machine shops also. 

* » # 

There is no change in the shingle situ i 
tion. The partial closing down of' ilie 
shingle mills is still in ell'ect, as the 
market has a large surplus stock to ab- 
sorb. A deal affecting the Iarg 
shingle mills in the world, those of the 
Hastings Shingle Mfg. Co., is on opti >n 
until July 20. The Rat Portage Lumber 
Co., which recently entered the held here 
by purchasing the mills of W. L. Tait & 
Son for $95,000, has made an oti'er, UU- 

derstood to be $100, for a controlling 

interest in the two mills of The Bastings 
Shingle Mfg. Co. This would include an 
interest in valuable and extensive timber 
limits controlled b) the latter company. 
It is understood that the Rat Portage 
people hold their offer open until July 
20, on the understanding that they have 

first option at the price they have offered. 

• * * 

The big blue funnel steamer Telemachus 
from Liverpool, with cargo for Victoria 
and Vancouver, arrived at the former 
port last Saturday and at Vancouver on 
Friday, duly 9. She discharges l,60U 
tons of cargo here. She has manifested 
for delivery here another large consign 
in, nt of firebrick and arches for tile 
Crow's Nest Pass Coke Ovens. The \m\ 
brought in the first lot received some 

weeks ago, and a third shipment is to 

arrive by the next steamer of the direct 
freight service established by The Ocean 
Steamship Co.. to which the Telemachus 
belongs, and the China Mutual Line, 
working in conjunction. Her manifest 



The original and only Cerium. | i 
• ii for Cleaning Cull. iy 
6d. ■] 

WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 



JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 



MANUrAOTI'KKKM Or 



Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTltKAI. 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy, NY 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps Chain, Kope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

FOR SALE IIV JOBBERS Al MFRS. >' K N_ K 



PRIEST' 5 CLIPPERS 

I raU- -« 'V^-^Pl.areert Variety, 
aLKP' H L^/// Toilet, Iliuiil, Electric Power] 

V ARE THE BEST. 

nigheft Quality LsrOOmlnf and 
Sheep -Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOR CATAI.'". 
American Shearer Hf|r. lu., Nailiua, N.1I..I Si 





The Best Door Closer is . . . 

NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING 
Will close a door silently against any pressure of 
wind. Has many working advantages over t lie 
ordinary spring, and has twice the wear. In use 
throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. Qlves 
perfect satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 
Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM 







You will be asked 
for Dundas Axes 
next fall. Are you 
preparing to meet 
the inquiry by be- 
ing able to show 
the goods ? 



Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

W. L. Hallmand Jr.. Eastern \- ' M otreal 




The Broadest Curriculum of Stud - indarf 

• ■.Hence The B< -' Prai 
M UyOOLH M u ' ratlin k. B A . Principal, Gl i i.i-ii. nu 



Hard-war* and 
Mat*] 



THE MARKETS 



To Meet the Increasing Demand for 



HORSE 



KEARNEY &. FOOT, 



RA8P8, 



MANUFACTURED BY 




Trade Mark 



We have added such modern 
machinery to our already exten- 
sive plant as only brains and 
money can produce, which enables 
us to give ourcustomersa superior 
RASP, which has a sharp elastic 
tooth and perfect temper. 

Horseshoers the world over will 
appreciate this tool. 

For sale by all prominent Black- 
smith Supply Houses and Hard- 
ware Merchants throughout the 
Dominion. 



NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY, DOMINION WORKS, PORT HOPE, CANADA. 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at So Tin' only Toaster guaranteed to toaal on 
gas, gasoline or bhie Maine oil stoves without taste or sine II. 
Write for pn 

THE FAIHGRIEVE /VIAINFG CO. 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers oi 

Set and Cap Screws, Special Hilled Work, Engine Studs, 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



Rails 



12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 24, 30, 35 and 56 lbs, to 
the Yard carried in STOCK for prompt ship- 
ment. TRACK REQUISITES. 



Sessenwein Bros.. 



103 Mianuon St. 

. . MONTREAL. 



shows the following metal and hardware 
shipments: ' ■""" stee ' rails, 150 bdles. 
lish plate-. 72 fjsll plates, 27 cases. :i 
casks, 71 pkgs. machinery, II cases 
Scotch granite, 21 coils wire cable, 2 
chains tor marine railway purposes, 12, 
7.">n steel angle bars, 8 casks napthaliue, 

."in zinc plates. .") cases zinc plates. 93 

cases steel sheets, 272 bdles. hoop iron. 
10 cases black steel sheets. 105 black 

steel sheets. 500 tolls hematite pig iron, 

58 bdles. bar iron, (ill bars iron. 5 causes 
shellac. ~n drums Jeyes fluid. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Toronto. July 17. L903. 
MAR \n/AHk. 

WBILE the volume of business is 
undoubtedly -mailer, there is an 
excellent tone about the market, 
a feeling that the business retailers are 
doing must be larger than usual at this 
n. Orders for many lines have fal 
len away materially, yet wire nails, 
-crews, bolts and nuts, building paper, 
i doors, harvest tools, plumbers' 

liia-- goods] etc. are selling well. The 

feature regarding prices i- the decision of 
manufacturers to make an extra price for 

small lots of nuts and washers. Tin' 
new extra price- are 



Pa.k:, I li... per II. ■ ictra ni I 

.vi •• •• :. 

25 " " ... ?e. 



- under .'. i lb., i»-r lb. extra nel Ic, 

IS " - - 2.-. 

The discounts of standard and quick- 
opening valves and skfuare-head cock- has 
been Deduced 5 per cent., equivalent to a 
net advance of over 10 per cent. 

Manufacture,- of -hot and lead pipe 



have followed the example of the makers 
of nails, screws, etc., in shortening their 
terms of sales to (id days net, or 2 per 
cent, oli' at 30 days. Word has not yet 
been received as to what decision the re- 
presentatives of wholesale houses, who met 
at Gananoque this week, reached regard 
ing terms. An advance in poultry act- 
tine js anticipated by some houses. 

BARB WIRE.— There is not much doing. 
Prices are unchanged, the base being 
$2.55 from Cleveland and 10c less in 
carlots. From stock, Toronto, *2.80. 

GALVANIZED WIRE. Trade keeps up 
fairly well. We quote as follows: No. <>, 
7 and >;. §3.15 to 83.35 per 100 lb. ; No. 
'.), S2.50 ; No. 10, §3.20 to §3.40 ; No. 
I 1 . 83.25 to 83.45 ; No. 12, 82 65 ; No. 
13, 82.75; No. 14, 83.75 to 83.95; No. 
15, 84.30 ; No. 16, 84.55. Nos. 6 to 
base from Cleveland are quoted at 
S-2.274 in less than carlots and at 82.15 
in carlots. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE.— A moderate 
movement is recorded at steady prices. 
We quote: Base price $2.50 per 
100 It). Oiling-, 10c; coppering, 60c; and 
tinning, 82 per 100 lb. extra. Shipping 
points, Toronto, Hamilton, London, and 
Montreal, with freights equalized on 
those points. 

COIL SPRING WIRE. Business is keep 
ing fairly active. Prices arc unchanged. 
We quote: No. 9, $2.75; No. I I. $3.40; No. 
12. $2.95. Freight up to 25c per 100-lb. 
allowed on 500 lb. or over. Carlots of 
15 tons, 5c. less, with freight up to 20c. 
allowed. 

w [RE NAILS;— A good demand cou- 
tinues at steady prices. Our quota 

lion- are as follows: Carlots. $2.40, 
and small lots. $2.45 per keg f.o.b 
Gananoque, Montreal, London, Hamil 

5!8 



ton, Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, Ont., 
and St. John. 

CUT NAILS. — A fair sorting business 
keeps up at 82.50 per keg f.o.b. Toronto. 

HOKSE NAILS.— A fair trade is doing 
at steady prices. We quote : " C" 
brand, oval head, 40 and 40 and 7^ per 
cent.; on " Monarch," 60 per cent., and 
" Countersunk" head, 55 per cent.; on 
" Peerless," 45 and 7-J per cent. 

B€RSE SHOES.— Business is fair. Our 
quotations are : f.o.b. Toronto ; Iron 
shoes, No. 2 and larger, 83.80 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, 84.05. Steel, new light shoes, 
No. 2 and larger, 83.95 ; No. 1 and 
smaller, 84.20. Snow shoes, No. 2 and 
larger, 84.05 ; No. 1 and lighter, 84.30. 
If shipped from factory, 10 to 15c. less. 

SCREWS. — The shortage is about re- 
lieved and a good trade is doing. 
We quote as follows : Flat head bright, 
87$ per cent, discount ; round head 
bright, 82$ per cent.; flat head brass, 80 
per cent.; round head brass, 75 per cent.; 
round head bronze, 70 per cent.; Hat head 
bronze, -75 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURS.— The demand con- 
tinues active; prices steady. Quotations 
are as follows : Iron rivets, 60 and 
In per cent, discount; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent.; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

BOLTS AM) NUTS.— The difficulty in 
getting supplies is still curtailing sales. 
Our quotations are as follows: Carriage 
bolts, common (81 list), 50 and 10 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, full square (82.40 
list), 55 and 10 per cent.; carriage bolts, 
Norway iron (83 list), 55 and 10 per 
cent.; machine bolts, all sizes, 50, 5 and 
10 per cent.; coach screws, cone points, 
<i<* 2 :'. and 10 per cent. 

BINDER TW l\K. Orders are wed in 
and the market is report. :d firm. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and 

Meol 



We quote as follows : 650 ft., 

13c; GOO ft., 12c; 550 ft., ll^c; 500 ft., 
10^c 

COItDA* rE, A fair mov em 'ii t ir iv 'mil 

ed. We quote as follows: Pure meusila, 
IHc; British pure manila, L2C; 
sisal, ll£c; double lathyarn, 1 1 !.<• ; 
single lathyarn, lie; double Bhingleyarn, 
ll^c; single sningleyarn, lie; sashcofd, 
25 to 30c, 

LAWN StOWERS. Business is practioal 
l\ ended. Prices unchanged. We quote 
Woo.lyatt, 12 in., $7.50; 14 in., $>> ; 10 
in., $8.50; IS in., $9 . 20-in., *10 ; Star, 
12-in., $5.5(1 ; I 1 in., $5.75 ; 16 in., s»i , 
Daisy, 12 in., $4.90 ; 14-in., $5.10; 16 
in., $5.30 ; Ontario. 12 in., $1 1.25 ; 1 1 in., 
$15.80; 16 iu.. $16.80; 18 in., |18.90; 20- 
in.. $20.50 ; Philadelphia, 12-in., $6.60 . 
I l in . $7 ; 16 in., $7.50. Discount, 10 
and 10 to 50 per cent. 

SOIL PIPE AND KTiTINOS, Attn, 
lion is directed to the schedule of weights 
and silos on another page. There Is 
a good business at steady pries. 
Discounts are as follows : Light 

soil |' ; | e, l."> and 6 per cent.; lighl 
soil pipe lit tings, 50 and 5 per cent . 
medium and extra heavy pipe and fit- 
tings, 65 and 5 per cent.; 7 and 8-in. 
pipe, Oi and 5 per cent. 

BRASS GOODS. The discount on 
standard valves has been reduced from 
65 per cent, to 60 per cent. ; on patent 
quick-opening valves from 70 to 65 per 
cent, ; on square-head brass rocks from 
(in to .").") per cent., and on square-head 
won corks from 60 to 50 per cent. There 
is an excellent demand for all lines. 

IU [LDING PAPER.— A big fcrade is 
noted. Dry fibre quotations aire correct 
ed to 55c this week, instead of 50c, for 
ii.rrlv given in error. We quote 
as follows : Tarred felt, $1.85 per 

leu Hi.; 2 plv ready roofing, 95c. per roll; 
3-ply, $1.20 per roll; carpet felt, $2.30 
per 100 lb.; dry sheathing, 40c per roll ; 
tar sheathing, 50c. per roll; dry fibre 55c. 
per roll ; tarred fibre, 65c per roll, K 
and 1 X L, 70c per roll, heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton ; slaters' felt, 
65c. per roll. 

P01 I.TIIN NETTING. A moderate sale 
reported. \n advance is predicted by some 
dealers. Prices are nominally at 60 per 
cent, for 2-in. mesh, 19 w.g.; and 50 per 
cent, for 2-in. mesh, 16 w.g. 

SCREEN DOORS. -Business has been 
more active. Prices are steady. We quote : 
Screen doors, common, 2 or 3 panel, wal- 
nut stained, 4-in. style, $6.80 ; stained, 
yellow or green, $7 ; in natural colors, 
oil finish, $8.15; 3 in. style, - J( lc. per doz- 
f i\ less 

PLUMBING FIXTURES.- A fairly good 
demand continues at unchanged prices. 

RUBBER HOSE— A fair trade is report 
ed. Lawn standard is now quoted at 
•").',<• per ft. for .'.in. and ('>.',(■ per ft. for 
fin. 

FORK II \NDI.KS.- There is an active 
business at the new discount, 50 per cent 

PRESSED SPIKES, The demand is 
less active. We quote per CWt. 

as follows : \ in. x 1, l.\ in ., $4.75 ; 5 16 
in. x 5, (i in.. $4.50 : 8-in x 6, 7, 8-in., 
$4.25 : 7-16 in. x 7. 8-in., $4.10 ; .', in. x 
9, 10. 12-in., $3.90. The discount is 20 
per cent. 
TINWARE AND BNAMELYi \KK The 

demand has been active, especially for 
such lines as are used for preserving 
purposes. Prices an- unchanged. 

WOODENWARE.- There is still a good 
business doing. Prices arc stead] as 
follows : Washboards — Victor, $1.25 ; 



Newest Artistic Ideas 



iririri*ir 

ir 
i> 
* 

ir 
ir 



Are embodied in the decorations 
found in our 

METALLIC 
CEILINGS AND WALLS 



They make a most beautiful interior finish, and in addition 
are so practically durable and sanitary that it is easy to undeistaud 
their immense popularity. 

You can't aflord to miss the big business assured by handling 
these lines, can you ? 

Metallic Roofing Co., Limited 



TORONTO 



MON rREAL 



WINNIPEG 



ir 
* 
ir 

* 
ir 
ir 
* 
ir 
ir 



ir ir ir ir rtr ir ir ^? ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir ir iririr 



Crown. $1.30; Improved Globe, $1.45; 
Standard Globe, $1.55 ; Original Solid 
Globe, $1.70; Superior, solid back, $1.85; 
.Jubilee, $1.85; Pony, $1.05. Tubs Mo. 
ii. sill ; No. |, $8 . N a -2, ST ; No. 3, $6. 
i i: \l ENT. Prices arc unchanged 

throughout, a good trade being done. We 
quote in carlots, Toronto, as follows: 
Canadian Portland $2.50; German, $2.40 
to $2.50; English, $2.30 to $2.50 ; hy 
draulic, *l.50. Small quantities are 15 
to 25c. higher. 

METALS. 

The market is, as it has been for some 
time, in a State of indecision, at least as 
far as buyers are concerned.' Canadian 
pig iron producers, realizing that to "go 

after" business under the present eon 
ditions would entail granting concessions 

which they argue arc unjustified in view 
of the fact that they have as many ord 
ers as they can fill during the aexf two 
or three months, are not seeking orders 
and accepting only such as are given at 
ruling prices. Other metals have at la<( 

Followed on this market the reductions 

mad.- on the primal v markets during the 
past few weeks. Till, tcriic and bright 
tinplates, tinned sheets. black sheets. 
Canada plates, and copper are all ma 
teriallv lower. The demand has mi 

proved over last week, the activity being 

well distributed over all lines. 

PIG IRON'.— Holders and buyers seem to 
be about as wide apart as ever. I he 

moulders' strike has undoubtedly reduced 
the consumption in many foundries 
throughout Ontario while others are buy- 
ing steadily. The outlook is difficult to 
analyze. Buyers are holding off, the 

great majority onlv taking what is a I 

ed immediately. Producers are not forc- 
ing matters, however, as they have or- 
der- well ahead and are content to wait 
the developments of the next few months. 

Siiinnierlee is now reported at $23.50 for 
N,, 2, Toronto, otherwise there is no 
chance. We quote fob. Toronto. Ham 
ilton and Midland. No. I. $22: Sydney. 
No I. $20 . Mo I. -I arrow. $21 . Mo -' 
Summi rlee, $25 

'211 



BAR IKON. There is a fairly good de 
mand. with prices well maintained. 
The base price is now $2, For extra . 
cut to length while rolling: 2 ft. and 

over. Ill,-, per 100 lb.; I ft. and under 2 
ft., 15c; under 1 ft., 20c; over 2d ft., by 
special agreement, according to length 
and si/e. 

STEEL BOILER PLATES. Prices are 
6c lower. There is a fair demand. The 

base price is $1.96 f.o.li. Toronto. 

TOOL STEEL. \ good nude con- 
tinues in this. We quote as fob 
" B C" and " Black Diamond,'' 10 to 
lie; Jessop's, .Morton's and Firth's, 
I lc; Jonas iV Colver's, III to 20c; ditto. 

Air Hardening," 70c per lb.; I 
Leonard's, 8 to 9c; Park's " Silver," 12 

tO lie; Park's " Special," 15 to 20c. 

MACHINERY STEEL. The activity 

continues, with prices firm at §2 to $2.05 
fob. Toronto. 

COKE. — In good demand. Quotations 
range from $6.75 to $7.15 for 72-hr., and 
$5.50 for 4S-hr. furnace coke, f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

BLACK SHEETS. There is a 

movement. Prices have fallen 15 to 25c 

throughout. We quote: In to 16 gauge, 
$2.25; 18 to 20 gauge, $2.70; 22 to 24 
gauge, $2.90 ; :!n gauge, $3. 

CANADA PLATES. There is an im- 
provement in the demand, yet the move 
ment is still light. Prices are 20 to 25c 
lower. We quote : All dull. $2.70 ; half 

polished. $2.'85 ; and all-bright, $3.60. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. The demand 
continues excellent. Prices arc fairly 
steady. We quote Queen's Head. 34JS0 
for 2 s gauge J American, $4.40 for 21 
gauge ; Bell brand. $4.30 for 28 ga 
Gordon Crown, $4.50 for 28 gauge. 

TIN. A reduction of 50c is noted on 
the local market. Outside markets are 
weak. The demand is for small lots. 
We quote : $32.50 to I 

TINPLATES. Both coke and charcoal 
plates are 15 to 25c. lower. The demand 
is improving. We quote: Coke plates. 
bright, I 1x20, $3.85 charcoal plates. 

tcrne. 20x28, 112 sheets. $8 

COPPER In j. a is still in trood de- 



// \RD\VARE AND METAL 



■ out 

:ik We qll- 

ami sheet copper, 821 

and in 
-■lit. 
I |' \r, fairlj stead) 

, 100 lb 
■ bar lead. 

IRON PIPE \n excellent trade con 

|j \\r quote : 

ii |3 15 ; 
H 65 . , in . $2.85 ■ 

- " 25 . I i i < 

- . ■'. J m . |20 : 

i . 886. 
/I\( SPE1 I I- i; There is a fair de 
II lota at 6\ to t'..\c per tl>. 
ZINC SHI I' rS. \ fair business is do- 
II way. We quote base 
,Hows . Cask lots, 86.75 to *7, 
and part casks, 87 to s . .25. 

ni'i: In erood demand. Pikes 
are unchanged. Guaranteed half-and-half 
is quoted at 18 to 19c, and wiping IT to 
1 8c. 

OLD MATERIAL.. 

I'll. -iv is a fair movement in practically 

all lines. Prices are Bteady. Dealers 

quote ; Heavy copper and wire, I I fcc. 

lb.; light copper, 10c. per lb.; heavy 

red brass, I0$c. per lb.; heavy yellow 

per lb.; light brass, 6c; lead, 

ap zinc, 3Jc.; iron, No. 1 

wrought, 814 per net ton; No. 2 

wrought, 85; machinery cast scrap, -516; 

Btove plate, 811 ; malleable and steel, 

old rubbers, 6ic. per tb., and coun- 

try mixed rags, 50c. per 100 lb. 



CONDITIONS IN THE GREAT WEST. 

MR Taylor Webb, the representative 
in the Great West of the Thomas 

Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited, has 
been spending a few days in the East, 
visiting Montreal and Toronto. In reply 
to a question of "HARDWARE AM) Metal" 
in regard to the transportation problem 
Mr. Webb said : "There is one thing I 
noticed in the newspapers the other day, 
and that was a statement of Mr. McNichol 
of the C. P. R. to the effect that'they had 
now sufficient equipment to handle the 
crop in the Great Northwest. It would be 
welcome news indeed if this were true, 
but I know that the jobbing trade find it 
next to impossible to get delivery of goods 
in anything like reasonable lime, and this 
state of affairs is general throughout the 
Northwest. It is not now a matter of the 
cost of freight rates that most concerns the 
people. It is what transportation facilities 
they can get. " 

"What about the crop outlook when 
you left Winnipeg ? " 

"The crops looked well. The time 
w hen a general failure of the crops might 
take place is I think now past in the Great 
West. What I mean i^ that the acerage 
i-> now so large and the wheat growing 
area of the country so much wider that 



while in one part of the COUntrj there may 

be damage in others the crops will be 

uninjured. We have recently had excellent 
rains and a good crop i> now assured lor 
the present year." 

"What is the Feeling with regard to the 
Grand Trunk Pacifit t 

"Little or no concern appears to be 
manifested in regard to the eastern portion 
of the proposed line. What we are prin- 
cipally concerned about in the West is the 
construction of the line in the Great West 
in order that the transportation faciltlies 
oi the country may be increased. The 
business men are anticipating good results 
when the road is in operation. It is the 
general opinion that even with the three 
roads each will have all the freight it can 
handle." 

"What is the condition of trade ?" 

"Trade is very good in Vancouver, but 
it is rather quiet in Victoria and on the 
northern portion o\ Vancouver Island on 
account of the lock out in the mines. 
Trade in the Kootenays is still quiet on 
account of the recent strikes. No doubt, 
however, with the bounty on silver lead 
ore there will be some revival in trade. 
The lumber trade in British Columbia is 
simply wonderful on account of the de- 
mand from the Territories. All parts of 
British Columbia where lumber is an in- 
dustry, benefit is being derived from this 
demand. From Kootenay Landing to 
Fernie, quite a number of new saw-mills 
are being operated and they are kept 
going night and day. The shingle trade 
in British Columbia is however rather 
quiet on account of over-production. The 
outlook for Alberta is most promising, in 
fact I think Alberta has the most promis- 
ing outlook of any of the provinces in the 
West. The land is admirably suited for 
mixed farming and the coal supply is un- 
limited. It is true that most of the coal 
is of the lignite variety, but deposits of an- 
thracite have been found in parts ot the 
country running from Anthracite to Red 
Deer." 

Mr. Webb, who resides in Winnipeg, 
left for home this week. 



HARDWARE JOBBERS CONVENE. 

The Wholesale Hardware Dealers' .As- 
sociation held a session in (lananoque, 
Out., on Tuesday and Wednesday. Several 
important matters were considered, but no 
decisions reached are yet ready for publi- 
cation. All the members of the association 
speak in high terms of the reception and 
entertainment provided them by the manu- 
facturers of Gananoque. 
30 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word 
first insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion; 
cash \n advance. Letters, figures, and abbreviations 

each count as one word in e6timatiiiK cost. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



BO I I. E R M A K K R — First-class boilermaker 
wanted at once ; highest wages paid. Box no 
11 IRDWARE AM' METAL, Toronto. f 

HARDWARE clerk with brains and who is not 
afraid to use them, also his hands. State ex- 
perience, salary and send references. Box 44 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. (29-1) 



H 



ARNESSMAKER at once. Apply Box 109 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. f 



w 



ANTED — Three or four good sawmill hands. 
Box in Hardware and Metal, Toronto, f 



MACHINIST wanted, lathe hand. Reply, stat- 
ing wages, experience, etc., Box 101 Hard- 
ware and Metal, Toronto. f 



M 



OULDERS, stove plate, room for a few good 
men. Box 102 Hardware and Metw f 



SALESMEN wanted for "Auto-Spray"; best 
automatic, compressed air hand sprayer made ; 
big demand ; liberal terms ; sample machine free. 
Box 106, Hardware and Metal, Toronto, f 

WANTED — First-class brass moulder, accus- 
tomed to light work. Box 103 HARDWARE 
and Metal, Toronto. f 

WANTED — As clerk in hardware store — young 
man ; two or three years' experience ; refer- 
ences and salary required, Box 104 Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. f 

\\,*ANTED — Tinsmith — good steady employ- 
' » ment ; wages S2.50. Box 105 Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. f 

WANTED — A handy man accustomed to drill- 
ing and general stove work ; steady employ- 
ment. Box 107, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. f 

WANTED — For wholesale hardware specialties 
— thorough, practical, experienced man to 
look after stock, orders, buying, etc. Good oppor- 
tunity. Write, giving outline of experience, to 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 28-2 

WANTED — Canadian Meter Co — Gas meter 
makers and tinsmiths. Address Box 172 
Windsor, Ont. (29-3) 



Hardware and Metal 

has inquiries from time to time 
from manufacturers and others wanting 
representatives in the leading business 
centres here and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their names 
and addresses placed on a special list kept 
for the information of inquirers in our var 
ious offices throughout Canada and in 
Great Britain without charge. 

Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal atul Toront 






Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



A I. 'I 'IK >UGB ni a hanlu are, unlike in 
.1 drj goods store, there is not a 
verygreal necessity tor the expend 
it ure of much m< »ney in i be w Lndow 
brimming, a -merchant should not con 
elude thai all expense is unneces 
There are various seasons of the year 
when a special display is advisable, 
as Christmas, Thanksgiving', I b ter, and 
possibly, Victoria Daj and July 1st. The 

first thr iccasions should be celebrated 

in every store, and, as the public are al- 
ways watchful at those seasons for extra 
display, no window that is worthy of 
notice will be passed. 

For these I rims money should he ex- 
pended, as a mere arrangement of the 
. no matter how careful or how 
striking, will not be conspicuous enough 
top the pedestrians on the sidewalk. 
Special backgrounds or fixtures will have 
to be made use of, and, although a very 
good display can be made with very little 
moiir\ and a n inventive mind, the money 
is a part of it that cannot be over- 
looked. 

However, it is uo1 only for such annual 
events as these that some little expense 
is a good investment. Merchants can 
ordinarily use their window space satis- 
factorily by using only the goods thcni- 
selves as adjuncts to the display. But, 
at various ti s through the year, whe- 
ther taking advantage of any historical 
or local event or not. an extra trim 
should be indulged in, and something out 
of the ordinary done to show that there 
is still a living and interested influence 
in the store ; otherwise the passers-by 
will think that the merchant is perfectly 
satisfied with his business, and considers 
any extra effort to attract trade as a 
useless expense of money or labor. 

Such an impression is one of the most 
disastrous to a business, and no matter 
how large a trade may have been done, 
its influence will soon be felt. If people 
see a store has no interest in them, they 
soon cease to interest themselves in the 
store. Constant and substantial effort 
must be employed in the best business to 
retain its position, and in the poorest, 
to obtain a position ; and it is just as 
neeessary to the former as the latter. 

It is through his window that the mer- 
chant who realises this necessity impics 
ses the public with the idea that he is 
after its trade, and to get it is willing 
to exert himself. Not only docs the win- 
dow reach his customers, but, more than 
that, all who pass. A regular customer 



can be retained l>\ personal attention, by 

w ell kept si oel. , ii\ l'oi >il liii me mel u 
od in addition to the influence of the 

window ; l>ut it is onl\ in the latter way, 

combined w ith ad- ei 1 1 ing, that I 

who do not enter (lie store, can be 

reached, and, more effectual!] in 
ways than advertising, it attracts atten 

tion. 
Mr. \. may have dealt for years with 

the store across the way, but a Carefully 

arranged window may draw to hi 



A Window Display Competition. 



► 



HARDWARE \\i> Mb i ai . for the encour- ♦ 
agement of tasty window displays, has ftV 
decided to open a competition for its sub- fr 
scribers. Prizes will be awarded for photos *fr 
4^ °r drawings of window displays and accom- ^ 



panying descriptions 

prizes will consist of: 

first Prize - 

Second Prize 

Third Prize - 



of the same. The 

$10 

$5 

and $2 for every picture and description 
which is considered worthy of publication. 
The competition, which closes on Sept. 1, 
will admit of photographs, pen and ink or 
wash drawings, with good ideas counting 
more than the picture itself, although, of 
course, all pictures in order to receive a 
prize, must be of sufficient distinctness and 
good workmanship to admit of their pub- 
lication. 

There is no progressive merchant but has 
at least one window a month that is worthy 
of entering this competition, and the prizes 
are so arranged that, even if a window does 
not win the $10, $1 or $5 prize, it may be 
awarded a $'2 prize, provided only that it is 
of sufficient merit to publish in the columns 
of this paper. This award will cover the 
J5 cost of the photograph and there is no reason 
2? why any merchant should not obtain it. 
2? The number of photographs or drawings 
TV submitted by each store is not limited, nor 
J* is the number of 82 prizes ; a merchant may 
2? win a dozen if his pictures merit them. 
2? Should any intending competitor not know 
2? how to take a window picture, this paper 
25 will be glad to furnish him with instructions. 
2i In general terms, it may be stated that the 
X early morning, when the light is clear, when 
2jj few people are abroad and when there is the 
2j least reflection, is the best time to pholo- 
2? graph the display. A good photograph can 
2? also be taken at night by the aid uf an 
2J electric or flash light. 

tention an article, which is either a spe 
cialty of the store displaying it, or, 
which has never before received his con- 
sideration. If he decides he requires, or 
wants it, the chances are that he will 
buy it where he saw it displayed, rathei 
than across the street, and a beginning 

has then I n made m the obtaining of 

his trade. He may buy only that article 
at the time, Imt he will never forget that 
Blank supplied !>is wants at one time, 
and the chances are exceedingly good 
that Blank will do so again. 
:il 



1 uoh men a the* pi al di play 

is the onlj thi and if a 

half do/en like him can be induced to 
buy once, rarely the monej expended on 
the extra effort has been well -pent \ 
couple of dollai pu1 in a window may 
retui d fiftj to the till, even directlj . and 
when the indired moral benefit i- conoid 
ered, the - Even 

ere direct return able, 

the indirect, it they could be computed, 
would show a large profit to the met 

chant. 

Corner Windows. 

A corner window is one of the most 

valuable assets a merchant can have, and 

there are few who do not appreciate it 
importance. He is fully alive to the fact 
thai d opens great opportunities for win- 

dow display and has the immen-e ad 
vantage of catching the eye of a pa 
by long before he has reached the 
In this way the man outside is not 
polled to stop and look at the display, 
but can see it a- he walk- along, and 
without turning his head. 

Such a window well arranged is -un- 
to attract people who would not bother 
to look at or would carelessly pass a 
straight front, and yet there is not one 
merchant in many who understands the 
knack of turning all its opportunitii 
advantage. 

In a vague way he Knows that the -ide 
elevation is important, but in some way 
lie cannot get rid of the idea that the 
front elevation of the same window n- 
quires a more elaborate trim. Such is 
not the case. It i- the side window that 
attract- the eye, and it is that part 
of the window that gives a corner win 
dow it- value. Accordingly it stands to 
.a that it should receive the most 
at tent ion. 

The best plan to adopt is to place the 
central figure a little to the side ami far 
enough back to be seen from the 
without being interrupted by the corner. 
Then the part Been from the side should 
lie the most carefully arranged, with the 
front aspect more as a good support than 
a- the display that is intended to count. 
The observer will stop on his way up and 
naturally look at the side next him . 
when he reaches the front, the window 
- the entrance should be elaborate 
enough to give value to the front 
so that no matter from what position he 
looks at the window, be sees an effective 

displa\ 



H«rdw«rr «nd 
Mr-i-l 




REMEDIES FOR SOME STOVE TROUBLES. 



1) i position where all com 

) Lting to hot air heating 

ulating boilers in connec- 
nli kit. hen ranges, which come to 
our house are referred to inc." writes II. 
K |t m The Metal Worker, "I notice 
that there are rarelj two cases affected 
by tli'- same cause. I also notice thai 
there are fe* cases caused by large 
troubles. Thej are generally the case 
of -email oversights, which the ordinary 
dealer is unable to locate, all of which 
troubles the average dealer is able to 
rectify when the cause has been pointed 
out to him. 

\ dealer, to remedy a trouble, no 
matter how slight, which has once been 
established in the mind of the operator 
of either a furnace or a ranee, must use 
a certain amount of diplomacy in cornier 
lion with his mechanical skill in order to 
effect a complete and lasting cure. For 
example, to simply tell a cook she does 
not know how to build a lire or operate 
.1 range means to ruffle her temper, and 
to thereby heap real trouble upon the 

_ :iar\ trouble, and possibly call forth 
from her a rebuke, such as, ' Young man. 
I made tires before you were horn,' or. 
' I have done just as you are doing,' &c. 
I find the best and most practical way 
i- to bank the tire and open all the cov- 
er.-. <.. a- to cool down the lire as much 

a- possible while you are making your 

examination. And then when yon • are 
satisfied in your own mind that every 
thing is a- it should be. call attention to 
tlie low condition of the lire. After re- 
p lacing the cover- open up all the drafts 
and carefully raise the body of the fire 
with a straight roker, so as to admit 
plenty of air. Then, while the fire is 
liurninc/ no. ask the cook to make a few- 
biscuits, as you would like to try an ex- 
periment. When the bottom oven plate 

becomes hot enough to siz/le at the 
touch of a wet finger, put in your bis- 
cuit-, and they will be done in from 15 
to I s " minute- Taking them out you 

can. by this practical demonstration, 
convince the cook that everything is all 
right, and the remedy is sure to be com 

plete. 

"'jhiite recently I had a peculiar case 
brought to my notice \ customer 

boughl a new range to replace an old 

one. which had outlived it- usefulne 
a baker, yet which could not be excelled 
for makinp plenty of hot water, it hav- 
ing a [rood sized water back, which was 
connected to a 30 gallon upright boiler. 

The plumber disconnected the circulating 

pipes from the old water back and con- 

1 up the new water back in the new 



range, jusl a- the old one had been, us 
ing the same old circulating pipes, which 
were of lead. the lower one having a 
draw cock to enable the sediment to be 
drawn off when necessary. Some hours 
after they had started the lire we were 
-cut for to explain what had been done 
to cause hot water to come out of the 
cold water spigot the water was even 
hot in the hopper of the water closet in 
tin 1 bathroom. As there had been no 
change made, other than as stated alcove, 
(he plumber was naturally mystified and 
had to conjure a good deal before locat 
ing the trouble. The lower circulating 
pipe from the water back being made of 
lead, the original plumber had cut a hole 
in it to put in the draw cock and the 
end of the draw cock, slightly obstruct 
ine the passage, prevented a small ball 
of mud which had formed in the bottom 



Heating and Tinware 
Issue. 

In next week's issue of Hard- 
ware and Metal special attention 
will be devoted to heating and tin- 
ware matters. Any information re 
these subjects would be appreciated- 

Advertisers are requested to send 
in copy of advertisements by Mon- 
day, at the latest. 



of the boiler from passing through the 
pipe. This formed a trap, preventing 
the water from circulating as it should 
have done and thereby producing a re- 
verse circulation. When the ball of mud 
was removed, allowing the circulation to 
take place, everything was restored to 
its natural condition." 



TURNACE PRICES TO THE STATES 

BUT little investigation is needed to 
discover that during several years 
there has been less fluctuation in the 
prices of hot air furnaces than in almost 
anything else that is made in the foun- 
dry. Apparently this branch of trade 
has been free from combinations. and 
various efforts to secure some sort of an 
association among furnace manufacturers 
have met with little success, notwith- 
standing that some conditions existed 
that could be improved with advantage 
to all concerned. Whatever beneficial in- 
fluence the stove manufacturers' associa 
lions have exerted on that branch of 
trade has doubtless had some good effects 
on the furnace trade owing to tie elo.-e 
alliance of interests between them. Some 
manufacturers state that they are satis 
lied with the returns secured for tlnir 
enterprise ; others, who realize the diffi- 
culty of effecting a change in the condi- 

32 



tions. if not satisfied, aie enduring with 
patience the lack of disposition that 
seems to prevail to secure improvement. 

Among the furnace manufacturers there 

.ire not wanting successful men of busi 
n, .ss sagacity and sound judgment, who 
complain that the returns in this branch 
of trade are by no means commensurate 
with the expenditures, and that many re- 
forms are needed in prices secured and in 
methods of marketing. They 'hum that 

there are main constructions on the mar 

kef which are simply a menace to the 
best interests of the furnace trade and 
which should be eliminated, and (lev 
realize that (his can only be aceoin 

plished gradually through association. 
Notwithstanding these conditions the 

furnace trade has not I n without its 

compensations. Close observers 'are 

aware that the low prices at which excel 
lent furnace systems could be secured for 
several years past have caused the de- 
mand for the best class of hot air fur- 
naces to keep steadily increasing. The 
fact that these furnaces are profit pro 
ducing has induced manufacturers and 
salesmen to push their sale, and this has 
resulted in inciting many of the smaller 
furnace contractors to learn how to do 
first-class furnace work. — The Metal 
Worker. 



A NEW METAL POLISH. 

Geo. W. Grant & Co., Esplanade east, 
Toronto, oil dealers, are making a metal 
polish which they believe to be the best 
on the market. Tt is put up in half 
pint, pints, quarts, half gallons and gal- 
lons, and can be put in barrels if desired. 
The makers inform us that almost every 
big boat entering the port of Toronto 
uses this polish for their brass work. In 
Toronto offices, banks and warehouses 
have also proved excellent customers. 



NOTES OF THE TRADE. 

Campbell Bros. and A. J. McArthui . 
tinsmiths and stove dealers, Perth, Ont.. 
are having their stores repainted. 

<■'. bund. Victoria, has taken out pat 
cuts for a gas-stove, the object of which 
is to provide a new and improved heater 
attachment for gas heating and cooking 
stoves arranged to carry all obnoxious 
Bfases out of a room, and at the same 
time utilize the heat to the fullest ad- 
vantage for heating water and air in the 
room. 

E. Campbell. Rossland, B.C., has pat 
ented an apparatus for a smelting-furnace 
the improvement in which relates partic-u 
larlv to the water-jacketing- construction 
of the furnace and to the novel construe 
tion of the receiver. including the 
tapping jacket and slag spout . The in 

ventor aims to construct the furnace of 
wrought iron, replacing all cast-iron 
w atcr jackets. rings, etc.. with Ranged, 
wrought-iron jackets and to avoid seams 
and rivets where molten metftl comes in 
direct contract therewith. 



Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That'g uh;it a shell braokel i* fur. 
For i Ins purpose thereoan be [TOTiiim Bi 
ikf(, Nothing Cheaper ilmn the BRADLEY 
BTEEL BRACKE1 n li well Japanned 

and Light. The laving in freight bag I profit, 

aside from the lower price al irhiohthe goods are 
sold. Order dlreol or through your jobber. 

ATLA8 MFG. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 





HARDWARE AND METAL 



Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 

SELLING 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove 4 Hardware Co. 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 



Slaw cutter, 



.'<,rn I 



l A 

. POPULAR 



I J 



I'iit fcpplli .1 foi 




J. M. MAST MFG. CO., Lititz, Pa. 

Edwin H. Grenfcll & Co., London, Ont., 

CANADIAN AUENTS. 



DIAMOND STOVE PIPE DAMPER. 

US Patent Jane 35th, 189S . Canadian Patent December 14th, I8H3 




Made by 

THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, Guelph, Ont 



Imperial Standard Scales 



For fine workmanship, 
accurate adjustment, 
strength and durability, 
there are no Scales 
quite equal to the 

IMPERIAL 
STANDARD SCALES 



Portable Platform Scales 
Iron Testing Machines 
Butchers' Scales 
Grocers' Scales 



Scales of all capacities for all |)ur|>o*cs, 
for use in any business. 

Railway Depot Scales 
Railway Track Scales 
Wagon and Stock Scales 
Hopper Scales for Grain 
Dormant Warehouse Scales 
Flour Mill Scales 
Dairy Scales 
Druggists' Scales 
Miners' Scales 



Everything from a Letter Scale, weighing ' . ounce, 
to a great Railway Track Scale, weighing 100 tons. 

#«S~ Our Name on any Scale is a {guarantee of Hig'K Quality. 

Made at HA/HILTON, ONT., by 



& 



Have you teen our new Illustrated catalogue (100 pages)? If not, write for It. 

33 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




rttiur, Corneille & Co. 



MONTREAL 



Glue and Gelatin 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 




Raw and Boiled 



"GUARANTEED PURE" 



rlANtrACTURID BY 



Canada Linseed Oil 



MONTREAL. 




s 



LIMITED 



g3" BARRELS WANTED! 



We are open to buy good sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 




OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories. 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



Boeckh's 
Flexible Bridled 
Brushes 



win the admiration of every practical painter be- 
cause of their genuine merit, and are therefore 
the most profitable for the dealer to handle. 



BECAUSE 



The l>riclk ran easily be removed and replaced 
The bridle is not affected by water, oil or paint. 
The bridle works on a pivot :m<l thus k*- ps the bristles elastic. 



— If you have not received our handsome Illustrated 1903 
—Catalogue, send us your name and address on post card. 



UNITED FACTORIES, 



Mead Office : TORONTO. LIMITED. 

MONTREAL BRANCH: I end 3 DeBresoles St. LONDON BRANCH: 71 Oundas St. 



34 



Hardware »nd 



'■ 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



THE VARIED USES OF ROSINS. 



R( is, I \ is like pet roleum ; it is a 
thousand things a Proteus under 
many different aspects. The Ger 
mails and French mask it under the pu 
culiar name of sound glue ; the word 
"sound" is here used in its aco 
sense, aot in its antiputrid one. In 
other words thej call it colophony. It 
is, however, tar more easj to gel the 
tongue round "rosin," and it is a pity 
pedantic' writers on technology do not 
mend their manners, and call a spade a 
spade, instead of an agricultural imple 
ment. This word colophon) is derived 

from the Use to which it is put by fid- 
dlers, whom, uyain borrowing from the 
li, we must nowadays, forsooth, 
teem violinists. Hut even "colophony" 
i- altogether preferable to "resin." 

Rosin, though derived from a resin, is 
not a resin ; if anything, it is a "pilch." 
Ill fact the term, "pitch." is applied to 
a resinous substance with less claim to 
it than common rosin. vi/., to Burgundy 
pitch. Another and Very ancient use of 
rosin is in the making of cobblers' wax. 
But leaving the tiddler and cobbler alone 
for the mom. nt to practice their arts in 
peace, we come to its use in the factory. 
The belt has just come off a pair of dis 
integator pulleys going at differential 
speed, and round and round without re 
pose, round and round the lis wheel goes, 
until it is hurriedly stopped in its wild 
eareer by the engineman, who comes out 
of the engine-room to see what has hap 
pened this time, with a scared face and 
hair on end, while some half dozen or 
more laborers shouted simultaneously. 
"The strap is off !" v little rosin 

sprinkled on the belt would have saved 
this from happening. 

The use of rosin by the plumber in 
soldering is well known. But it is, per- 
haps, not so widely known that the yel- 
low color of good common yellow house 
hold soap is due to rosin, and also its 
rather pleasant smell. 

During the- American Civil War the 
soap makers were verj hard pushed for 
rosin, and it was then actually dearei 
than tallow. The French rosin made the 
smell of bad fat made into soap worse 
than tile first. 

Again, a great deal of lampblack is 
made by burning rosin in a confined at 
mosphere, and we are indebted to rosin 
for our cheap halfpenny newspapers, be 
cause rosin not only supplies the black 
pigment, but also the oil vehicle by 



means of which it is applied as printers' 

ink to I he paper \loreov er, the - ame 

rosin oil is used as a vehicle to print 

colors more pleasant to the eye than 
Common lampblack. 

Rosin ml, made r>\ distilling common 
has many uses beside: thai of a 

print ing ink. The great I be la, for in 
stance, found it to be the greatesl elec 

trie insulator in existence. Mixed with 
blue keel and red keel, it makes the fancy 

sheep marking brands which are so ex 

tensively used in New Zealand anil \u 
tralia. 

\eain. mixed with one or two percent. 
of quicklime in the form of lime water, 
it forms the rosin . . . ,f which hund 

reds of tons used to be exported before 

the war to Delagoa Bay foi use in the 
Transvaal, not before, be it well under 

stood, the crease had been reduced to 
the extent of from one third to One-half 
by means of gypsum. Rosin, again, 

either in its original condition or as 
rosin oil, is one of the chief ingredients 
of sheep dips and sanitary Maids. \ 

soap made from rosin and soda alone is 

extensively used in bleaching linen and 
calico, and also in paper making, in 
which industry it is known as rosin si/.e. 
Rosin dissolves easily in 'most varnish 
solvents, such as turps, methylated spir- 
it, coal tar, naphtha, and petroleum 
naphtha, and these solutions, when col 
Ored with an aniline (\\r are used to 

adorn the toys of generation to genera 

tion of children. A petroleum naphtha 
solution of rosin is used as a vehicle foi 
suitably tinted barytes, as a paint for 
ships, iron drums, keg etc. 

If rosin be heated with a metallic oxide, 
such as lime, litharge, or the black ox 
ide of manganese, it dissolves these me- 
tallic oxides, combining with them to 

f . .tin the SO-Called metallic rcsinate-. 
The combination of rosin with the oxide- 
just named, or mixtures of these, are 

sold as drier- for varnishes and boiled 
linseed oil. They arc grossl) abused in 
the oil trade, it paying well to load a 
boiled oil with these "resinates" but the 
oil boiler would be grosslj insulted if you 
were even to hint that his boiled oil con 
tained rosin, and that he had added a 
"rosinate" and not a "resmale." 

These rosinates may also be mad.- in 
the hv. bated condition by precipitating 

a solution of rosin in caustic soda by the 
corresponding metallic -alt Copper sul 
phate, foi instance, cue- a line ; 
35 



1 1. r : .ii. h a a I in anti fouling com 
• a l'.\ adding aniline dye to tne 
solution of rosin in causl >da, and 
then precipitating with a magmesium, 

calcium, barium, zinc, or aluminium -all. 

a dyed n. inate i produced, which can 

be di- ..bed in Linseed oil, imparting it 
., iloi t bei 

The use and nbu-e of 1..-111 111 -pint 
varnish and 01 1 v urni-h manufacture 

I.... well known to i. •.pin.- description. 

Linseed oil can be converted into a me 
tallic linoleate ; there i-, therefore, do 
i introducing a metallic rosinate 

into boiled ling I oil. 

It will be -en that the -ub-tance DAS 
virtues of its own ; it is a pitv. there 
lore, that it should be used for put | 
foi' w Inch it is not adapted. 

These an- but a few of the many uses 

of rosin, which tends i and more 

everj daj to become the "barytes" of 
thi' varnish maker. As to rosin oil, it 
is pai- excellence the animal ami vegetable 
oil adulterant of an age in which adul 

Pi at i. ui ha- become a line .ul I ..■ ! n . 

however, no1 forgel to mention the roBin 

spirit produced simultaneously with the 
rosin oil. and so much U8ed a- an adul 

teiant of. and substitute for spirits of 

turpentine. Oil and Colourman's I 

mil 



T 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 
MONTREAL. 

J^IHHOH the demand for linseed oil 

keeps up the supply is very larg >, 
and a drop of 3c. is noted this 
week. Order- for round lots are being 

shaded from this price and a further .!.■ 
.line is likely. Turpentine is lc. higher 
than last week. and is linn. Shellac 

gum is very linn and considerably highet 
The price of shellac mav be advanced In 
to lac. | er gallon. Ike general makes 
of varnish are steady with an under- 
current of strength, due to the firm feel- 
ing in turpentine. There -'ems to be 1,0 
let up to the inquiry for Paris green, 
particularly in the West, though a few 
lots are also being shipped to the eastern 
provinces, where, apparently, the potato 
bug has been later in arriving. I he 

midsummer dulness has not as yet over 
taken the paint and oil trade, and the 
inquiry for white lead, mixed paints an I 
painting material- generally remain- mi 
abated. Some cutting is reported in 
white lead in Montreal, which, according 
to a well known paint man. i- entirely 
unnecessary, as there i- a '•■ n demand 
for all the lead that can be turned out. 
This doe in the manger policy," he 
says, " whereby the maker can't tret the 
profit on the lead himself and hinders 

others from I it also, is one that I 

can't understand " We ipi 



Hardware and 
Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



il \p WHITE II M' Be«* brands, 

landlord, $5 to 85.26 {*o 

2. 84.40 to 

14 . No. 4, 

all ( o.b. Montreal. Terms. 

■ oS for oash 

!U;\ Willi I IK \H $4.75 in casks and 
in i 

I>|;\ U III IT. ZINC Pure dry, in casks, 
i„ urn n No. 1, sine, in 

m LOO lb. kegs, 5fc. 

WHITE ZINC (ground in oil) Pure, 25 
It, ,. No. 1, 7c : No. 2, 6c. 

pi | \\ . We <|ii<>i<- : Bulk, in barrels, 
Sl.fiO . bulk, in 100 ft». packages, $1.85 ; 
in barrels, 11.90. 

ORANGE MINERAL. Casks, 7cr; 

II,. i smaller quantities, - 

i;i h | .i; \\) Genuine red lead, in casks, 
in LOO lb. kegs, 14.75 ; in less 
quantities, 85.75 per 100 lb. No. I red 
lead, casks, $4.25 ; kegs, $4.50 and smal- 
ler quantities, $5.50. 

1,1'I'U V i:« ; I Ground, casks, 5c.; in less 
quantities, 5£c.; flake litharge, .asks. 
$5 25 ; smalls. $5.75 per LOO lb. 

LINSEED OIL. Raw, I to I bbls:, 54c.; 
boiled, 57c; raw. 5 to '•» bbls., 53c.; 
boiled, 56c. Terms, net cash in 30 days. 
Delivered in Ontario, between Montreal 
and Oshawa, at 2c. per gallon advance. 

I i RPENTINE.- Single bbls., 7 1c; 2 to 
1 bbls., 73c. Terms, net cash in 30 days. 

BK\/.l\i: 25 to 26. 

SHELLAC VARNISH. Pure white, 
$2.20 i<> $2.35; orange, $2.10 to $2.25. 

MIXED PAINTS. $i.20 to $1.40 per 
gallon. 

CASTOR OIL. 8| to '■>.!<■. in wholesale 
liits. and V. additional for small lots. 

3E \L nil.. Is to 50c. 

COD oil. 35 to 37$c. 

PURE CAN \DI AN PARIS GREEN.; 
Petroleum barrels, I5jc. per lb.; arsenic 
l5J,c; 50 and LOO Hi. drums, Hie: 
25-lb. drums, 16^c.; I Hi. packages, 17c: 
.', Hi. packages, 19c; I lb. tins, |s,-. : j Lb. 
tins, 20c. 

I'l RE ENGLISH PARIS GREEN. 
Petroleum barrels, I lie; arsenic kegs, 
II 1 ,.-.; on ami 100-B). drums. I.V.; 25-lb. 
drum-. I"i.\c; I Hi. paper boxes, 16c.; 
I III. tins, 17. 



TOKOS II'. 

Generally speaking business is more ac- 
tive than usual at tl.i- season. Sundries 
are in good request, but the inquiry for 
whit.- lead, linseed oil and turpentine is 
reported to he moderate. Prices sho* 
uneasiness, severe cutting -till being re 
ported in all staples Gum shellac is 2 

to 3c. dearer. Other prices are, however, 

nominally unchanged. We quote: 

WHITE LEAD. Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead. $5.10 I" $5.25; N.,. I, s|.i;2.', to 
$4,874 : N " -■ 84-25 to 84.50 ; No. ■'.. 
s::.-;. to $4.12J ; n,,, i. $3.50 t,, $3.75 

in packages of 25-lb. and upward- ; .\e. 

pel- lh. extra will be charged for 12.;, In. 
packag nuine dry white lead, in 

casks, •-'." 

UI.D LEAD Genuine, in casks of 500 
II... $4.75 to $5; ditto, in kegs of LOO Lb., 
$5.25 1.. $5.50 : No. |. in casks ,,i 560 lb., 
si to $4 -'."i : ditto. in kegs of I'"' ih.. 
$4.26 t.. $4.50. 

LITHARGE. Genuine, 6 to 6£c. 



Wll III' ZINC Genuine, French V. M.. 
in casks; $6 t.i $6.25 ; Lehigh, in casks, 
si; t,, $6.25. 

SHINGLE -I UN. -In live gallon lots, 
tin to 85c. per gallon 

PARIS N II 111.. -90c. to $] per 100 lb. 

\\ III I INi;. 65c. per inn lh.; Gilders' 
whiting, 80c. 

GUM SHELLAC. In oases, 38 to 40c: 
in less than cases, 12 to 15c. per lh. 

LIQ1 ID SHELLAC Pure orange, in 
hlils., $2.30 t.. $2.40; white. S2.:15 to 
$2.45 per gallon; in less quantities, 10c. 
extra. 

GLUES. Broken si t. in 200 lb. bbls., 

B to si,-. p,. r il,.- cabinet glue, in bbls., 

IH to L2c.; emery glue, in bbls., L7c; 

bookbinders', ground, 10-J-c; finest Amer- 

white, L9c; No. 1 American white, 

15c. per lh. 

PUTTY.— Madders, in bbls.. $2.10; 
bladders, in 100 lt>. kegs, $2.25 ; bulk, in 

bbls.. S|. Ml; bulk, less than bbls. and up 
to 100 lb.. $2.05 ; bladders, bulk or tins. 
less than Hill lh., 32.75. 

PARTS fiREEN.-Petroleum bbls., 13 to 
I"' 1 .. p.i lh.; arsenic kegs, ]•''..', to I 5 .',<•.; 
.".ii and inn II, . drums, I 1 to Hie.; 25-lb 
drums, I i. 1 to Hi.\e.; l lh. packages, 15} 
i.. IT.-.; .', lh. packages, 17 to 18c; L-lb. 
tins, 16 to 18c; - 1 , lb. tins, 17 to 19c. 

PLASTER PARIS;.— New Brunswick, $2 
per barrel. 

I'l MICE STONE. -Powdered, $2.50 per 
cwt. in bbls. and 1 to 5c. per Ih. in Less 
quantity : lump, LOc. in small lots and 
8c. in bbls. 

LIQUID PAINTS.— Pure, 31.20 to -I'M 
per gallon; No. I. 31.10 per gallon. 

BARN PAINTS.— 65 to 70c. per gallon. 

OASTOE OIL.— English, in cases. 8 Lo 
9c. per H,.; and to 10c. for single tins. 

LINSEED OIL— Raw, 1 to 2 bbls., 58c; 

boiled, file.; :', to 5 bbls., raw. (iOe.; boil- 
ed, file, delivered. To Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. 2c. less. All quantities 
of 10 bbls. and over of linseed oil wold 



only f .o.b. Toronto. Hamilton, London 
and Guelph. 
TURPENTINE. Single bbls., 75c; 2 to 

:'. bills.. Tie. delivered. Toronto, Hamil- 
ton and London. 2e. less. For less (plan 
tities than barrels, 5c. per gallon extra 
will be added, and for a gallon packages, 

50c .nid 10-gallon packages, 80c. will lie 
charged. 



WINDOW GLASS. 

MONTREAL. 

The market for elass is fairly active at 
present and several good orders have 
been received this week. There is no 

change in price, which is steady as fol- 
lows : First break. 5o ft., s2 ; second 
break. 32.10 for 50 ft., first break, 100 
ft., $3.80 ; second break. 31 ; third 
l.r.ak. $4.50 : fourth break, §4.75. 

TORONTO. 

A moderate business is doing at un- 
changed prices. We quote : Star, under 
26 in.. $3.80 ; 20 t<> lo in., si ; n t., 50 

in.. SI. 50 ; 51 to 00 in., S|. 75 ; 01 to 70 
in.. $5 ; 71 to 80 in., $5.50. Toronto. 
Hamilton and London. Terms, four 

months. 



CANADA PAINT CO S COLORS 

The colors of The Canada Paint Co. 
are noted for strength and fineness. 
That they are appreciated abroad as 
well as at home is shown from the fact 
that The Canada Paint Co. are shipping 
this week to the Old Country 15 tons of 
painting material, and weekly shipments 
are made to the United States. For 

bridge, girder, elevator and railroad 
work the manufactures of The Canada 
Taint Co. are particularly recommended. 
Books of samples will be mailed free upon 
request. 



THE REAL TEST 

of a FIRST-CLASS PAINT is how it wears and how it keeps its color. 

"ANCHOR" LIQUID PAINT. 

has been wearing well, looking well and giving satisfaction 
for the past thirty years. 

The mere fact that BRANDRAM'S B. B. GENUINE WHITE 
LEAD is the only one used in its manufacture is sufficient argument 
of superiority. 



*° B **4 




HENDERSON & POTTS 



% 



TRADE MARK 



ESTABLISHED 
1874, 

Halifax and 

Montreal. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE LATE JAMES COOPER. 

Mr. James Cooper, one of the best 
known merchants in Montreal, died on 
Saturday, July l l, after an illness of some 
three weeks. Mr. Cooper is known to all 
ttardwaremen, having been Rrsl with 
Rice Lewis A- Co., of Toronto, and later 
with Frothingham 4 Workman, as a 
traveller, on which duties his genial dis- 
position made friends for him throughout 
the trade in a large section of the country. 

1 1 was in l s7 J that Mr. Cooper started 
in business for himself, and afterwards, 
when Mi Fred. Cooper entered the 
In m, ii became known as Cooper, Fairman 
4 Co. Heavy hardware was the chief 
line, inn the firm became afterwards the 
pioneers in die manufacture of barb wire 
in (his country. This part of the business 
developed to such an extent that it became 
a separate corporation under the name of 
The Dominion Wire Co., of which Mi. 
Cooper became president. The linn taking 
up a patent for wire rope also made a SUC- 
• vss of it and founded what is now The 
Dominion Wire Rope Co.' Mr. Cooper 
became president of thai company also. 
In The Dominion Bridge Co. the firm of 
Cooper, Fairman & Co. held the control- 
ling interest up to 1889, when the linn 
dissolved, though the senior partner re- 
mained a director of the bridge company. 

A great deal of sympathy is expressed 
foi Mrs. Cooper, who was in England at 
the time of his illness and only arrived by 
the steamship Cedric at New York on the 
day of liis death. 



The funeral look place on Tuesday, July 

II, and was one of the most large!) 
at tended thai has been Been for some time 

in Montreal. 



CONSOLIDATED LAKE SUPERIOR CO 
A Philadelphia despati h savs ; " Direi 
tors of The Consolidated Lake Superioi 

Co. are said to have assurances that the 
proposed 110,000,000 bond issue will be 
successful, and that sin Ii bonds as the 
stockholders do not take will be taken bv 
financial interests in this city and New 
York friendly to the company. They are 

confident they will lie able to redeem the 

securities which have been deposited with 
the Speyer syndicate, and to thus avoid a 
receivership and the loss of the control of 

the properly. 

" The real import of the statement that 

the bonds imt subscribed will be otherwise 

disposed of by the directors was nol under- 
stood until tO-day's early raid on the stocks 
of the company, during which they touched 
the lowest price on record. After the 
Statement had been digested the feeling 
£Ot abroad th.it (he company had provided 
for all contingencies and had been assured 
that any part of the bond issue declined 
by the stockholders would 1 e taken up by 
friendly hands. This belief strengthened 
the situation and the day closed with the 
belief that the property would yet be saved 
to the Philadelphia investors." 



Mill factory hands, of Vancouver, have 
gone back after their strike. 



TRADE 



lobbies # Ho are. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers ot 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 




Manufacturers of FINE READY-MIXED PAINTS, 
FLOOR PAINTS and VARNISHES, and WHITE 
LEAD. Full line of best DRY COLORS, OILS, 
and all PAINTER REQUISITES always in stork. 
Send f >r prices. 




The Globe Paint Co., 

Limited 

422-424 Adelaide St. W., Toronto. 



SPECIALTIES 

THE CANADA PAINT CO. 



LIMITED 





SOLE M4KERS 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 



Hardware and 
M*Ml 




FREQUENT CONFERENCES ARE DESIRABLE. 



U ' lould be one of tlu- greatest 

\\ ts derivable from the con 

ventions held from time to time 

by tl Plumbers' Association is 

ill.- between the manufacturers 

and f»uppl) men and the association. 

•Even in this age of enlightenment there 
to be a woeful state <>f misunder 
standingtbetween the two parties. The 
manufacturers imagine on the one hand 
that tin' chief aim ami object of the ad 
Bociation i- t<> try ami act the besl if 
tlii'iu ; mi the other hand, members of 
the association are under the impression 
thai the manufacturer and supply man 
live to take advantage of him. [his 
-taw- of affairs is not in the interest of 
either party. That a great deal of good 
has been done <>n behalf of the craftsmen 
>iin •!■ the organization of associations 
there can be uo question. There never 
was a time when better work was turned 
out than is tinned out to day. This, of 
course, is due to some extent to the 
fact that municipalities have passed by- 
law > regulating plumbing. It mast be 
remembered in this reform the master 
plumbers took the initiative ; they it 
was who urged the- passage of such by- 
laws. Sot only did they assist in hav- 
ing the very best by-laws adopted, but it 
has always been their desire to carry out 
the principles of the law. No law is 
better adhered to than this. Individual 
K , the master plumber could have done 
very little along this line. it was only 
a< an organization that force could oe 
added to the request. While this and 
other reforms have been enacted, there 
i> no doubt that much of the good that 
could, and that should, have been derived 
from banding together has not bejii 
accomplished. A great factor in this 
state oi affairs i- the lack of unity be- 
tween the supply and demand. Each 
other'-, motives are not understood. One 
of the main reasons for this is that the 
parties do 11 ■ . t come together often 
enough While they may meet individu- 
ally they only come together as a l>ody 
when there i- some grievance, some com- 
plaint to discuss. Sleeting at all times 
under these conditions, is it any wonder 
that the reception i-. "Well, what i< your 
trouble now; what charge have you u<>t 
to lay ?" 

What should be of great benefit to lioth 
parties is stated meetings. The two 
partiec Bhould come together under favoi 



aide circumstances as well as unfavorable. 

I. el each other see that while you are 
not in business for your health nor are 
you looking solelj alter your own inter- 
est, you have the welfare of each other 
at heart. The manufacturers, even, From 
a selfish motive, would be benefitted by 
assisting the interests of the plumber. 
Indirectly he is helping himself. On the 
other hand it is to the plumber's interest 
to aid the manufacturer. The time has 
come when the association has become a 
power and can very materially assist 
the manufacturer and supply man who is 
looking after his interest, and the time 
lias come when it is to the interest of 
the manufacturer to assist in cementing 
the master plumbers together. 

In speaking before the recent convention 
at Montreal, representatives of the manu- 
facturers stated that they and the Mont- 
real association had not come together 
since the former convention held in that 
city three years ago. 'I hey (the manu- 
facturers) inferred from that, that there 
was no further good to be accomplished, 
that perfection had been reached ; no th- 
ine had been done that was wrong. The 
.Montreal association certainly not only 
want to interest themselves, but also 
the manufacturers in trade benefits.. 

Looking at the situation from an im- 
partial point of view one is forced to 
admit that the state of alfairs does not 
bear out the inference. The association 
have scarcely got a look at the promised 
land, let alone taken possession. For- 
merlv the meetings between the manufac- 
turers ami supply men and the associa- 
tion at convention times was a sort of 
"jollying" time. Everybody was a "jol- 
Ij good fellow ;" the association had 
nothing but "jolly'' for the manufacturer 
and the manufacturer on his side had to 
return the compliment and ''jolly'' the 
association. In fact it was a ''jolly" 

hour spent together, Any little errors 
that had been made on either side were, 
of course, of the head and not the heart 
and an " all is fore i veil but never let-it- 
occur again" sort of a feeling prevailed. 

All very nice, but scarcely business like. 

However, the receni conference showed 
thai the matter had resolved itself into 
a business proposition. If wrongs exist 
let us L .,t together in a business way and 
adjust them. It is up to the association 
to take advantage of this condition of 
affairs and meet these gentlemen on a 
38 



business basis. Suggest frequent joint 

tings, m>t to right wrongs, but to 

prevent wrongs. "Prevention is better 

than cure." "A wound niav be healed but 
the scar remains," "Lock the stable be- 
fore the horse is stolen." Meeting ivith 
this feeling uppermost, how much more 
benefit will be derived. The manufac- 
turers and supply men are coming to 
gether, which will make it possible to 
have these conferences, which ought to 
result in good to till parties. 



LOWER DISCOUNTS ON BRASS 
VALVES. 

A reduction of 5 per cent, in the dis- 
count of standard and patent quick-open- 
ing valves and in square head cocks, has 
advanced the net price of these goods 
more than TO per cent, to the trade. 
The reason given for this substantial ad- 
v ance by the manufacturers is the in- 
crease in the cost of raw materials and 
of labor. This demand has, too, been so 
heavy that it seems likely purchasers will 
not hesitate to pay the advance. The 
discounts now are : Standard valves, 
(in per cent.; patent quick-opening valves, 
65 per cent.; square head brass cocks, 53 
per cent.; square head iron cocks, 50 per 
cent. 



TORONTO DELEGATES' REPORT. 

The delegates representing the Toronto 
Master Plumbers' Association, who had 
attended the recent convention in Mont- 
real, gave a report of the proceedings at 
the regular meeting of the association on 
.Monday night . The report met with the 
approval of the members. President 
Ross received the congratulations of all 
on his elevation to the position of 
National vice-president. The association 
are determined to give the National a 
good reception next year. Jno. R. 
Bolam, of Parliament street, was 
initiated. , 



A GOOD GAME OF BASEBALL 

Teams representing the Master Plumb- 
ers and the Journeymen's Association 
met at the Woodbine Park, Toronto, on 
Saturday afternoon last when a very 
interesting game was played. As a 
glance at the score will show, the 
victorious journeymen had no walkover. 
Every innings was played by contract and 
not by the hour, the consequence being 
that all spare time was utilized. The 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



VARNISH 
REMOVER 
PAINT 
REMOVER 



A Painter Will Pay 

a price for what will save him time — don't you 
think so ? He buys a gallon of Vam-Off for 
$3.00 and that gives you a nice profit ; with 
it he will take off more varnish from any 
surface in two hours than he could rub off or 
scrape off by the old way in two days — that's 
business isn't it ? 



Send for sample 



VARN-OFF 



and try it yourself. 



A. RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



PAINT 
MAKERS 



The New Century Ball-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 



l H0l5£H0 LD 




Not the cheapest but decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tuhful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L.. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, 



Limited. 

Eastern Agents. 



+++++++++++++++++' 




+++ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ H^++++++++++++ + ^+++++++»-f • 

THe Man wHo Pays 
for tKe Coal 



is the man who buys the furnace. He wants a house-warmer, not 
a coal-eater ; so he is going to study the matter very thoroughly 
before he decides. When he comes to investigate the merits of the 

Oxford Hot Water Heater 

we give him every assistance. Newspapers and magazines keep 
telling him the different points in which the Oxford excels all 
other heaters on the market. Our profusely illustrated booklets 
complete the sale. So the sale is really made when the prospec- 
tive customer comes to you -that is, if you can supply him with 
the Oxford Hot Water Heater. 



ISi GURNEY FOUNDRY CO., Oml 



ited 



WINNIPEG, 
THE GLRNEY-M4SSEY CO., Limited, 



TORONTO, CANADA, 



VANCOUVER. 



»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦■++- 



MONTREAL. 

■++♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



39 



H>rriwar< 
Mrl.1 



HE ATI SO AND PLUMBING 



ue were 1 1 1 • - batter) "t 

be « l-v im • atching 

.•I Fullerton for the n.aM. r plumbers. 

both teams were oul in 

full ton.- and clever plays were applaud 

isly. 

01001 1001 I 

002004101 8 

I Wright, Lyndon, 

MrHullen, Adams, K. 

it. lull.i -ton. HcPherson. 

Joti Vbbot, W . Gray, t\ 

Row, Andrews, Kemp, 

Nicholson. 

PLUMBING AND HEATING NOTES 
I'll.- Belleville Gas Co., Limited, Belle 
ville. (hit . are offering their plant for 
sale l.\ tender. 

IY»ronto building laborers have decided 
turn to work, ai't.-r being on strike 
I I «.vkv They return at their old rate 
• >f pay, -•").-. per liour. They struck for 
30i . were offered 27.U-.. but refused it. 
Now, many <>f them arc unable to get 
work at 25c, their places having been 
filled. The carpenters of that city have 
also decided to "call off" their strike, ad- 
mitting their defeat. 

The plumbers of the State of Oregon 
an- using their influence to have the law 
I at the last session of the Legisla- 
ture put into operation in all towns 
having a population of l.'OOO or more. 
The law requires that all master plumb- 
ers shall be examined by a board for a 
certificate of competency before they can 
secure a license to carry ob the plumbing 
business. The law requires that the 
Mayor of such cities shall take advan- 
of the act within 30 days after its 
I assi 

BUILDING NOTES. 

J. Fraser Gregory, St. John, N.B., in 
building a. thoroughly up to date 
mill on the site of the oi o burned. A 
joint stock company will probably be 
formed in which Messrs. J. V . Gregory 
and \V. II. Murray arc likely to be the 
moving spirits. 

E. Sylvain, Quebec, intends repairing a 
building on St. Francis street, to the 
amount of 8500. 

G J '.rant i- now effecting extensive 
repair- to one of his properties on 
D'Youville sti eel . Quel 

Mr. Ouellet, architect, Quebec, hae re 
turn.-d from St. Alexis de Metapedia, 
whither In- had [rone to prepare plans [or 
the interior of the church there. 

it is likely that a n«-w immigration 
hall will In- built iii Winnipeg, Man. 

'I he 'I II & B. Railwaj have taken 
out a permit for the erection of a large 
addition to their freight sheds on Main 
-tr.-.-t. Hamilton. It will 900. 

A new SI I. brick chiii.-h is to be 



limit at Portage la Prairie, Man., by the 
Disciples of Christ. 

Phomaa Smith, of Willoughbj ave 

Poronto Junction, has commenced 1 1.<- 
erection of a large brick house at the 
cornel of Bumberside and Western ave 
lines. 

TREASURER F. G. JOHNSTON. 
Mr. I-'. G. Johnston, who was elected 
treasurer of the National Association, is 
verj popular among the craftsmen. Ib- 
is at the head of a Verj successful liusi 




K. (i, JOHNSTON, 
Treasurer of t he National Plumbers' Association "t ( 'anada 

tless in Ottawa. and his selection met 
with hearty approval. He will be a 
valued member, of the Executive Commit- 
tee. Mr. Johnston has always been a 
firm believer in the association. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS WEIGHTS 

Tn view of the interest aroused by the 
decision of the manufacturers of boil 
pipe and fittings to discontinue the sale 
of light soil pipe and fittings after tha 
end of this year, the following schedule of 

weights of pipe and fittings has ! n 

kindly prepared for "Hardware and 
Metal" by one of the leading manufac- 
turers. We understand this is the first 
list of this nature that has been compiled 
and believe it will he of value to the 
trade. The list is as follows: 



BUILDING PERMITS ISSUED 

TORONTO. 

M. \. (lark, two stony dwelling east 
side of Delaware avenue, near Hallaiu 

avenue, to COSl 81,200. 

!•',. B. brown. two storey brick dwel- 
ling, Nanton crescent, to cost $4,000; 
Eden Smith, architect. 

\\ . C. Fox, alterations l<> office, south 
east corner of Scott a nd Colborne streets, 
to est g] ,800 : E. Et. Babington, archi 
tect. 

I''. S. Duff, tvv o storey and at tie dwcl 
ling, 586 Shaw street, to cost $1,800. 

F. II. Bauinliard. detached dwelling, 
west side of Gladstone avenue, near Dun 
das street, to cost $2,000. 

('. R. S. Dinnick, two storey brick and 
stone dwelling, north west coiner of lilt 
pout street and Bernard avenue, to cost 
$3,500; also dwelling west side of Ber 
nard avenue near Dupont street, to co I 
$2,800. 

.1. T. V. \lav pair semidetached stone 
and brick dwellings, east side of Concord 
avenue. near College street. to cost 

$4,000. 

A. E. Gooderham, two storey brick 
stable, corner South Drive and May 

street, to cost $4,000 ; I). Roberts, u relii 
tect. 

HI l.\\V.\. 

John II. Ferguson, solid brick addition 
on Albert street, to cost $1,200. 

Simpson Fleming, brick veneered dwcl 

ling on Lloyd street, to cost $5,000. 

Malcolm McGregor, brick veneered dwel- 
ling on Maple street, to cost $800. 

Sir K. Cartvv ri-jht . solid brick addition 
on O'Connor street, to cost $1,500. 

T. Et. Grace, solid brick dwelling on 
Goulborne street, to cost $5,000. 



FIRE ESCAPES. 

McGregor&lVflcIntyre, Limited, Toronto, 
equip buildings throughout Ontario with 
fire escapes. Tbis business lias grown 
without much forcing, which speaks very 
well for the makers. This firm deals with 
local architects and builders, taking con- 
tracts for structural and ornamental iron 
work. 



•LIGHT. MKIUUM. 

in. in. in. in. in. in. in. in. in. 

Size inches 2 3 4 5 6 2 3 4 5 

Length of pipe, feet 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 

Wt.ofpipe. lb., per ft.. 3* 454 6* 8* 10* 4 6 9 13 

'/Bends, lb., each.... 4 5W 8 10 14* 5 (\H 10 12* 

3 4K 6 8 11 3H 5* 7% 10 

'A ••.. 3 4K 6 8 11 3* 5* IX 10 

T Branch " " .... 4 8 10 15 20 5* 10* 15 20 

Crosses " " .... 5 10 12 16 24 7* 15 is 24 

Y Branch, " " .... 5 9 13 18 25 7* 12 19 25 

*Y 4* 6* 10 14 16 6K 10 14 19 

Dbl.Y 8 11 18 26 37 10 15* 25 34 

Dbl.hubs, lb. " ....3 4 6 8 10 3K 5* 7 9* 

St. Sleeves, " " .... 2* 4 5 6 7 3'/ 5 6 7* 

Traps, " " .... 5* 10 19 26 35 7* 14 23* 35* 

K' dm-ers, " " 3 I 6 s .. 3* 5 7 

Light offsets 2 x gin.. 5 lb. 3 x s. s IS. 4 x 12. 15 lh. 

Medium offsets 2 x 8 in , 7 lb. 3 «s, 1 1 & lb 1 x 12, 191b. 

Extra heavy offsets 2 x .Sin., 9 1b. 3 x H, 151b. 4 x 12, 23 lb. 

I his size is the one which will not be made after the new year. 

40 





1 


EXTRA HEAVY. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. in 


6 


2 


3 


1 


5 6 


5 


5 


5 


5 


5 5 


15 


5* 


9* 


13 


17 20 


17 X 


6 


s 


12 


15 20 


13* 


4X 


6'/ 


9* 


12 16 


13* 


W, 


6K 


9* 


12 16 


27 


7 


13 


20 


25 34 


36 


10 


20 


24 


32 48 


35 


10 


15 


2.) 


32 45 


23 


9 


13 


18 


21 311 


48* 


12 


20 


32 


42 60 


12 


4* 


7 


8 


11 14 


8* 


4 


6 


7 


9 10 


51* 


9 


is 


28 


45 68 


9* 




4 


6 


s 11 


5 x 


13.20 ii. 


6 x 


s, 22 11, 


5 x 


12, 25 


lb. 


6 x 


8, 30 lb. 


5 x 


12, 30 lb 


6x 


s, 38 lb. 



Portland Cements 

BEST 

German, Belgian and English Brands. 

Fire Bricks, 
Fire Clay, 
Flue Linings, 
Drain Pipes, 
Hard Wall Plaster. 
Calcined Plaster, 
Wheelbarrows, 
Mortar Stains. 



A FULL STOCK OF 



BUILDERS' and CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 

W. McNALLY & CO. 

40 to 52 McGill Street, 

Corner Wellington St., 

MONTREAL 

Write for oar quotations. 

Any Firm in Canada 

Installing a plant in which 

COPPER and 
BRASS 

enter to any extent should 
certainly confer with us. 

THE BOOTH COPPER CO., 



119-123 Queen St., p:ast 
TORONTO- 



Limited 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



rSrqoUo Arte S\)t\£ 
ifH A figfri ANP 

fl«fi.e 0as£. , ' > 

DO YOU*? 

rirertisement 
in the <fr 

Tof^OrJ-fO 
wit I bring you, 
9 JrjS tendcrs/rem thi 

Jril a J, fast contractors 







Want Ads. 



In tliis pa|>er com I word each 

m, payable strictly cash with order. 
Muiiy large business deali have been 
brought about through advertl 

words. Clerks can be secured, artl 
>ld mill exchanged, al itnall i 
dlture, Don't forget t<i tend itan 
postal order when sending to copy, when 
replies come In our care B cents additional 
iini>t Ih' Included for forwarding sunn-. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., limited 
Montreal and Toronto 







BUILDERS' SUPPLIES 



Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, etc. 



ALEX. RREMNER, hsi Montreal, Qne. 




5IVENS Firearms 



DEPENDABLE. 

ACCURATE. 

DURABLE. 



ASK YOUR JOBBER 




SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



A constant 
demand for them 
makes the 
"Si i.\ ins" a 
profitable line to 
handle. 



v 

i 

t J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., p ° 2 *°* Chicopee Falls, Mass., U.S.A. | 
♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦-«►♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ «►♦♦-♦ ♦-♦•♦-♦■ ♦♦♦ • ♦-•►♦♦ ♦♦♦♦ *+++*.+ + + + + + + + + . + + + + + + 

H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING. 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Made 




DURING 
THE 
HOT 
MONTHS 



Hardware dealers and plumbers will tind that quite a little business can be created by 
handling the 

ACME I10T WATER HEATER. 

This heater operates by t, ra> > works almost instantaneously with small gas con- 
sumption, allows an excellent profit and gives great satisfaction to the user. 

We've a little booklet describing the several styles of these healers and we shall 
be glad to send it to you. 



The JAMES MORRISON BRASS MFG. CO., Limited, TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRADE IN COUNTRIES OTHER 
THAN OUR OWN. 



PORTLAND CEMENT IN GERMANY. 

T 7 SIRED SI \ I I • s Consul General F. H. 
Mason, Berlin, has given ;i valuable 
ding the Portland ce- 
ment industry in Germany. In it be 
that the production <>f cement in 
the years from 1890 to 1900 was phe- 
tive, with the tesull that 
in 1901 there was a surplus of ovei 10, 
009.000 barrels, <>f which only 506,652 
were exported, the result being a crisis 
from which the industry lias not yet re 

covered. Th sment factories of the 

countrj are divided into several syndi 
cates, which fight each other with great 
keenness. It was expected that the Mid- 
land Canal through Germany would be 
authorized and the cement factories made 
preparations to meet the additional de- 
mand, so the failure and postponement of 
this project were among the contributing 

causes to the over -production of that 
period. An attempt was made to unite 
the syndicates and restrict the output-. 
but this attempt ended in failure. 

The vear 1902 brought no substantial 
relief. The supply of cement everywhere 
exceeded the demand. Building opera- 
tions slackened under the general indus- 
trial and financial depression, while labor 
and fuel— two of the principal factors in 
cement nroduction— maintained practical- 
lv undiminished values since the prosper- 
ous years preceding 1900. The only out- 
let for the surplus was through exports. 
and these slowly increased from 497. 780 
metric- tons in 1898 to 528.676 tons in 
.513.991 tons in 1900, and 641,520 
tons in 1902. Of this large export the 
United States takes a larger share than 
anj other nation, the shipments to that 
country aggregating 197.171 tons in 1900. 
108,596 tons in 1901, and 216.726 tons in 
1902. Next in order of importance in 
this respect comes the Netherlands, which 
last year took 66,837 tons of German 
cement : British South Africa, 36.720 
ton- : Great Britain, 33,534 tons; and 
Brazil, 18,209 tons. 

Under the present tariff, cement is free 
of duty when imported into Germany, 
and there was a small influx of 51,947 
which came across the bor- 
der at points iii Belgium, Denmark, 
Prance. Vustria, and Switzerland, where 
factories near the frontier were geogra- 
phically tributary to German territory. 
hut out tlii- slight competition the 
new German tariff imposes a duty of 50 
pfennig- (about 12 cent- i per kilogram 
($1.20 per metric ton) on cement, as 
against 84.04 per ton duty assessed by 



Russia, S2.38 in Austria and Switzerland, 

SI. 42 in Sweden, and si. 76 in the l nited 
Stat- 

The sum of all recent information is 
that only the oldest and largest factories 
in Germany, which enjoj every advantage 
of location for obtaining raw material 
and handling their product, are able un- 
der present conditions to earn any sub 
stantial profit ; many <>f the newer and 
smaller establishments are working at a 
loss. Early in the present scar there 
was a meeting in Berlin of cement manu 
facturers from till parts of the Empire, 
which, after a long, secret session. ap- 
pointed a commission to consider and 
report in April upon a plan for the or- 
ganization of the entire industry under a 
cartel. or syndicate, which should control 
output and manage the' market. Thus 
far it would appear that the commission 
has not reported, and its continued si- 
lence is construed as an indication that 
the differences between local syndicates 
and individual factories have again been 
found irreconcilable, and that no general 
basis of combination can be reached. 

THE WIRE OUTLOOK IN THE UNITED 

STATE". 

Tt will be remembered that it was dur- 
ing the third quarter of 1902 that the 
severe cutting of various independent 
manufacturers of wire and wire products 
began to have an effect in diverting ton- 
nage to the independents, to the extent 
that in October the leading interest made 
drastic cuts all along the line. First 
there was a cut of 5c. a keg on nails, 
then another sweeping reduction of 
15c. on nails, 20c. on plain wire, and 30c. 
on galvanized wire products. This at 
once threw business to the leading inter- 
est, and meanwhile the Union Sharon 
purchase was made. Then on January 
2 a straight advance of 5c. a hundred all 
around was made, followed on February 
23 by a further advance all around of 
10c. a hundred, since when there has been 
no change. 

This makes the present market, as com- 
pared with official prices of a year ago 
5c-. a hundred less on plain wire and wire 
nails, and 15c. a hundred less on galvan- 
ized products. 

There is now some expectation (hat 
the market may move in the same direc- 
tion this Kail a-s it did last Fall, and we 
review the price- movements of the past 
year to show what bearing they have. 
With plain wire and nails onlv 5c. below 
prices of a year ago, it is not so improb- 
42 



able that prices may come down, but in 
tin- case of galvanized it docs not seem 
-«■ probable, since prices on such lines 
me already 15c. less than a year ago 

The present stat.- of tin- market is that 
there is not a great deal of new business 
going, although there is a large volume 
nuclei- season contract, Mills an- holding 
\c-r\ strictly to prices, but are able to 
make shipments on new business very 
promptly, which seems to point to their 
holding prices mainly in order to protect 
the business now on their books. There 
have lie-en some reports of shading on tin- 
part of large jobbers. American Metal 
Market, July 1 I. 

THE PITTSBURG IRON MARKET. 

a special correspondent of The New 
York Journal of Commerce writes from 
Pittsburg: A careful review of the ac- 
tual conditions existing in the iron trade 
to-day shows that the outlook for the 
last six months of the year are of a de- 
cidedly encouraging nature. This country 
is producing pig iron at the present time 
at the rate of 1,750,000 tons a month, or 
19,000,000 tons a year, a much larger 
output than England and Germany com 
bined. While more iron was made in this 
country in May than ever before in any 
one month (about 1,750,000 tons) yet un- 
sold stocks were less than 100,000 tons, 
or about a two-days' supply. This shows 
conclusively that our present enormous 
output of pig iron is going into active 
consumption and is not being piled up ill 
the furnace yards. In addition, the big 
consumers of pig iron have been buying 
regularly in the open market and in some 
cases have recently paid slight premiums 
in prices in order to get early deliveries. 

It is a fact that prices of Bessemer 
forge and foundry iron have declined 
about $3 a ton, but this has really put 
the pig iron market on a sounder basis 
than when prices were abnormally high. 

At the present time Bessemer pig iron 
is selling at $18 to §18.50 at the maker"s 
furnace, and at these figures the furnace- 
man has a profit of two to three dollars 
a ton. with which he ought to be well 
satisfied. The Southern furnace owners 
have reduced prices of both forge and 
foundry iron several times, but it was 
done to meet new conditions which came 
when the furnace owners could run their 
furnaces steadily and consumers were no 
longer held tip and made to pay exorbi 
taut prices for the iron they so badly 
needed. 

fhe pig iron market is quiet at the 
present time, but this is invariably, the 
condition in Julv and comes largely from 
the fact that many rolling mills and 
foundries are closed for repairs and to 
take stock and absolutely refuse to buy 
pig iron or anything else until repairs 
and stock taking have been finished. 

At the same time- there is no presSUTi 
on the part of the furnaces to sell and 
the market will move- along quietly Until 
well into August. when consumers will 
begin again to place- their contracts. Vo 
the knowledge of the writer not a single 
blast furnace in the Central West, where 
linn.- than 75 per cent, of the- entire pig 
iron output of the whole country is made, 
has been shut down because it has no 
orders on its books. On the other hand 
many furnaces have their entire output of 
pig iron under contract to October and 
some for a longer period. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hammocks 



mttM 




A post card will bring you our prices 
on Croquet Sets, Hammocks, Baseball, 
Tennis Goods, Toy Garden Tools, 
Paper Lanterns, Flags, etc. 

Nerlich & Co. 



6-84 FRONT ST. WEST 



(Opposite Union Station) 



Toronto 






¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 
¥ 

¥ 
¥ 
¥ 



u 



Hay-Time" with us. 



Huny f Wi'll, ratlnr. Vat iir 
ftVat I" 1 1 : i \ • • 

your htlltnciM. When t In- race l« 

swift It wimlil in, it iln for un lo 

drop behind 

Wh f BbOOldO'l B t in b k •• 

Win gen a 1 1 1 1 1 1; batter than 
othen ■ w ringer maklnj 
PFi-ii iiur hnxrinnnn, We an getting 
- .-in encouragement trow 
ide, and it would be the 
height of folly to tamper with ooi 
good name, Ami, beat of all, we 
have the expert knowledge, « 
love lor our work, an ambition. 

i odeed, li wonld be hard work to 
make a poor Wrtoger. Far easier 
t i make them good. 

Poi unique patents, for sound 
workmanship, for Wrlngeie that 

satisfy, your business BhOOld be 

with us. 



Send for Catalogue. 






CANADIAN WRINGER ail SPECIALTY GO 




TORONTO. 



Limited 



" «a -a -* -*-,i vi -*-*-*-*-*-*-*-*■,».-*-* •»' 



4 



LUXFER 
PRISMS... 



The secret of selling goods is 
to KNOW what a man wants. 



You WANTa GOOD, LIGHT STORE 



We KNOW it and can make 
it so for you. 



Do Not be Misled by Cheap Imitations. 



We can give you cheap glass. 
We will give you big value 
for every dollar invested in.. 

LUXFER PRISMS. 

DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO. 

100 King St. West, TORONTO. 

Montreal Agency : F. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig St. 



FOR 



GLASS 

STORE 
FRONTS 



We make a specialty of all glass materials for 
the latest, most up-to-date 

STORE FRONTS AND 

INTERIOR DECORATION 



WILL SEND DESIGNS. 



DISCOUNT TO TRADE. 



LUXFER PRISM CO., 

LIMITED 

100 King Street West, TORONTO 

Montreal Agency : F. T. Blennerhassett, 783 Craig St. 



4:$ 



H « rdw*re 
M^tal 



knd 



THE OFFICE 



DEVOTED TO THE 
OFFICE 5TAFF OF 
BUSINESS ESTABLISHMENTS. 



T 



Is it Necessary to Send Receipts? 

Bj j h a 
>1IK question of "the discontinuing of 
sending receipt* in acknowledgment 
oi all tonus of remittances, upon 
which tin- eadorsemenl of the re 
would be a legal receipt," Beems to be 
upon whi.h little can be said, cer- 
tainly little that may be termed new. 

This question was taken up by the 
house 1 have the honor to represent near- 
ly two years asro. It had been our cus- 
tom for some time previous to print on 
our remittance forms : " No acknowledg- 
ment neceesarj Having experienced no 
inconvenience from the practice, we con- 
eluded it could be extended to our cus- 
tomers, and so decided to try it. 

I believe we were the pioneers in this 
move, and now, after 21 months of ac- 
tual experience we are convinced that it 
was a move in the right direction. So 
safully has it worked that I have 
>et to see the lirst complication to arise 
from it. and vou can get an idea of the 
great saving of labor and postage to us 
thereby when I tell you that we acknow- 
the receipt of less than 10 per cent, 
of the remittances that come to us. 

However, it is impossible to eliminate 
altogether the formal receipt, for it must 
lie given in some instances, such as for- 
mal vouchers required by corporations, 
settlements with administrators, receiv- 
ers, etc. It is also our custom to ack- 
nowledge receipt of currency when the 
amount exceeds II, and, if a customer 
insists upon it, we send him receipts 
iily. In other words, if the ques- 
tion of business or no business hangs 
upon a receipt, we send the receipt. 

As another proposition, the present era 
in commercial life demands the introduc- 
tion of the most modern methods and the 
discarding of all practices which are un- 
ary or cumbersome, so long as it 
does not interfere with or retard the pro- 
of business ; in other words, that 
we take the shortest cut to reach a given 
point, and this principle applies to the 
credit man as well as to any department, 
for he must see to it that the machinery 
of his department works with the least 
ble friction and that the expense 
does not compare unfavorably with that 
of others, ami. a- we have already shown, 
the abolition of the sending of receipts, 
though comparatively small, is one fea- 
ture that counts. 

At this point I will digress to say I 
think it would lie well to incorporate 



some other features which are of a 
kindred nature, viz. : 

First. — Insist upon the customer re- 
mitting for specific charges. 

Second.— I'rue him to use a regular re- 
mittance form or make an intelligent 
statement* of the remittance in his letter, 
and then let him specify on his cheque 
the invoice it is intended to pay. 

The third feature will require some 
explanation. 

When this subject came up for discus- 
sion at The National Association of 
Credit Men of the United States, there 
\\ as an objection offered on the ground 
that the discontinuing of the sending of 
receipts would induce a customer to send 
his individual cheque instead of exchange. 

When paid and cancelled, the custom- 
er's cheque goes into his possession and 
can be kept as a record, but the cashier's 
cheque, of course, remains with the bank : 
therefore, if he has not the receipt, it is 
onlv natural that he should want his own 
cheque properly endorsed. 

This can be overcome by suggesting 
that the customer buy exchange in his 
own name, and then endorse it over to 
the firm he intends to pay, specifying, if 
he chooses, in the endorsement, the bills 
to be paid. Then, should any question 
or dispute arise, which is exceedingly 
doubtful, it is a matter of little trouble 
to obtain a complete history of the 
transaction by t>oing to the records of 
the local bank. 



Personal Interviews in Granting Credits. 
By Geo. H. Sheble, St. Louis, Mo. 

THE position of credit man in a large 
concern is not a sinecure, and at 
times is most unpleasant ; in fact, 
I have had gentlemen in other positions 
not nearly so prominent tell me that they 
would not have the place with many 
times their present salary attached ; and 
I assure you that I recently had two ex- 
periences when I wished I was almost 
anywhere else in the world but at the. 
credit desk. I was informed that a 

young lady, daughter of one of our cus- 
tomers, was in the house purchasing 
goods. Now, this customer was consid- 
erably behind in his account with us, 
and, supposing that the young lady had 
been given instructions, I sent for her 
and upon questioning her found out that 
she kept her father's books and was well 
acquainted with his affairs, but was not 
inclined to tell me anything about them, 
A I 



till I so positively insisted that she be- 
came offended and would say nothing. 

The other case was somewhat similar, 
the lady being the wife of a customer, 
and upon being questioned felt 60 much 
offended that she Bet up a good "cry," 
and then, being somewhat relieved, said 
that her husband, though his account was 
so far behind, was well able to pay, but 
that he gave the business very little at- 
tention, leaving it almost entirely to her. 
She, between her sobs, instructed me not 
to ship the goods she had just purchased 
—she did not need them, anyhow, and 
could get them somewhere else when she 
got ready for them. 

Now, such cases as these, I say, are 
anything but pleasant, and I hope none 
of you may be called upon to go through 
them. 

The credit man's duties are multi- 
farious, he having many things to do 
besides pass upon the fact that a pros- 
pective purchaser is good to sell upon 
credit or not. You know, it is often 
deemed necessary for you to go out of 
your office to meet a customer, acciden- 
tally, as it were, to "jolly" him— pat him 
on the back — make him feel at home — take 
him to a department and call some par- 
ticularly good salesman to handle him, 
because you know he likes this special 
attention, or is "cranky" in some way— 
and in many other ways depart from your 
legitimate line of work. 

One of mv most unpleasant duties is to 
decline an order, or "turn down" a buy- 
er ; for this, in most cases, "puts you 
in bad" with the salesman who would 
get credit for the sale, as he, nine times 
out of ten, thinks you are wrong — that 
you have made a mistake — though this is 
more on account of a prejudice he always 
has in favor of the customer, as he looks 
at the transaction from one side only— 
a salesman's standpoint. 

You must not harbor the idea, how- 
ever, that the credit man is never in 
error, for he, being human, is naturally- 
liable to mistakes and often makes them. 
for if he did not, his services would be 
invaluable to his employer ; in fact, he 
would be so much sought after that he 
could not take care of the many posi- 
tions that would be offered him. 

Then? are so many conditions to be 
considered in the granting of credit, 
more than I have time to take up here, 
that I will present but a few cases that 
have come under my personal observa- 
tion or attention, some of which were 



THE OFFICE 



ii< 



rdw*re «nd 



St. Margaret's College 

TORONTO. 

\ Boardhi( and I )aj 3ol I fori llrb, 

ii ugh courses in everj department 

Only teachers oi tbi bighi .1 toadaml ii Mid professional standing smployed, 



CBOBOB DICKSON, M.A., 

Dtrectoi 



Mils QEOEGE DICKSON, 

l.mly Principal 




Mr. G. W. Wccsc, 

Promises to give personal atten 
tion to all work given to our firm, and 
see that every Customer is pleased 
and satisfied. 

It is no trouble to quote prices. 

WEESE & CO., Printers 

.-, I YONOK ST. TORONTO. 



{ WHEN YOU STOP TO THINK \ 



I 
J 



how much the success of your business and the com- 
fort of your' household depend on communication 
with others you will appreciate the fact that tele- 
phone service is worth a great deal more than it costs. 
Metallic Circuit Service — efficient, rapid, constant 



i 
i 



I The Bell Telephone Co. of Canada 



FIRE AND BURGLAR- PROOF SAFES. 



Breal Hinn nftnn ouniri rnlintismi Protect agsdiut what may come 

by baying a 

CARY Fireproof Safe. 

We are the only Importers and Dealers In Canada of tin- oelebrated world 
famous Cary Safes. The only safe sold in Canada where the BUI 
warranted Dot to depreciate ; being ■ dry filling, will last a lid- tin., 
r. Blllng required when yon buj a Csry safe louble 

underlocklng, tongue and grooved < n ►< »r with asbestos packing, making 
them water and air tight, See our latest Improved up-to-date Safes before 
buying, Catalogues mid prices sent mi application, Money savi 
consulting 

Ford & Featherstone, 

IMPORTERS AND DEALERS, 

lO John St., North, - HAMILTON, ONT. 




Hallwood Cash Registers 



INDICATE 



Correctly 



AND 
EVERY DETAIL < 



Exactly 



Each Transaction. 

No other Registers will do 
this. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 

OFFICE AND WORKS: 

T8 and 80 King Street East, 

Toronto, Ont., = Canada. 



( ". 

The Empire Typewriter 




'Equal to any in 
every way, su/>c- 
rior toalloftbem 
in some respects. 

Permanent Alignment, 
Powerful Man! folder. 

Hardened Steel Type, 
Visible Writing. 

SEE THE EMPIRE 

at 61 St. Francois Xavier Street, 

OR WRITE TO 

THE WILLIAMS MFG. CO., Limited, 

p.o. box 2424, MONTREAL. 



45 



H«r*lw»ro And 

M. ,,1 

iK and some incorrectly diagnosed 

ms in which I was correct 
tde in personal interviews with 
the . uston.i i . and the eontrary, where I 
l upon the oredit from information 
obtained through various channels usual 
to tin- credit department, and from this 
fact it i- ui\ opinion that to decide upon 
credit it van be done much mote intelli- 
gent l\ from personal contact with ilu> 
parties than in any other way, and where 
ii.le I always insist upon it. 
a years ago a party by the name 
of John Smith came into our house, and 
the salesman for his territory being call 
ed, he learned that Mr. Smith wanted to 
purchase a small bill of goods, between 
J200 and 1*300, payable in (lit days, also 
informing the sale-man that Mr. So and 
So. a salesman for another house, ha I 
sent him there. Mr. Smith, being a 

Btranger, «a> requested to step in and 
interview the credit man. which he readi 
ly consented to <1<>. and on being intro 
duced, was requested to make a showing 
of his affairs, and to this made no ob- 
jection, though, at the same time, say- 
that his purchase would be small, as 
he needed but few goods just then. Tak- 
ing down my blank form, T asked the 
usual questions, and these are the figures 
ave : 

Stock in hand (insured for §2,000). .. .82.500 00 

Notes and accts. , all good 500 00 

Cash on hand 300 00 

Cattle, horse, etc 500 00 

Total assets $3,800 00 

And total indebtedness, all for Mdse. 
(none due) 1.198 00 

Giving him a net worth of $22,632 00 

Now, from these figures, this man, if 
honest, was unquestionably good for the 
quantity of goods he desired of us, but 
here i< where the personal interview was 



THE OFFICE 

the thiliLi. for. upon quite a long talk 

with him. alter obtaining these figures, 1 

informed him we could not sell him the 
goods, except upon a spot cash basis. 

The salesman was very much dissatis 
lied, and after considerable talk, and re- 
presenting that his friend's house had 
shipped him a much larger bill of goods, 

he succeeded in eettine the yoods shipped 
by an order from a higher authority than 

myself. I told this gentleman that if he 
talked to the man he would not have 
shipped him. and to show that my judg- 
ment was correct, the party failed in less 
than 60 days, and we succeeded in gett- 
ing -~> per cent, of our claim, less at 
toiney's fees. 

A few seasons ago the head of our Ar- 
kansas department informed me that 
Thos. Jones was in the house and told 
him that he had decided to transfer his 
drv gOOd8 purchases all to St. Louis, and 
would give our house his business if we 
would make prices right and we wanted 
to sell him. I'e was told that we did, 
and he started in to make his purchases. 
After a day or two our department man 
informed me that the party was buying a 
very liberal bill and 1 said 1 would see 
him. When he had finished buying he 
was brought to me and introduced. He 
was a clean cut intelligent man, ''full of 
ginerer," as it were, seeming to have his 
business well in hand, with figures at his 
tongue's end. and was very particular as 
to details, not overlooking the smallest 
items. He stated his competitor was a 
large advertiser and took full time on 
his purchases ; but he (my prospective 
customer) discounted his bills and took 
advantage of this advertising, being- able 
to sell the people brought into town by 
this means, at lower prices, thus getting 
the benefit of the business without the 
expense. These are his figures : 



Stock, $12,000 to $13,000 00 

Insurance, $7,500 

Hook accts 5,000 00 

Cash on hand 700 00 

Store bldg 1 JM) (X) 

Bank stocks, etc 1,600 00 

Total assets $21,800 00 

Liabilities : 

Mdse., none due $5,000 00 

Borrowed money 4,500 00 

Miscellaneous debts 1,000 00 10,500 00 

Net worth $11,300 00 

Annual business, $76,000 00. 

Now. here was a hustler, as you will 

observe from his sales ; lie turned his 

stock nearly six times per year, and was 

bound to slice 1. His bill, with us. was 

about $4,000, and promptly discounted, 

as he said it would lie, and he is to day 
one of our most valued customers. In 
the makino of this credit you will readi- 
ly see that the personal interview is 
again of great advantage, because with- 
out the many little points and conditions 
brought out by conversation. I would 
hardly have eared to ship his bill of 
goods, even had other information borne 

out his figures given. 

The cases to which I have especially 
called your attention are ones in which 
a personal interview took place, and I 
repeat that in my opinion a "credit" 
can be passed upon much more intelli- 
gently in this manner than in any other. 
The agency information or bank refer- 
ence may be prejudiced or given with a 
view of obtaining credit for the party, 
when, if the true conditions were known, 
and a chance to study the man were 
given, you would not take it on, though 
on the information you have you "take a 
chance." 

First striker : What are we on strike 
for anyway — more pay or less work ? 

Second striker : Naw. De boss didn't 
take his hat off or take his seegar outar 
his mouth when talking to the walking 
delegate. 




OblPearmi M bereyouan again. Will 

l . i .ms made out ll ii the 20th of 

the month and [hare a draft to meet to-morrow, ami 
my bull are nut all rendered yet. 

i' why don i you gel the 
the name aa your neighbor smith use,. 

■i.ee to trail for his bills. 



PHONES MAIN 130 and 135. 

Business Men 

stop and consider the number 
of hours you waste every month in making out your bills, 
and the number of dollars you lose by not having your 
bills made out. Those who use the 

Briggs Ledger System 



post every day from the sales book directly to the ITE- 
MIZED BILLS, having them ALWAYS ready to render, 
leaving a COPY of all the items in the journal sheet and 
ledger stub on the side with pages and number of the sales 
book showing original charge. 

The Briggs Ledger System is the only System 
manufactured for the retail trade in the world that 
consists of a ledger, journal, index, itemized bills, and 
merchandise account under one perpetual binding. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 




You see, Messenger! I use the H Briggs Ledger 

System, anil my hills are always made out, and you 
know I render over 350 aceounts the 30th of every month 

Yes, Sir ! But you could not have them ready and do 
as your neighbor grocerymfin Jones does, for he uses the 
old system of book-keeping, and I never ean gel his bUIfl 

lo render before the 20th of the next month. 



The BRIGGS LEDGER SYSTEM CO, Limited, 75 York St., TORONTO 



40 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Next 

Week's 

Number 



will be specially devoted to 
"Heating and Tinware." 
We will be glad to hear 
from any of our readers who 
have suggestions to offer, or 
ideas to discuss. 
Advertisers who wish extra 
space will kindly send in 
cop}- early. 

Hardware and Metal. 



THE "SUN" BRAND PORTLAND CEMENT, 

\\ <■ make only one quality and that the best. 

Ask us for quotations. 

The Sun Portland Cement Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND 
Jas. A. Clinic, Managing Director. 



Sll_VI 



LATED \A/AR 



HOLLOWWARE and FLATWARE 



Prices Right and Quality Guaranteed. 



Red, White, Blue, Pink and Green I'dass, fancy hand decorated and plain, Mounted 
into Berry and Fruit Dishes, Sugar Bowls, Cream Jngi, Butter Dishes, Spoon Bolder*, etc, 

IT WILL PAY YOU TO PLACE YOUR FALL ORDER WITH US 
FOR ALL KINDS OF SILVERWARE. 

E. W. GILMORE & BRO., 



Importers of Silverwuri-. 



ftO BAY STREET, TORONTO. 



AMERICAN, or Flat Llnh' 



NIAGARA. WIRE LINK 




Oneida 
Community 




ITanufactiired at 

Niagara Falls. Ont. 



SMOOTH AND EASY 



STRONGEST TIE MADE 



s 



h 




PATENTED 1874. 



The King of 

Centre-Adjustment 

Clippers 

still remains 

unsurpassed 

after a run of nearly 

THIRTY YEARS 




| " Clipper, 



The Improved 

I. PATTERN 

"NEWMARKET" 

may now be obtained 
from all jobbers. 

Detachable Plates. 

Improved Cap with 
Long Bearing. 

Rigidity and Easy 
Running. 

Accurately Machined 
and Perfectly Fitted. 

All Parts Interchangeable, 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



BURMAN & SONS, LIMITED 

BIRMINGHAM, E ngland. 



J. INIicklin & Oo. 

Great Charles Street, Birmingham, Eng. 



BEOISTEPpT, 



MAKERS OF- 



(SAJONIC} Curtain Rings, Tinned Blind Rings 

Brass Rimmed Tablets, 

Also the following: 

Mill Brand Fastecer. 

"Lion" Mill Band Fastener, 



Brass Sail Eyelet and Ring 





Brass Stamped Label. 

MAKERS 

"Utile" Curtain Hook. 




Agent : F. H Roger, Carlaw Building, 30 Wellii 



W., Toronto. 



47 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




I 



ounced thai work on th'e Brat 
portion of th> Nepigon Railwaj is to 
menced at once. The road is 
to be put through tliis Summer and Fall 
Station, on the C.P.R.. a 
point on Lake Superior fiftj miles west 
ot Port Arthur, to the south end of Lake 
■ n. a distance of forty miles. The 
new trans-continental line is expected to 
pass 30 or I' 1 miles north of it. 

Franklin Grobfa who lias acted for sev- 
eral years as superintendent of the Brant 
ford works of The Massey Harris Co., is 
now to be general manager. 

Supplementary letters patent have been 
i — n« il confirming a by law of the Anchor 
Knitting Co.. of Almonte. Out.. Ltd.. 
providing for an increase of the capital 
stork from 850,000 to 1150,000. 

The large mill belonging to Murray iV. 

i\ of St. John. N. I!., has I u 

totally destroyed by lire. Fortunately 
the lire department was able to save the 
lumber piles. The mill will probably be 
rebuilt. 

The Ottawa T.ast Water Co., Ltd., of 
Ottawa East, have been incorporated 
with a Capital of 840,000, to supply the 
village of East Ottawa with water. The 
directors are: James Ballantyne, Ber- 
nard Slattery, C. F. Winter and \\. A.D. 
Lees, all of Ottawa East. 

The Provincial Grocers, Ltd., of Tor- 
'Onto, Out., have been incorporated with 
a capital of 8250,000 to carry on a gener- 
al grocery business. The directors are : 
M. M. Clancy, J. L. Davidson, W. B. 
Rogers, William Scott and John Med- 
land, all of the city of Toronto. 

Work has commenced on the C.'P.B. ter- 
minal at Winnipeg. Extensive cattle 
van Is are to be added to the local 
equipment and new round houses, car, 
and locomotive shops will be erected. 
Work on the buildings will all be done by 
contract, but as yet only the contract for 
the round house has I li let. 

The F: Hamilton Co., Ltd., of Hamil 
ton. Out., have been incorporated with a 
capital of 840,000, to manufacture, Duy, 
sell and deal in all classes of hardware. 
house-fittings and furnishings and to car- 
ry on the general business of a hardware 
merchant. The directors are : Ferdin- 
and Hamilton. Sormaii Slater and John 
Adam, all of Hamilton. 

The Church Mfg. Co.. Ltd., of Fenelon 
Falls, Out., have been incorporated with 
a capital of 840,000, to manufacture, buy, 
sell and otherwise deal in furniture, wire 
screens and any other articles which may 
be manufactured either wholly or partly 
from wood. Tli.' directors arc: W. H. 
Church, I), li. Martin and George Martin. 
all of Fenelon Falls, Ont. 

It is probable that the new cement in 
dustry to be established in Kingston will 
be i ii i kIi larger than was at fust pro- 
posed. Having an unlimited supply of 
marl and good railway facilities the com 
pany want the advantage of large pro- 
duction. A proposition will likely be 
submitted to Kingston electors regarding 



grant of free site and exemption from 

taxes. 

The Stratford Wholesale Grocery Co., 
Ltd.. of Stratford, Ont.. have been incor- 
porated with a capital of 8100,000, to 

buy, sell, deal and trade in groceries. 
provisions, fruits and other articles of 
commerce. The directors are: George 
Ballantyne, A. H. Kino. J. c. Monteitb 
anil John Oorric. all of Stratford. Out. 
and I). A. Dempsev of township of Ellice, 
county of Perth. 

The Industrial Packing Co., Ltd., of 
I'almerston, (int.. ha\e been incorporated 
with a capital of 8300,000, to carry on a 
general packing-house and canning- busi- 
ness, and to generate power for the use 
of the company and dispose of any sur- 
plus thereof. The directors are : W. J. 
Falconer, John Burns, and John Oliver, 
of Palmerston. Ont. ; and Hugh Cunning- 
ham of Ethel, Ontario. 

The Robert Greig Co., Ltd., of Toronto, 
Ont.. have been incorporated with a 
capital of 865,000, to acquire the busi- 
ness of Robert Greig iS: Co., and to carry 
on a general importing and manufactur- 
ing business in cereals, spices, baking- 
powders, grocers', druggists* and confec- 
tioners' supplies, etc. The directors are : 
William Cooke, Robert Greig, Ella M. 
Greig, W. H. B. Aikins, and S. T. 

Bastedo. 

The Central Telephone Co., Ltd., of 
Belleisle Creek, N.B., have been incorpor- 
ated with a capital of §1(1. ('Oil, to carry 
on a general telephone business in all its 
branches and maintain a system of tele- 
phonic communication from St. John to 
Fredericton, via Rothesay. Perry Point, 
Kingston, Belleisle and White*s Cove. 



The directors are! Ceo. (i. (I. Scovil, 
Belleisle Creek ; E, G. Evans, Hampton ; 

.1. M Scovil, St. John ; L. P. Farris, 

White Cove ; William Pugsley, Rothesay; 

and James Domville, Rothesay, N.B. 

The Cooper Hopkins Supply Co., Ltd.. 
Montreal, have been incorporated, with 
a capital of 8100,000, to carry on the 
business of merchants, manufacturers and 
dealers in all kinds of metals and all ma 
terials and supplies relating thereto; to 
carry on a general business of inanufac 
turing and dealing in mining, contract- 
ing and railway supplies ; and to acquire 
I In- business of James Cooper, Montreal. 
The directors are: James Cooper, J. M. 
Ward, J. J. Kosevear. Garvin Milroy and 
F. H. Hopkins, all of Montreal. 

The Canada Transit Co.. Ltd.. of Ot- 
tawa, Ont.. have I n incorporated with 

a capital of 81,000,000, to carry on a 
general transportation business ; to ac- 
quire, manufacture, and use sail vessels, 
steamers and barges ; to construct and 

use basins, docks, elevators, piers, etc., 
at any point where the company's ves- 
sel may call ; and to carry on the busi- 
ness of a warehouseman, wharfinger and 
carrier of passengers and goods of every 
description. The directors are : Robert 
Bickerdike, Alphonse C. N. Blakeley, 
Rodolphe Lemieux, all of Montreal ; and 
C. B. K. Carpenter; London, England. 

The Electric Purifying Co., of Canada. 
Ltd., Montreal. Que., have been incorpor- 
ated with a capital of $20,000 to acquire 
and continue as a going concern the busi- 
ness of The Electric Purifying- Co. of Can- 
ada ; to acquire the right of J. C. V. 
Beaudry, W. B. Roberts and A. L. J. 
Desnoyers to certain new inventions in 
process and apparatus for purifying 
fluids, electrodes and filtering apparatus ; 
to heat and purify fluids by electricity, 
according to this patented process, and to 
sell purifying apparatus manufactured in 
conformity with the said patent. The 
directors are : J. C. V. Beaudry, W. 
B. Roberts, A. L. J. Desnoyers, Joseph 
Beaudry and M. C. Desnoyers. all of 
Montreal. 



APOLLO 

galvanized iron pays in propor- 
tion to work expended on it. 

Good metal is cheaper than 
labor. 

Quick service. 

Return a whole sheet for an 
inch of fault. 



American Sheet Steel Company 
Battery Park New York 



48 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. BOKER 6c CO.'S "TREE " BRAND 




Extensive variety of pattern and finish. 

Also SCISSORS, SHEARS and RAZORS. 

Retailers can readily double the cost on Boker's Cutlery. 

For sale by all Leading Wholesale Hardware Houses. 
CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



Inly 17, 1903. 

These prices ere for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures lieing for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash Imyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. 1 he 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 
Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $33 00 $34 00 

TINPLATES. 

Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

MLS, equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes 36 75 

IX " 825 

I X X " 9 75 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

I C 6 75 

IX 825 

I X X 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes 5 00 

IX " 600 

I X X " 7 00 

IXXX " 800 

DO, 124x17 4 50 

DX 5 25 

DXX 6 00 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 4 00 

I.C., special sizes, base 4 50 

20x28 9 00 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets 8 50 

IX., Terae Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " Y .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 8 

r ' 26 " 8 50 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 2 05 

Refined " " 2 45 <; 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 40 

Hoop steel, 14 to 3-in. base 2 90 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 230 250 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T. Firth&Co.'s tool steel, per lb 124 13 

Jessop's tool steel 14 

Morton's tool steel 124 13 

Black Diamond and "B.C.'' 

tool steel 10 11 

Chas. Leonard's tool steel. ... 08 09 

Park's "Silver" tool steel... 12 14 

" "Special" 15 20 

Jonas k Colver's tool steel 10 20 

" "Air Hardening" 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 C10 

BOILER TUBES. Per foot. 

Jin 09 09* 

2 in 104 11 

24 in 0113 134 

3 in 144 15 

3*in 17 174 

4 in 34 35 



STEEL BOILER PLATE. 

J in 2 50 2 60 

3-16 in 2 60 2 70 

S in. and thicker 2 50 2 60 

BLACK SHEETS. Com. D.Fl 



COPPER. 

Ingot. 



I'. , 



Casting 

Lake Superior. 



10 and 12 gauge 2 55 

18 gauge 2 85 

20 " 2 85 

22 to 24 gauge 2 95 

26 " 3 05 

28 3 15 

COPPER WIRE. 

Discount, 50 per cent. 



CANADA PLATES. 

All dull, 52 sheets 2 90 

Half polished 3 00 

All bright 3 75 



IRON PIPE. 



; pipe — 
i inch 



3 00 
2 30 



Galvanized pipe- 
} inch 



2 75 

3 00 
3 00 
3 25 
3 50 



3 00 
3 10 
385 



3 25 
2 40 
2 65 

2 85 

3 65 
5 20 

7 35 

8 95 
12 55 
21 00 
25 00 
32 00 
38 50 
45 00 
48 00 
63 00 



3 20 
3 45 
3 85 
5 00 
7 20 
10 05 
12 20 
16 85 



Malleable Fittings— Discount 15 p.c. 
Cast Iron Fittings— 

On unions, 55 per cent. ; on nipples, 60 pel 
cent.; on all others, 50 per cent. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Quel in '« 
G.C. Comet Bell. Head 



16 gauge 

18 to 24 gauge 

26 

28 



4 05 3 75 3 75 
4 25 4 00 3 90 
4 50 4 25 4 05 



4 05 
4 25 
4 50 



American brands, $4 40 for 28 gauge. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN 

oof coil, 3-16 in, per 100 lb 

J " ..7 85 8 10 

5-16 " . 5 25 5 50 

i " . 4 50 4 75 

7-16 ". . . 4 25 4 50 

4 .. 4 20 4 50 
9-16 " ..4 05 4 50 

5 .. 4 00 4 50 
J .. 4 00 4 50 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 
35 p.c. 

Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 



Out lengths, round, 1 to I in. . 

round and square, 

1 to 2 inches. . . . 



23 00 



UK) II,, 
1 , M 



•_'.', Id) 
25 00 



22 60 

23 00 

24 00 
32 00 



23 
22 
21 



28 
32 



Sheet 

Plain, 14 oz., anil light, 111 oz., 

14x48 and 14x60 22 00 

Plain, 14 oz., and light, 16 oz., 

irregular sizes 22 50 

Tinned copper sheet 

Planished 

Braziers (in sheets), 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 

35 to 45 " 
" 50-lb. and above 

BOILER AND TK PITTS 

Plain tinned, per lb 

Spun, per lb 

BRASS 
Bod and sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, l.) i«r cent 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 25 6 50 

Domestic ..., 

ZINC SHEET, 

5-owt, casks 6 25 6 J 

Part casks 6 75 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 50 

Bar, perlb 05 

Sheets, 24 lb. sq. ft , by roll 061 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Notf. Cut sheets ta. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lisi 
per lb and 30 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

SHOT. 

Common, S6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 15 p.c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, SI John and Halifax 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

. SOIL PIPE AND FITT1NUS 
Light soil pipe, discount, 45 and 5 peroextt. 
" " fittings, discount 50 and 5 p c. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 55 

and 5 percent. 
7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

SOLDEB Peril.. 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed — 20 

Bar. half-and-half, commercial 19 194 

Refined 19 

Wiping 17 184 

ANTIMONY 
Cookson's perlb. 9 00 



WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 



Pure 

No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

i 
Monro's Select Flake White. 
Elephant and 1 1 

Brandram s i oinnnc 

" Decorativ, 

" No. I.. 

" Monarch " brand 

Decorator's Pure 

Essex Genuine 



5 00 
I 83| 
4 25 
3 87J 
3 50 



5 25 
4 874 
4 50 

4 124 
3 75 

5 75 

5 25 

6 50 
600 

5 50 

6 124 
5 50 
5 25 



BED LEAD 

Genuine, 560 lb casks, perewt #4 75 $5 00 

'•■ r urn ii. kegs, 

No i. 560 ii. casks, i ■ rewl i 00 
v I, 100 lb, kegs, per owl I 25 

WHITE zim 

Extra Bed Seal 06 08 

No 1 05J 07 

do. 2 05 

DRY WHITE LEAD 

Pure, casks 5 25 

Pure, kegs 

No I, casks 5 00 

No. 1, kegs 5 25 

pbepabsd PAnrre 

In J, 4 and 1-gallun tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualil les, per gallon l iki 

Barn (in bolt i » 60 :«i 

The Sherwin-Williams paints .... 140 

Canada Paint Oo.'s pure.. l 25 

Toronto Lead A Color Oo's purs — 125 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 120 

Standard Paint Co - " N. iv 

I 1 30 

"Globe" 1 30 

bam 60 70 

The Francis Frost Co. 8 

" Ark Brand .... 1 25 
The Francis - Frost Co. I 

British Navy deck 1 50 

Hollywood paste paint 1 40 

liquid paint 1 25 

" door paint 1 26 

Hendersons. Potts's "Anchor" 

Brand 1 35 

Globe I'aint Co s mixed 1 30 

Paint Co. s barn and 

bridge 75 

COLORS IN on. 

•_'.'. II. tins, Standard Quality. 

Venetian red, per lb o 031 05 

Chrome yellow 12 14 

Golden ochre 07 10 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French I mis-rial green 14 

Signwriters' black 16 

Umber 04 06 

Sienna 04 07 

OOLOBS, i>i:y 

Common ochre. I. bis 1 15 1 30 

V.llow ochn i.l r l. - i bbll 2 00 

Brussels ochre 2 00 

Venetian red, l.l.l 1 50 2 25 

English oxides, per cwt 3 00 3 25 

rioan oxides, bbls 125 2 75 

( .ina.li:. n ..\i.l' -. l.hls 1 25 1 75 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c. 2 00 2 25 

Burnt sienna, pure, per II. 10 

" limber, " "... 08 10 

Raw umber 08 10 

Drop black, pure .. 10 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

l 'hrome greens, pure per lb . . 09 10 

Golden ochre 003 004 

I'ltranjarine blue, in 28-lb. 

boxes, perlb 06 12 

Fn proof mineral, per 100 lb 100 

GenunieEng. Litharge, per lb — 07 

Mortar color, per uni ii. 1 25 1 50 

Pure Indian red. No 45, lb.. 08 10 

Whiting (common), 1.1.1 55 60 

English rentdlion in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 

BLUESTONE. 

Casks, for spraying 5 50 

100-lb. lets do perlb 08 



49 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THOS. GOLDSWORTHY & SONS 



EMERY { 



MANCHESTER, ENGLAND. 

Cloth 
Corn 

Flour 



We carry all numbers of Corn and Flour Emery in io-pound packages, from 8 to 140, 
in stock. Emery Cloth, Nos. OO., O., F., FF., 1 to 3. 

JAMES HUTTON & CO., Wholesale Agents for Canada, MOtltreal, 



ri I 

Hulk In bbta 1 <o 

Bulk in leas quantity 195 

bbls 2 00 

Bladders in kegs. Inixes or looee 3 25 

2 25 

tins 2 50 

Bladder* in bulk or tins lea than 100 lb. 2 50 

\ M:\Mlts. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Hi I 

... So. 1 1 50 1 60 

Psle durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown Japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

' ■ 1 90 1 00 

Hani oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 1 75 2 00 

Jheliac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 230 240 

runx'ut ine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

No. 1. 85 90 

Klastilite varnish. 1 gal can, each.. 2 00 

Qranitine Boor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20; 

si/e 2. 70c; size 3, 40c each. 
Sherwin-Williams kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from J pts. to 1 gal., $2.50. 

CASTOR oil.. 

Kntish.lst qual.in cases, per lh 084 09J 

•• small lots .... 10 10j 

cod on., ETC. 

Ood oil. per gal 50 55 

Pore olive 140 

neatsfoot 90 

Gl.l'E. 

Oommon 08 09 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Mnltner 

Ground 12 16 

te, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION, 

Cartridges. 

B. B Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 pel 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 4<i p <■ , American. 

Kim Pure Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and. 5 p.c. 

md Rifle, 10 n.c., Atncr. 
Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 'SO per o-nt 

idges, Bporting and Mili- 
tary. Dominion, r> per cent 

u Fire. Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent t-, list. BOB. Caps, 
discount ttperoenl . American. 

i and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
"Dominion grades, 25 per cent Rival 
anil Nitro. in per cent, advance on list. 
Brans Shot Shells, 56 per 
Primers, Dom., 30 i*r cent.; American, $1.80. 

Wads, per lb. 

: ick white felt wadding, in J-lb. 

hags $1 00 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

i-lh hags 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

Of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each. 10 gauge 35 

Best thick white card wads, in I 

of 500 each, 8 gauge 55 

rhin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

rhin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each. 8 gauge 



Chemically prepared black edge grey 

cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

1 1 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each — 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 

ADZES. 
Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and oyer 102 

Hay Budden, 80-lh. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11 J 

AUOERs. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 

Double hit, " 10 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes. 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 

Boys Axes 6 25 

Splitting Axes 7 00 

Handled Axes 7 50 



10 00 
18 00 



6 00 

7 00 
12 00 
10 00 



AXLE CREASE. 



Ordinary, per gross 5 75 

Best quality 13 00 



6 00 

15 00 



BATH TIPS. 



Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 15 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 
Standard Enameled. 

51-inch rolled rim, 1st quality 24 00 

5j 2nd " 20 00 

1. u.l.l 1 METAL. 

" Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 0115 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo. . 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

BELLS. 

Band. 



Brass, 60j>er cent, 
per cent. 



Brass, Ml pi 

Nickel, 55 1 



Cow. 



American make, discount 63<] per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

!'• t. rboro', discount 46 per cent. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 

House. 
American, per lb 35 

BELLOWS. 



3 00 
40 



Hand, per doz 3 35 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 

Blacksmiths', discount '0 per cent 



4 75 
10 00 



BELTING, 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, till and 10 percent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 
Auger. 
Gilmour's, discount 60 and 5 per cenl. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
uilmour's, 47.;. to 50 per cent. 
Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 072 12 

bolts and nuts. Per cent. 
Carriage Bolts, common (si list) 50 and 10 
" full sq. (J2.40 list) 55 and 10 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 55 and 10 

Machine Bolts, all sizes 50, 5 and 10 

Plough Bolts 50, 5 and 10 

Blank Bolts 50, 5 and 10 

Bolt Ends 50, 5 and 10 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 65, 5 and 10 

Coaeh Screws, cone point 663 and 10 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 3'i'c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods, per lb., 5J to 6c. 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 62i per cent. 

BROILERS. 

Light, discount 65 to 67| per cent. 
Reversible, discount 65 to 675 per cent. 
Vegetable, per doz., discount 375 per cent. 

Henis, No. 8 per doz 6 00 

Henis, No. 9 " .... 7 00 

Queen City " .... 7 50 

BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS 

German per doz. 6 00 1100 

American " 12 00 20 00 

III 11 'HER KM\ I.S. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Kelt, per 100 lb 1 75 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb., ^ 

per roll 1^. 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, riot under i>5 lb., ^k 

per roll 1 15 ^r 

Carpet Fell per ton 45 00 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 4tX) SO. ft, 40 . 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 60 

0. K &I.X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized " 400 " 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 600 " 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar. . . . > per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 00 

BULL RIHG8 

Copper, $2.00 for 21-inch, and SI. 90 for 2-inch 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 



■"S^Wrought si,, 1. 

Fast Joint, disi lit 65. 10 and 25 per cent. 

Loose Pin, discount 65J in and 25 percent 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 percent, 
( len, li ronzed ..per pair' 40 65 

1 aiii'et B^^rXOB 1 IRS. 

American rrcr doz. 100 1 50 

Bollard's " .... 6 50 

castors. //^^mr 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57J per cent. f 
Plate, discount 525 to 575 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 31 and 32 per gross 8 50 9 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Bed 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
W'arnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. tl W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent 

CHURN 

Revolving Churns, metal frames- No. 0, $8 
No. 1, $8.50; No. 2, $9.00; No. 3, $10.00 
No. 4, $12.00; No. 5, $16.00 each. Ditto 
wood frames, 20c. each less than the above 
Discounts : Factories, 53 per cent, 
delivered from stock in Montreal, 51 per 
cent. Terms 4 months or 3per cent, cash in 
30 days. 

churn frames, including bearings, Levers, etc 

Nos. 0, 1, 2 and 3, wood, $2.40; and 4 and 
5, $2.65. Metal frames, 25c extra. Dis- 
count 15 per cent., net 30 days. 

CLIPS. 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 

closets. Net. 

Plain York or Ontario Syphon Jet. . . $9 60 
Enib. " " " . Hi 90 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Elgin or Tell Syphon Washout 6 00 
Emu. " " " . . 6 60 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 6 00 
Low " " 1 nib. .. 6 50 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

E.nb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Low Down Ontario Syphon .let, plain 11 70 
Low " '• " ctnbd. 12 3" 

Closet connection 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 70 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 25 

COMPASSES, DIVIIiEIIS. Ill 

American, discount li'J 1 to 65 per 1:1 nt. 
QONDUCTOB PIPE. 
Plain or Corrugated. 
2-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 6 7. 

6 " " " 9 00 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

( lanadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

S. & D., No. 3 per pair 17J 

S. &D., " 5 '' 22J 

S. &D., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR srRINGS. 

Tnrrey's Rod (15 p.c.). per doz 2 00 

Coil " 88 1 60 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNI\ Is 

Coach and Wagon, discount 50 and 10 per 

cent. 
Carpenters', discount 60 and 10 per cent. 



oO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



We Make the Goods You Want 

because your customers want the goods we make. Send us your orders for 
BUILDING PAPERS, ROOFING FELTS, WIRE EDGED READY 

ROOFING, and all parties will be satisfied. 



The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 



Toronto and Montreal, 



DRILLS. 

Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Kails, par doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Morse, discount 371 to 40 per cent. 

St amlard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FATJOETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROlHillS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 3 10 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch "• 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RAsrs. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disston's 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MoCleUan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

rent. 

Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27J per cent. 
Nicholson File Co.'s "Simplicity " file handle, 
per gross 85c. to $1.50 

OLASS. 

Window. Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inches. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

Under 26 2 3 80 .... 6 75 

26 to 40 2 10 4 00 .... 7 25 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 8 75 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 10 00 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 11 5 1 

71 to 80 5 50 .... 12 50 

81to85 14 00 

86 to 90 16 50 

91 to 95 18 00 

96 to 100 20 00 

A dis ount of 25 per cent, is offered on 
"Double Diamond." 

nAl'iiES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley's, discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 

Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

HALTERS. 

Rope, 2-inch per gross 

Rope, 1 " ,r .... 9 00 

Rope, i to J-inch .... " .... 14 00 

Leather. 1-inch per doz. 3 871 4 00 

Leather, It " " 5 15 5 20 

Web " 187 2 45 

IIIMMEKS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 271 per cent 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 110 120 

SI ge. 

anadian per lb. 071 081 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 
Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 
tore door perdoz. 100 150 



Fork. 
0. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane 

American .... per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 
Cross-Cut Saws. 

Canadian pcrpair .... 1.1; 

UANtiERS. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 5 85 6 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 5 00 

5-inch 6 50 

Lane's covered- 
No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. Hi, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 21 00 

Lane's O.N. T. track, per foot .... 041 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 421 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Hen dcrson & Potts' "Anchor Brand' 

HI NOES. 

Blind, Parker's, discount 163 percent 

lieavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 061 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 052 

10-in., " 051 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

( Jarden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter perdoz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Discount 45 and 5 per cent. 

HOOKS 

Cast Iron. 

Bird cage per doz. 50 1 10 

Clothesline " 27 63 

Harness " 72 88 

Hal and coat per gro. 100 3 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 1 00 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples, Canadian dis- 
count 471 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 45 per cent 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Strew, bright, discount 55 per cent. 

horse NAir.s. 
"C" brand. 40, 10 and 71 per cent, off list Oval 
"M brand, 50, 10 and a per cent I head 

Countersunk, 571 percent. 
"Monarch," 60 percent. 
" Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 
HORSESHOES 

I' o IS. Montreal 
No. 2 No 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

Light, medium and heavy 3 35 3 60 

Snow shoes 360 385 

Steel Shoes. 

Light 3 45 3 70 

Featherweight (all sizes) 4 85 4 &j 

FOB. Toronto, Hamilton, London and 
Guelph, 10c. per keg additional. 

Toe weight steel shoes 6 70 

japanned ware 
Discount 4C •>.nd 5 per cent, off list, June 1899 

ICE PICKS. 
Star perdoz. 00 3 25 



Brass spun, 71 per cent, dlsconnl oil ni 

Copper per lb. 30 60 

Acirioai 60 and 10 to ?i r>nd peroent 



Look, Canadian dis. in to 4o and 10 per oenl 
Cabinet trunk and padlock, 

American per gross .... 60 

KNOBS. 
Door, japanned and NT, pel 

doz 1 50 t 60 

Bron/c, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, K. k I/. 

screw per gross 1 30 4 00 

White door knobs. .. .per dot loo 



Net prices. 



II \\ KNIVES. 



I. \ >l I' « l< Ks 



Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS 

Cold Blast perdoz. 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... 

Dashboard, cold blast. . 

No. " 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SIJI EEZEItS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 

Galvanized 1 87 

King, wood 

King, glass 

All glass 

LINES. 

Fish per gross 

Chalk 



4 00 
50 



1 05 
1 90 



7 on 

8 .50 

4 on 

9 00 

5 75 



5 U 

3 85 
2 90 

4 60 

90 



2 60 

7 40 



• LAWS MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 12-in. wheel 7 50 

Star " 5 60 

Daisy " 4 90 

Philadelphia, 12-in. wheel 6 50 

Ontario, " 14 25 

Discount, 50 per cent 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10', -in high wheel 7 50 10 00 

!i in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 49 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent 

LOCKS 
Canadian, 40 to 40 and 10 per cent 

Russell & Erwin per doz. 3 00 3 25 m 

Cabinet. 

Eagle, discount 30 per cent 

Padlocks, 

English and Am perdoz 50 6 

Eagle, discount 20 to '_'"i per cent 
MACHINE SCREWS 
Iron and Brass. 
Flat head. diSCOUnl 25 per , cut. 

Round head, discount 2o per cent 

KAXLKTS 

Tinsmiths perdoz. 135 1 .VI 

Carpenters', hickory, 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

M vi n» k. 

Canadian perdoz. 5 50 6 50 

\\y.\i c I lll.l:- 
Anicrican, discount 33i percent, 
German, 15 tier cent. 

Gem each — 115 

MILK c.N TBnilUHGS 
Discount 25 per cent 

NAILS. Cut. Wire 

2d and 3d 3 45 3 45 

3d 3 10 3 12 

4 and 5d 2 85 2 95 

6and7d 2 75 2 80 

8and9d 2 60 2 60 

10 and 12d 255 255 

16and20d 250 250 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 4c 2 45 

Cut nails in earlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in earlots are S2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 75 per cent 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per 



\ mi. PULL] 

German ami American .1 IB 3 50 

N Ml 

Square, round and octagon, 

3 38 4 00 

Diamond 1 00 ZOO 

poi ltbi imrora 
2 in nfesh, 19 ■ g dis tt p- I ■ < oj 
2 in Mesh, 16 » g and heavier, *\ p c 

OAK I M 

Navy per 100 II. 

Plumbers " 

Oil I 

Met'larj I Model galvanized 
oil i an. w/'i Dump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

/.me and tin, .lis. ount 60, 60 and HI p. i cent 

i opper perdoz. 1 

P.rass " 1 .V) 3 50 

Malleable, discount 26 per cent 

., M.\ \NI/| n P MLS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount I5pei 
Flaring pattern, discount 15 percent 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per < 

PI El 'ED H IKE 

Discount 40 per cent oil list. .Inn. 

10-qt Hairing sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 

8, Hi and 14 qt flaring pail-, -li- io per cent, 

( 'reamer cans, discount 40 DOT cent 
IP K- 

Per dozen 6 00 

PICTURE Mil.- 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 1 00 

III It UK WIRE. 
Tin and gilt. diSCOUnl 75 per cent. 
PINK TAR. 

', pint ill tins per gross ... 7 iVl 

1 " " " .... 9 60 

PLA N I - 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 10 |>cr i cut , 

American discount .VI jmt cent 
\\ 1, fancy Canadian or American. 

41) per cent 

PLANE DlOn 

li perdoz. '.' 00 5 00 

PI.IEHS AND Nlll I I - 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, dl 

. (II pel cent. 

Button s imitation perdoz. 5 00 coo 

ui " 60 2 60 

PLUMBZBS HI i- DOOM 

Standard ( 'oinprcssion work. dis. I, i |mt cent. 
".l.M.TV Cushion work, discount 50 pi 
Fuller work, discount 

I, dozen lots and over of the above. extra dis- 
count 10 per i cut. 
Lever handle stops and Waste, discount 60 

per cent. With, in lots Ol i dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per cent 

".I M T GloU. Angle and ( I 

discount 55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check I 

discount 65 per cent. 
" J.M.T." Radiator Valves, discount 55 per 

cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 65 |xr 

cent 

Patent Quick-Opening v iunt 70 

per cent 

No. 1 compression bath co k net 2 00 

No I " " 2 00 

No. 7 Fullers " 2 20 

No. 41. " 2 35 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

, hot and cold perdoz, 15 00 

Patent Compression ( ushion, bath 

rock. \ ■ '.. - 2 25 

Square bead bras- it 80 percent 

iron ' 60 

Competitioi i Valve 

discount 70 per cent 
hompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 



51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



I Roofing Pitch 



"Gauntlet 
Brand." 



1 1ST TO HAND A LARGE CONSIGNMENT OF THIS 
CELEBRATED PITCH; FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT. 

Lockerby & McComb, 65 Shannon St., Montreal 



Bell Telephone Main 1989. 



^^^^^mm^m^m^^^r^^^^m 



PBl 881 D sPIKEs 

D • -.11 jht cent 

PI I ' ■ 

Hothouse per dot 55 100 

22 33 

" n-27 1<B 

" 35 2 50 

1-1 Ml--. 

Canadian cistern '80 360 

inn J.it.ln r gpoUt 1 40 2 10 

ITS' 

Saddlers per doz. 100 IK 

Conductor's " 9 00 15 00 

I'lnners. solid perset — 72 

hollow per inch — 100 

R \sc.K BOILERS. 

-lion, 30 gallon net BOO 

35 " " 7 00 

40 " " 8 00 

Ronald s Galvanized, 30 gallon, " 7 40 

35 " 8 40 

40 " 9 60 
22 00 
24 00 

" 28 00 

i off popper boilers 15 per cent. 
ELAKEB 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up. 



Copper, 30 gallon. 
" 35 •• 



B w.ons. 



per doz 
4 00 18 00 



4 00 
7 50 

12 50 
3 GO 
7 00 
6 00 

10 00 



8 50 



18 00 

11 00 
I., OQ 

10 00 

12 mi 

12 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 50 



Klli«.t s 

I [tier's \Co. s 

linkers .' 

King Cutter 

Wade & Butcher's 

Theile .v < ,>u(iik s 

Baile) ■ •'•• 

Bailey's Brantford 

Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite — 

Griffon No 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon stropping M achines. . 
Lewis Bros " Klean Kutter 
KM.lsTERS. 
Discount 40 jkt cent. 

RIVETs AM) BURKS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

Hi per cent 
Iron Burrs, discount 56 per cent 

on lr"n Rivets iii lib. cartons, 4c. 

per III. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 4.) 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 

• Burn, only, discount 30 and 10 per i cut. 
Kxtraa on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, i-lb. 

cartons, lc per "'■ 

KIVKT M.l» 

"anadian, discount 35 to 371 per cent. 
ROPE, ETC'. 

° Jit 

Pure Manilla 14$ 

"British Manilla 12 

3-16 inch and larger 16 

" 5-92 inch 21 

i inch 22 

Rusk!.. I 15 

008 

IM b Yarn, single 11 

double 111 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz 

■ 90 feel " 80 

•' 72 feet " 95 

RILES. 

Boxwood, discount 56 per cent. 
Ivory, diaoounl 37k to to per cent 

■AD " 
Mrs Potts. No. 55, polished, per lei 

N .. oicUe-plated, " 80 

, ( M, (Mi EM PRY PAPER. 

B k A sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Emery, discount 40 per cent. 
.'Jarnet (Rurtons) 5 to 10 percent, advance 
on list 



- vp 8P01 IB. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 9 50 

SAWS. 
Hand, Disstons, discount 12i percent. 
S. \ I)., discount 40 per cent. 
I i ut. Disstons. . ..per foot 35 55 

s & 1) . discounl S5 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Back, completes each 75 2 75 

" frame only 75 

SASH WEIGHTS. 
Beotional per 100 lb. 2 50 2 75 

Solid " 1 75 2 00 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 25 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Band Sets, No 1 Woodyatt (Morrill) 4 25 
X Cut Sets, No. 3 Woodyatt (Morrill) 9 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 iier cent. 
Burrow. Stewart & Milne — 

Imperial Standard, discounl 40 per cenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
Dominion, discount 55 per cent 
" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 per cent 
" " Champion, discount 50 per c-eni. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 
screw DRIVERS. 

Sargent's per doz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 80 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

green stained, 4-in. style... .per doz. 7 00 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 15 

3-in. style 20c per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 871 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 821 percent. 
F. H., brass, dis. 80 percent. 

" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 

' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 

' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 871 per cent. 
Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 
Per doz. net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 21 per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 67] 

per eent. 
Seymour s, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SFT'IVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16x24 85 

18x30 1 00 

18x36 1 40 

SNAPS. 
Harness. Herman, discount 25 pi I 

Andrews' 4 50 1150 

SOLDERING irons. 

1, H-lb per lb 37 

21b or over " 34 

SytAKES. 

Iron, No. 493 per doz. 2 40 2 55 

" No 194 " 3 25 3 40 

ste.l, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per eent 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 521 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12$ per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Retinned. discount 75 per cent, off revised list. 



staples. 
Galvanized 3 25 3 50 

Plain 2 90 3 15 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 pel' cent. 

STOCKS and HIES. 
American discount 25 per cent 
STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindustan " 06 07 

slip " 09 09 

Labrador " 13 

Axe " 15 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind. 2-in.,40 to 200 lb.,per ton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in casc.net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase.. " .... 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS. ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 15 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12i and 12'. 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 121 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKS 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 521 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

solid heads, in hulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 'BS 

" steel each 80 8 00 

tinners' snips. 
Bailey's, discount 25 per cent. 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Came, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N, P. S. & W, 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 721, 75 per cent 

TROWELS. 

Disstons, discount 10 per cent. 

German per doz. 4 75 6 00 

S. .v D., discount 35 per ceni 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply 19 

4-ply 23 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

\ i>r> 

Wrights 13* 

Brook's 123 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

« " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 450 900 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 
discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 
10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 
50, 10 and 10 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c. 

12 " 20a " 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c. 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c. 

Acid 60c. for coppering and ¥2 for tinning 
Extra net per 100 lb.— Oiled wire 10c., 

spring wire si, 25, special hay baling wire 30c., 
best Bteel wire 75c, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) Si. 25, packed in casks 
or cases 15 , bagging and papering 10c., 50 
and 100-Mi. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c , in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in lib 
hanks, 50c., in }-lb. hanks 75c., in }-lb. 
hanks |1, 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
85- No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, si; No 20, si; 65 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, $7.30 - No. 23, $7,65 - No, 
24, |8 No 25. 39 No. 26. 19.50 No 27. 
sin No. 28, Sll-No. 29, $12 No. 30, $13- 
No.31. $14 No. 32, $15-No. 33, $16 No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos 17-25, 
12— Nos: 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $0. Coppered, 
5c. oiling, 10c— in 25-lb. bundles, 15c, - in 5 
and 10-lb, bundles, 25c- in 1-lb, hanks, 25c 
— in 1-lb. hanks, 38c— in J-lb. hanks. 50c — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 62^ per cent. Off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 621 per cent, net cash 

30 clays, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.- Nos. 4 and 5, 
S3 70 to (3.90 Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3.35 
No. 9, $2.50 - No. 10, $3.20 to $3.40 
—No. 11, $3.25 to $3.45 - No. 12, $2.6 C 
—No. 13, $2.75-No. 14. $3.75 to s3.95-No 
15, $4.30— No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2,271 f-o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
12ic. less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. $2.90; No. 19, $2,611. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No. 
19, $2.35; No. 20, $2.30, f.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING. 

Galvanized barb 2 80 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 90 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 551 in 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 75 

No. 11 3 40 

No. 12 2 95 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per lOOsq. ft., net. . 1 50 
Terms, 3 per cent, off 30 days 
waste COTTON. 

Colored per lb. 

White " 08 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, discount 35 to 371 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 percent. 

Cue's Gen nine, discount 2ii to 25 percent 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 6 00 

G. fe K.'s Pipe " .... 3 40 

Burn Us Pipe each 3 00 

Pocket per doz. 25 2 90 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian .«.. 24 00 

Royal American 24 00 

Sampson " 24 00 

Lightning " .... 27 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 days. 

WROUGHT IRON HASHERS. 

Canadian make, discount40 per cent. 



■ )-l 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



James Cartland & Son 

Manufacturers of every description of Limited 

CABINET BUILDERS' FURNISHING AND NAVAL BRASSFOUNDRY 
BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND. 



rli 


9 <i w5i 


-s*\ pv _ ^ *•<■ fry J 


H^ft?) T\ 




«AH2g *f 








111 


" S44 l l/f5558,il^ssi, II. 


rVUo*>[]' 

m | : 


|J 1 kgSSW 


J30ILJ Igls KJI • -"- --' 'wi. 



London Showrooms : 57 Holborn Viaduct, E.C. 



cBELTING 



"Your ' Para ' Rubber Belting has proved 

in every way quite satisfactory." 



Canada Papi r Co., 

M.mi i cal 



Canadian RuBBERCe 

MONTREAL -|> TORONTO 
W/N/V/PEG 



Lightning;, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






ARE 



Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 

Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing, 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., 



Philadelphia, Pa., 

U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ask 

and 

Receive. 

Advertise 

and 
Acquire. 




iiiim >i\nh 



You can reach most of the hardware 
merchants in Canada at the expense of 
a few cents. Our rate is '2c. per word 
each insertion, and remittance must 
accompany order in every case. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 




If you want to sell 
a business or a de- 
li very wagon, if you 

want a partner or a 

clerk— advertise. 

If you have what 
you don't want, or 
haven't what youdo 

want -advertise. 

Our condensed 
a<l v e r t i semenl s 
cost little, but are 
worth a t;oo<l deal. 



{ 




Four Registered Trade Marks. 

W e otter to the ambitious 
enterprising Canadian the 
world's experience in the 
manufacture of Sheep Shears. 






WIL 

KIJV 
SON 





We supply ~x of the shears used in Australia, the 
Western States and other sheep-raising countries. 
Our Shears are all made on a parallel with the 
BBA with a newly patented improvement, which 
does away with the necessity of perpetual grind- 
ing as the blade can be worn fully y% of an inch 
without losing its razor edge. Every pair fully 
warranted. BURGON & BALL, Limited, pro- 
prietors of BURGON & WILKINSON, Limited, 
Late WM. WILKINSON & ,„*,.„ mark 
SONS. Electros, circulars and vftCo 
all information from 4?-. ^./^ 

WILij 



TUADE MARK. 




DECATUR, BULL £* CO., 



Sole Canadian Agents, 



Montreal. 



KIN: 

SON: 






Largest stock and lowest 
prices in Canada. 

Drop us a postal request lor our 

Special Midsummer 

Job List of 

Bicycle Material 

AND 

Sporting Goods. 



The New Century Bali-Bearing 
Washing Machine. 



k<H0lSEH<> LD 




JOHN MILLEN& SONS 

MONTREAL & TORONTO 



Not the cheapest hut decidedly the best Washing 
Machine made. 

Five to seven minutes only required for a tubful. 

The operator need not stand when using it, and there is practically 

no wear on garments. 

Full information given on application. 

THE DOWSWELL MANUFACTURING CO., 



Hamilton, Ont. 

W. L. HALDIMAND & SON, Montreal, 



Limited. 
Eastern Agents. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MR. PRINTER, 

print the name " GEM" 
in great big letters. This 
is the best selling and 
most satisfactory meat 
and food chopper we've 
ever handled and \vc want 
you to give it lots of 
prominence. 



More Meat Choppers are sold in Pall than anv other season 
More (JEM Choppers are sold than any other Chopp 



GEM 



Meat and Food 

CHOPPER 



THE SIMPLEST 

THE MOST PRACTICAL 

SELLS AT SIGHT 
STAYS SOLD 




Stuffing attachment for Gem Choppers. 
No. 22 and 24, Sold Extra. 




. x) 



The most Satisfactory 
Fewest Parts. Easily Cleaned 

It is Heavily Tinned 

Has Self-Sharpening Cutters 



No 20 22 24 

Diara. of hopper, inches.. 3^ 4 4ft 

' barrel " 2% a'A 

Weight lbs 4 « S 7% 

lour steel tutiurs of different size 

boles accompany each machine. 
One in a box. 





%# FRU ' T a " d LARD PRESSES ' and JUICE EXTRACT0RS 

m tui 



Ul 2B 1903 

■A fo 

'33 




46 jgi 




SENSIBLE. 

No. 1. two quart. No. '1, four quart. 

Has split nut cross beam, allowing instant 
removal of pressure plate without turning 
the screw. 



ENTERPRISE. 

No 25, four quart, Japanned. 
No !•"). eight " 

No. 10. Hnned 

Including all parts shown. 



ENTERPRISE. 

No •■! capai ity one quart. 

Extracts the juice and ejects the skins and 

seeds in one operation. 



PLACE YOUR ORDERS NOW FOR THE ABOVE GOODS. 



LEWIS BROS. & Co. 

DEALERS IN HARDWARE. MAKERS OF LOW PRICES. 

Address all Correspondence to 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 



MONTREAL 



TORONTO. 87 YORK ST. 
OTTAWA, 54 QUEEN ST. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CORDAGE 



ALL KINDS AND FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



Manila Rope 

Sisal Rope 

Jute Rope 

Russian Rope 

Marline 

Housellne 

Hambrollne 

Clotheslines 

Tarred Hemp Rope 

White Hemp Rope 

Bolt Rope 

Hide Rope 

Halyards 

Deep Seallne 

Ratline 

Plow Lines 



Lathyarn 
Shingleyarn 
Bale Rope 
Lariat Rope 
Hemp Packing 
Italian Packing 
Jute Packing 
Drilling Cables 
Spunyarn 
Pulp Cord 
Lobster ATarlln 
Paper Cord 
Cheese Cord 
Hay Rope 
Fish Cord 
Sand Lines 



'RED THREAD" Transmission Rope from the finest quality Manila 
hemp obtainable, laid in tallow. 



CONSUMERS CORDAGE COMPANY. 



.Limited 



Western Ontario Representative— 

WM. B. STEWART, 
Tel. 94 27 Front St., West, Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 



i Dt. CO., lit 

CORDAGE 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

MANILA ROPE, 

SISAL ROPE, 

LATHYARN 



BINDER TWINE: 



SISAL, 



STANDARD, 

MANILA. 



All qualities and lengths, 500 ft., 550 ft., 600 ft., 650 ft. to the pound. 



We guarantee our goods to be absolutely Pure and free from all sub- 
stances calculated to inorease weight. Consumers will find on careful 
test that our goods are the Most Economical Highest quality, Low prices. 

Wire, Write or 'Phone 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 

Long Distance 'Phone 162 LIMITED 

PETERBOROUGH, ONTARIO, CANADA 



THE 




1 

STEAMER 
CLOTH 




ESTABLISHED 1750 



v / TELEGRAPHIC APDRESS \ 

m V ROPERIE ' 



LEITH 



Cordage 




EVERY 

DESCRI 



pTlON 

' OF 



& Canvas 




MANILA ROPE < 

SISAL ROPE 
NEW ZEALAND ROPE | 

RUSSIAN ROPE 

JUTE ROPE 

FISHING LINES 

NETTING TWINES 

PARCEL TWINES 

SPUNYARNSA PACKINCS 

BAILING ROPES & CORDS 

BUYERS OWN SAMPLES MATCHED AT LOWEST TRADE TERMS 



1750 



SAILCLOTH 

STEAMER CLOTHS 

AWNINCS 

TENT CLOTHS 

DUCK S 

PRESSING CLOTHS 

TARPAULINCS 

CHEMICAL WATERPROOF 

SEAMING TWINES 

ROPINC TWINES 



I EDlNBURCHl 
WATERPROOF] 



4? AND *J 

WSAIL CLOTH %l 
i£COMPANY£ 
% LEITH $ 



ADDRESS ALL COMMUNICATIONS TO OUR CANADIAN OFFICE AND STORES, 

THE EDINBURGH ROPERIE & SAILCLOTH COY, Limited, 9 St. Peter Street, MONTREAL 

4 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



;;:;:: r;s TBE QEO.B. MEADOWS 

Toronto Wire, Iron and Brass Works Company, Limited. 
Manufacturers of Wire Window Guards, Wire Cloth, 
Moulders' Riddles, Children's Cots, Bank and Office 
Railings, Ornamental Iron lentlng, Window || x - 
tures, Wire Work, Architectural Wrought Iron 
Work 

117 King St. West, TORONTO, ONT 




WOVEN WIRE 
FENCING 

That is Why 

THE BEST SELLER. 

If not represented there, write for catalogue an 
prices. 

Coiled Spring Wire. 



Made from No. 9 hard 
steel wire throughout. 

Made to sell, to last, 
and to give satisfaction. 
That is why the IDEAL is 



I'nexcelled in quality. 
THE 



Prompt shipment. 



McGregor-Banwell Fence Co,, 



WINDSOR. ONT. 



Limited. 



:<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<< <<<<<<<<H 

HARTIYIAN 

Steel Rod 
Picket Fences 







v stand u j) erectly, preserve their alignment, arc nest attractive in 

5 appearance and permanently serviceable. Specially adapted to 

v Parks, Cemeteries, Schools, Churches, Lawns and Public and Private * 

* Enclosures. Three sizes, five styles and seven heights of picket with 01 ^ 

v namental posts and gates meet all requirements. Free catalogue and price * 

: CUYAHOGA WIRE & FENCE CO., cuyahooTf^., «,.«. : 




Canadian Raprasantatlva : ALEXANDER OIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL. 



73 YEARS 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



73 YEARS 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



The Saw That Sells Itself. 

When placed in the hands of the intelligent mechanic the ATKINS High Grade Silver 
Steel Hand Saw sells itself. You simply show it and the saw does the rest. 



ATKINS Silver Steel Hand Saws with Perfection Handles are warranted 
the FINEST Saws on earth in material, temper, grinding and finish. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

H. P. HUBBARD, Sales Agent for Canada. 

Toronto Office: 30 Front St. East. Tel. Main 1896 




ALWAYS 



ATKINS 
AHEAD 



Leading San and Tool Manufa. turers 

Factories : IHDIA\APOLIS,IND. 
northwestern Branch: Minneapolis, Mlno. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






Thimble 



STOVE and 
FURNACE 



One Piece Stove Pipe 
Elbows 3 Sizes. 
The Strongest Made. 



Supplies 



are unexcelled in quality and 
workmanship. 

STOVE BOARDS 

Onyx or Embossed Patterns. 




Furnace Elbows 

in 

Tin, Galvanized 

and 

Black Sheet Steel, 

Coal Hods. 




Thimble with Pipe Inserted. 

Kemp's Patent Chimney 
Collar and Stove Pipe Holder. 

No wiring required. 

No pushing stove pipe too far in flue. 

No (laiitft'i of tin- from soul around stove pipe. 

A perfect draft through stove is acquired by this 
airtight thimble, 



Stove Shovels, 

Coal Sieves, 

Flue Stoppers 

Stove Pipe Collars, 

Stove Pipe Dampers, 

Stove Pipe Thimbles. 



KEMP'S STANDARD STOVE PIPE (Nestable). 

h Easily put together, requiring nihthdr Rivets nor Tools. 

Uniform in size, securing a porfecyfit. 

AT ^ 






We carry in stock a full line of Metals, comprising Canada Plate, Galvanized Iron and Black Sheets, also Tinplate, etc., 

which we are at all times prepared to supply at lowest market prices. 

Kem|> Manufacturing Co., 



TORONTO 



■CANADA 




VOL. XV. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JULY 25, 1903. 



NO. 30. 



Subjects Being Discussed at Ottawa 

Written for Hardware and Hetal by a Member of Parliament 



I Ion le ol ( 'ominous, 

Ottawa, July 20, L903. 

IN an earlier issue we noted an en- 
deavor on the part of the member 
for North Norfolk (Mr. John 
Charlton) t<> improve the existing 
election laws. Mr. Charlton is ever to 
be found on the side of morality, and 
whether he be engaged in "raising the 
age of consent." in what is known as 
"The Charlton Act," or one of its 
amendments, in assisting anti-cigarette 
legislation, in hastening the death of 
"The Commons Bar," now For some years 
defunct, or even as to-day, in an attempt 
to purify election contests, one thine' is 
certain, the object of improvement is ever 
in his mind, lie is. perhaps, better en- 
titled to the old party name of "Reform 
er" than is any other man on the Liberal 
Bide of the House today, and one would 

never imagine in listening to his full 
voice, as he exercises it in the use of 
strong ami telling Anglo-Saxon language 

that he has passed the age of three score 

years and ten. Iiy four. 

* • • 

To many of the purists throughout the 
length and breadth of the land, to whose 
immaculateness politics is "too dirty a 
game" in which to take a hand, the 
average public man appears as one who 
is not only willing, but even anxious, to 
evade the election law. and to promote 
the return of himself or his party by the 1 
means of bribery ami corruption. Now 

if these gentlemen who stand afar oil'. 
with the pharasaical expression "I am 
holier than thou" -tamped upon their 
faces, would only mingle in the fray, ax 
ravine themselves on the side of purity 
in the actual contest going on. an im- 
mense advantage to all would accrue, 
The average member of Parliament, for 
example, detests bribery as truly and as 
thoroughly as does the man who takes 



no part in politics whatever. lie knows 
it to be the one thine which can. and 
often does, cost him the loss of his seat 
in spite of work well done, and public 

service of marked merit. There is no 
use closing our eyes to the fact thai un- 
der manhood suffrage (for which so much 

was claimed and by which so little ha- 

been realized) there is in eighty per cenl 
of the constituencies, a purchasable vote 
of sufficient magnitude to turn the tide 
of the war. Parties in Canada are 

pretty evenly divided after all, in the 
various ridings, ami the capture of one 
hundred corrupt votes, in a total of five 
thousand cast, is very likely t<> give the 

seat to the successful manipulator. Manx 
things enter into a political contest which 
make it well nigh impossible for a candi 
date, however honest he may be in in- 
tention, to come through it absolutely 
without breach of the law, as to bribery, 

corruption, or undue influence. 
* » * 

\ contest in a constituency is a great 
number of small skirmishes all over the 
field of battle. The riding is divided in- 
to a number of polling divisions, in each 
of which some few men stand out as rival 
leaders. Frequently then there is a trial 

of strength between these local eiatlts. 

Hill Jones, who prides himself that he 
has never cast anything but a Grit vote 
in his life, has had a row over a line 
fcin.' with dim Smith who thanks Heaven 
that he and his father and grandfather 
befon him have I n true to the good 

old Tory cause. Personal animosity i - 
added to political enthusiasm ; the ward 
is about evenly divided between the par 

ties. Tt is reported to Bill dories by 

some cunning politician that dim .Smith 
has said that he intends at this election 
to show him just how little ice he cuts in 
old division '■). and. at the same time. 
some equally zealous party man on the 



other Bide, desiring to heighten the zeal 

of dim Smith, tells him that I 

that whatever influence he ever did have 

is reduced to the polling of his own and 

his hired man's vote. Then tin- truggle, 
heightened by the family pride <>f the 

Women, begins, and d in and Bill I 
all about the election law in a wild en 

deavor to demonstrate to tl Kpci 

neighborhood how little the other Feilow 

amounts to, and how big lie 1 hi. si If 
looms in the public eye 

Take another case. A man his made 
up his mind that a public office is the 
thing for him. He knows that to pro- 
cure the necessary -auction of hi- party 
he must show good work done- in his 
particular locality. By "g'ood" worl- is 
meant a big vote, not "good" in the 

sense of election morality, by anj an-. 

and once more sinster influences an 
at work to produce' the 1 desired result. 
Thus it happens that a candidate who 
has been elected, as he thinks, in a fair 
lv pure election, learns to his horror that 
an election petition has been filed against 
his return, and that he had better throw 
up the- sponge after all his hard work, as 

the case will surely go against him anj 
way, and disastrously large costs will be 
added if he limits it through. 

On the other hand, let us suppose that 
the candidate. not too squeamish him 
self, has the abiding fear, constantly fan- 
ned by his OVer-anxioUS friends that his 
opponent is out with the stuff, as it is 
elegantly expressed, He heaves a big 
sigh, thinks of the depletion of his 
meagre treasury, and ends by sa; 
"Well boys, I'm out to win. anil if the 
other chap is after the loose ti>h. 
ahead and see that we get il ; 
No, it will not stand analysis, the man 
who has the most to gain by the 
lute and complete banishment of bribery 
i- the candidate himself, and if anyone 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



would invent a process bj which it could 
indeed be don ith, he would have 

which members, irrespec- 
tive of party, would throw up both 

hands 

• • • 

h ius ti> note that in some 

rs are quite honest in the 

selling of their franchise, regarding it as 

lit. I of which they 1 1 ii -v i ■ every right 

to dispose, but which once — * > 1» 1 must be 

delivered a~ mh.Iv as a l>ae' of Bour or a 

>f . hickens. A member of the 

i> ll- :i ston of a man who 

called at his house after an election ion 

test and throwing a ten dollar l>ill on 

his desk aid. " That is yours, sir.'" The 

member did not even know him. and re 

marked that he thought that there must 

be some mistake, as In- did not Know of 

any .debt between them. The stranger 

replied, "One of your friends gave ine 

thai to vote for you, but on election day 

I was sick and could not net out. SO I 

have no right at all to it." It is 
strange ind I how little stringent elec- 
tion laws have done t.) check the evil. 
The fact s,.,'ins to lie that the average 
man does not look upon the taking or 
divine <>t money at election time as a 
sin. lint merely as a risk, which party 
loyalty, devotion to a friend, or even one 
of the ulterior objects above mentioned, 
in large measure justifies or even glori- 
fies. Men who are most estimable citi- 
zens, regular church members, and 
strictly honest business operators will, 
under the excitement of an election con- 
tent, do things which, if proved in court, 
woul. I mean imprisonment and disgrace 
which it would take years to live down, 
and which could never lie utterly effaced. 
» * • 

And bo we say, "Good luck. John Charl- 
ton anil the eight who are laboring with 
you on the purity committee, as it has 
been nick named in this land of nick- 
names. May you and your friends dis- 
cover paragraphs, clauses, and sub-sec 
tions that will not only threaten dire and 
dreadful things, hut which will, in the 
working out thereof. In- such a real ter- 
ror to evildoers that this disgrace will 
lie wiped oil the face of ofir land." Yes 

indeed, we wish you well, but with past 
experience of similar effort, and with 
knowledge of present conditions, we wish 
rather than hope. 

» » * 

By tin time this appears in print the 
dailies will have succeeded ill pretty well 
exhausting the interest aroused by the 
resignation of the Hon. A. (',. Blair, and 
it i- no part of our purpose to give a 
■ynopsis of his reasons for going out, or 
• >i the reason* of the Prime Minister for 
allowing him to do bo. On tin- other 
hand, it I ible to write of the 

of the week without reference t < , 



this, the most dramatic occurrence. not 
of the seven days, but probably since the 
Liberals have come back to power. 

In the case ,,l" Mr. Tarte. the retirement 
took place long before the session began, 
and when the time arrived for minister 
ial explanation the whole thine bad. to 

a large extent, been discounted, and only 
a rather languid interest was aroused. 
\i.| s ( , with Mr. Blair, he had just com 

pleted the passage of his Railway Com- 
mittee Hill, a stupendous piece of work. 
an<l from his labors, he had undoubtedly 
emerged with a great reputation still 

further enhanced. bet unfriendly com 
meiit now or later take what form it will, 
the fact remains that Andrew 0. Blair is 
not only great in his province of New 
Brunswick, but great in all Canada, one 
of the foremost men in Canadian public 

life to-day. 



# * # 



The issue between him and his late 
colleagues is clear-cut, it lies in the Gov- 
ernment policy with regard to the build- 
ing of the transcontinental railroad. On 
one point all are agreed ; another trunk 
line is necessary. But with the manner 
of the building, and the conditions in 
general surrounding it, the difference be- 
gins. Mr. Blair states that so great is 
his conviction as to the unsoundness of 
the Government proposals, that he could 
not honorably swallow his own opinions 
in deference to those of his colleagues. 
If a man has even a strong suspicion 
that a certain line of policy is inad- 
visable, he may, in good conscience, bow 
to the opinion of a number of strong 
colleagues in whose judgment he has 
confidence, but when that suspicion be- 
comes conviction there is but one thing 
for an honorable man to do, and that is 
what Mr. Blair has done, to resign. With 
the question of who is right, and who is 
wrong. we shall not attempt to deal. 
That will be under discussion for months 
to come in every paper great and small 
in Canada, and it will no doubt be the 
paramount issue. too. in the general 
election, be that interesting event far or 
near. But even his opponents must ad- 
mit that Mr. Blair is not only justified, 
but even to be praised for having done 
what other great men before him — the 
Hon. William Gladstone among others — 
have done, resigned for the sake of his 
convictions. 

Never in years have the galleries been 
so crowded as when the Premier arose to 
make his explanation of the rupture be- 
tween himself and his late colleague. 
Peculiar sympathy was felt for Sir Wil- 
frid because of his state of health. While 
infinitely better than at the beginning of 
the session he is still not robust, and it 
was felt that an incident so painful as 
this must necessarily be. could not but 



tell upon him. Mr. Blair himself referred 
to this aspect of -the case in a way at 
one- courteous and sympathetic. The 

Premier, however, seemed less affected 
than did his ex minister, and carried olT 
the strain of the occasion in a way which 
delighted his loyal supporters 

Throughout the proceedings were mark 
ed by a dignity that did credit to a 
House of Commons that, young as it is. 
is not without great traditions, ami. as 
the members, after the sitting, broke up 
into little animated groups, discussing 
the events of the afternoon, the opinion 
was unanimous that, however painful the 
incident, the pain was minimized by the 
excellent way in which the main partici 
pants, Sir Wilfrid, Mr. Blair, and Mr. 
Borden, had borne themselves. 

One little incident did somewhat mar 
the general effect. The way in which (he 
irrepressible Mr. Tarte. and that adjective 
We fancy, will qualify him to the day of 
his death, injected his personal grievances 
into the debate. He took occasion to 
present himself with a few fine bouquets, 
to disclose some Cabinet secrets, and to 
take a shy at several of his late col 
leagues, quoting from The Toronto News 
an article far from complimentary to Mr. 
Blair and himself, responsibility for which 
he tried in a fishing expedition to fix on 
some one or more of the members of the 
Cabinet, but without success. 



A BUSY ROOFING FIRM 

W. T. Stewart iV Co., Toronto, roofers, 
report an unusually heavy year's work, 
and this in the face of numerous strikes. 
They have been compelled to turn away 
a good many contracts from inability to 
assume them. Some of their work this 
season has been on roofs they did 20 
years ago, a tribute both to the quality 
of work done and to the contractors. 
Stewart & Co. for years past have done 
considerable work for the C.P.R. Many 
buildings and factories of national repu- 
tation have had their roofs put on by 
Stewart .V Co. "Hardware and Metal" 
finds pleasure in mentioning the successes 
of any- firm doing worthy work. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipmeat* 



The ONTARIO TACK CO. 

Limited 
HAMILTON. ONT. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FOREST CITY GOSSIP. 
Office of Hardware and Mm u.. 
:}<;."> Richmond St., London, Out. 
Ju!> 21, I'm 1:5. 

THE looked-for quietness in the hard- 
ware trade has arrived ; both the 
retail and jobbing men are likeK to 
find hut light order-, and tew sales till Sep- 
tember. After that a revival sets in, and 
builders are calling for such supplies as 

are needed to complete houses thai have 
been in course of erection during the sum- 
mer months. 

* * * 

Ten of the Old Country machinists, who, 
it is understood, were brought here to 
break the strike at E. Leonard it Sons, 
left tlie city last night. Four went to 
Winnipeg, two to Belleville, and four to 

Toronto. 

* * * 

R. S. Hannah, who lias retired from 
the hardware business which he carried on 
in London East, will remove on August 1 
to Huluth, Minn., and engage in paro- 
chial mission work in connection witli the 
American Episcopal Church. Mr. Han- 
nah's departure from London will be much 
regretted by his many friends. 
* * # 

The new factories recently started in 
this city, and the large additions which 
have been made to those already es- 
tablished, have brought a large number 
o( a good class of employes within the cor- 
poration. This has caused an unusual 
demand for dwelling houses, which greatly 
exceeds the supply, and rents for some 
time are likely to keep advancing. 

* * * 

Harry Culver, who was employed at the 
Globe Casket Works, died suddenly on 
Monday at his residence on Adelaide St. 
Deceased, who was 46 years of age, leaves 
a widow to lament his loss. 

* * * 

John A. Campbell, of John Campbell & 
Son, carriage builders, has gone on a 
business trip to the Northwest Territories. 

* * * 

William Trafford, of this city, was 
elected chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Retail Furniture Dealers' 
Association at the convention held in To- 
ronto last week. 

* # ♦ 

The remains of the late Isaac Waterman 
were yesterday interred in the family burial 
plot at Woodland. The funeral was one 
of the largest ever held in this city, and 
was an unmistakable evidence of the re- 
spect in which Mr. Waterman was held in 
the community in which he had spent the 




TUE 

Sherwin- 
Williams 

Aluminum Paint 

A SPECIALTY 
FOR FALL TRADE 

One of three specialties into 
which we will put extra push during 
the tall season. 

Its adaptability for so many uses makes 
it a ready seller — a household paint necessity. Place it in your 
stock and push it for use on heating stoves, gas stoves, hot water 
boilers, gas pipes, steam pipes, radiators, etc. ; a big output found 
in creameries, factories and office buildings. It's a metallic paint 
that stands extremes of heat and cold. It spreads easily and pos- 
itively has no bad odor. It sells well and wears well. 

We have a special plan for working up big business on Alum- 
inum Paint this fall. 

Use coupon today in writing for prices and information. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 

CLEVELAND, NEW YORK, NEWARK, SAN FRANCISCO, MONTREAL, TORONTO, WINNIPEG. 

CHICAGO, KANSAS CITY, BOSTON, LOS ANGELES, SAN DIEGO, MINNEAPOLIS. LONDON. ENO. 

CANADIAN DIVISION 
Headquarters and Paint Factory, 21 St. Antoitte St., Montreal; Varnish Factory, St. Fat- 
ick St., Montreal; Toronto Depot, 8b York St.; Winnipeg Depot, 147 Bannatyne St., East. 



greater part of his very active life.. The 
manufacturers were represented, mer- 
chants and professional men were in- 
cluded, and there were not a few from the 
workshops. The members of the City 
Council attended in a body, as did also the 
hospital trust. The pall-bearers were Geo. 
A. Somerville, T. H. Smallman, T. H. 
Purdom, K.C., Mayor Beck, Major Beattie, 
Thos. Alexander, M. G. Bremner and 
M. D. Fraser. In his position of organizer 
and president of The Imperial Oil Co. of 
Canada the deceased was well known to 
very many of the general and hardware 
merchants of the Dominion. His brother, 
Herman, died very suddenly at Buffalo 
Station last week when about taking a 
train to visit his brother at London. 

W. H. L. 



NEW MARLIN SHOT GUN. 

The Marlin Fire Arms Co., New Haven 
Conn., are placing upon the market a new 
9 



repeating lfj-gauge shot gun of superior 
design and finish. They state that it is 
the smallest and lightest weight repeating 
shot gun ever manufactured by them. It 
should, therefore, receive the favorable 
attention of all up-to-date sportsmen, to 
whom it will open up many new possibil- 
ities. It is a well-balanced, properly pro- 
portioned gun, which, with modern smoke- 
less powder, enables a shooter to use a 
powerful load in a small shell, and reduce 
materially the weight of shell and gun to 
be carried. The gun is made in three 
different grades. Grade A is made with 
26 or 28-in. barrel, six shots, weight about 
%% lb. Its list price is $:.'.">. Grade B 
weighs from 6', to i> ' 4 lb.; list price 
$32.75. Grade C weighs from (i ! 
t% lb.; list price $44. at;. \ .. :plete 
catalogue will be mailed by the makers, 
on receipt of three stamps tot pos 
to anyone mentioning Hardware and 
Metal. 



Hardware bnd 
M.-t.l 



HEATING AND PLUMB I NO 




ii\ 1 VRIO. 

H Mi i ral merchant, 

Port Lambton, has sold out to Mrs Ja». 

J. D. Sludge & Son, general merchants, 
d to Alex. J. Hi 

i the general business oi 
rnmon & Co . Williamstown, have 
sold. 

.1. E. Weeton, dealer in furniture, 
stoves and tinware, Tillsonburg, has 
compromised. 

Tucker <.v Vansicker, galvanized iron 
and roofers, Toronto, have dissolved 
partnership. 

The Smith's Falls Malleable Casting 
Co., Limited, Smith's Kails, have ob- 
tained a charter. 

The stock of the estate of J. D. Mc- 
general merchant, Bganville, is ad- 
vertised for sale. 

V. 1). McNaughton, general merchant, 
Copper (Mil?, has assigned to C. S. Scott; 
meeting of the creditors was held on 
July 23. 

U .1. Keyes, agent for agricultural 
implements, Axnprior, has assigned, and 
a meeting of the creditors will be held on 
July -2.'). 

QUEBEC. 

Francis 0. Ranger, general merchant, 
Montieal, has been registered. 

A. Joly & Co., painters, Montreal, 
have closed down. 

The American Axe & Tool Co., Mont- 
real, have been registered. 

Francois Cote cV Fils. masons, etc., St. 
Hi mi. have been registered. 

Laurence & Benoit, contractors, Mont- 
real, have dissolved partnership. 

The Royal Portland Cement Co., Lirn- 
iti-d. Montreal, have been incorporated. 

A demand of assignment lias been made 
on Phileas Dagenais, < arriage maker, 

Montreal. 

P. Blamhette, general merchant, Ste. 
Louise, has sold his stock at 55£c. on the 
dollar. 

The assets of the general businesss of 
Arthur & Cote, South Durham, have 
been sold. 

Hill & Co., manufacturers of boilers, 
steam generators, etc., Montreal, have 
been registered. 

Onesime Audet. general merchant, 
Grondines, has sold his stock at 51c on 
the dollar. 

The assets of the general business of 
F. F. Boy, Windsor Mills, are to be sold 
on August 4. 

Win. Mi Coliin-. general merchant, New 
Richmond, has assigned : Lefere & Tas- 
chereau, provisional guardians. 



The Iver Johnson Revolvers Have 
Shot Their Way To The Front. 



Absolutely 
Safe. I 

Accidental 
discharge is 
impossible. 



^._^ 



Absolutely safe, always reliable, ever 
accurate and true to aim, are sharp-shooting 
qualities of a revolver that no fortress of com- 
iietition can resist. Its 1 y employing these 
tactics of skill that 




Iver Johnson Revolvers Have Shot Their Way To The Front 



Send for Catalog 



Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works, 



New York Office: 99 Chambers St. 



FITCHBURG. MASS. 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 

F. Ferguson & Co., general merchants, 
Richibucto, have dissolved partnership. 

Mi-llor & Halfpenny, paints, etc., Vic- 
toria, have been succeeded by F. W. 
M.llor k, Co. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

C. F. Diamond, general merchant, Gold- 
fields, has removed to Camborne. 

MANITOBA AND NORTHWEST TERRITORIES. 

Thomas Stait, general merchant, Oak- 
ville, has sold out to D. A. Moore. 

John White, general merchant, Reston, 
is advertising his business for sale. 

Ephraim Rogers, general merchant, 
Methven, has sold out to Henry Collins. 

Wm. Stobart & Co., general merchants, 
Duck Lake, have been succeeded by H. 
Mitchel. 

The creditors of J. W. Lannin, general 
merchant, Bradwardine, are requested to 
file claims with A. E. Davey, Winnipeg. 

Wm. Henry, sr., of the firm of Wm. 
Henry & Son, general merchants, Tyn- 
dall, is dead. 

A. McLean will retire from The Wolse- 
ley Trading Co., Limited, Wolseley, on 
August 1. 



plain and Dorchester streets, presenting 
each with a life-sized portrait and a gold- 
mounted meerschaum pipe. Needless to 
say, they were entertained hospitably at 
both places, and a very enjoyable evening 
was spent. 

Mr. Carson and Mr. Moore left this 
week for Trembling Mountain for their 
holidays. 

When these two men commenced 
their apprenticeship fifty years ago, 
the foundry was near Papineau Square. 
Here the late George Rogers, formerly 
senior partner of the present firm, was fore- 
man, and Warden King, father of W.J. C. 
King, served his time. Since that time 
the foundry has continually expanded until 
it has reached its present great propor- 
tions. During all this time Messrs. Car- 
son and Moore have been steady, indus- 
trious employes, virtues which did not go 
unappreciated by the late proprietor, who 
gave them tangible evidence of his regard. 



FIFTY YEARS' SERVICE. 

FIFTY years ago Messrs. William Car- 
son and John Moore entered the 
employ of the firm now known as 
Warden King & Son, Limited, Montreal, 
and with that firm they have remained 
ever since. The half-century jubilee was 
celebrated by the other employes of the 
firm on Monday night, July 20, when some 
fifty men called first at Mr. Carson's resi- 
dence on City Councillors street and after- 
wards at Mr. Moore's, corner of Cham- 
10 



THE AUSTRALIAN CUSTOMS 
REGULATIONS. 

U. S. Consul-General J. P. Bray writes 
from Melbourne that the following order 
has been issued by the Australian Comp- 
troller of Customs : 

In view of the number of cases which have occur- 
red in which advertising matter is discovered in 
packages, though no mention of it is made in the 
nvoice, the acting minister directs that action be 
taken in regard to all advertising matter not shown 
in invoices and the goods forfeited by the depart- 
ment. Importers should be careful to see that all 
advertising matter is shown in the invoice. 

The forfeiture applies to the advertising 
matter in the packet only. Canadian ex- 
porters should note this. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY 




37-39 West Front Street, Toronto. 

Grain Cradles 

complete 
With Scythes 

and 
Ready for use. 



LIMITKI) 
ONLY 

WHOLESALE 



OTTAWA OR FRENCH MULAY 
Wood Braces or 
Iron Braoes. 



Hay Rakes, 
Scythe Stones, 
Grindstones, 

and 
Fixtures. 




* »•• 




HALF MULAY 

Wood Braces or 

Iron Braces. 



Scythes, 
Snaths, 

Cradle Fingers, 
Hoes, 

Manure Forks, 
etc., etc. 



TURKEY WING. 
Wood Braoes. 




IMPROVED MULAY. 
Wood Braces. 



Also 
Hay-Fork Pulleys, 
Hay Forks, 
Rope, etc. 




MORGAN. 
Wood Braces. 



Sen our HARDWARE Catalogue for a full lino of HARVESTING Tools. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. "-mo. Toronto. 



OUR PRICES 

ARE THE BEST. 



Orar-iam IMails are the Bos"t. 

Faotory i DufT»rin Straot, Toronto 
11 



WE SHIP 

PROMPTLY. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



u 



Good Cheer 




Hot Blast. 

THREE SIZES. 

The only stove of its kind made with 
grate operated from the outside, thus pre- 
venting escape of DUST when shaking. 
Also provided with large ash pan. 



Bright 
Steel Cook. 

Square or with Reservoir. Just the thing for "New Comers.' 

WE ALSO riAKE A FULL LINE OF 

Steel Ranges and Cooks. 
Cast Ranges and Cooks. 
Oak Stoves. 
Box Stoves. 
Cylinder Stoves. 
Air Tights. 
Base Burners. 
Farmers' Boilers. 

Write us for Catalogue. 




155 James Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited 



Temporary Warehouse foot of James Si. 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Woodstock, Ont. 



12 



M..t.lw..,. tm) 
M.-...I 




HOW TO PUSH STOVE SALES. 



By K. R. Munro, Montreal. 



TIM'', problem oi increasing Btove 
galea is an important one, for 
upon i lie quality of stove which 
a merchant sells am! tin- extent 
of his stove sales .\ ill depem I 
to a considerable extent the volume <>f his 
other business. A stove should la I 
a customer for years, and bence a 
Btove which gives good satisfaction 
should he a lasting ami valuable 
advertisement for the merchant 

It is of tlie utmost importance that the 
stow salesman should he a practical man 
with a thorough knowledge of his ware 
as well as an intelligent understanding 
of the various atmospheric aud climatic 
conditions with which his stoves must 
combat A stove is' often condemned 

because of a defective chimney. The 
stove man should be able to detect the 
cause of the trouble and save the reputa- 
tion of his stove. 

It is the general experience of stove 
11. en that it is I he best policy to special 
i/e upon one or two particular makes. 
These should he kepi prominently and 
persistent!} before the public eye. Your 

store should he well Known as the head 
quarters for these particular lines. 

Most retailers find that the local paper 
is the most effective advertising medium. 
The advertisement should be brief, catohy 
and to the point. Tell plainly and in 
as few words as possible the - special merit 
of your stoves and ranees. Be definite 
and truthful. Make no extravagant 
claims, hut lie prepared to make good all 
that you claim. 

Such advertising is sure to attract 

prospective buyers. They ".ill not pur- 
chase elsewhere before Seeing the lines 

which you have lieon advertising so per 
aistently. Rut an advertisement can do 
little more than bring prospective pur 
chasers to your store. All depends now 
upon the salesman and upon the impres 
sion which your store makes. 

rlence every attention should be paid 
io voui customers. People like to see a 
good assortment. Few people want to 
buy when there is only a small assort 
ment to be seen. Tt gives them a poor 
impression of the stock. 

Of course the bulk of the stove trade 
is done in the Fall and Winter months, 
but do not delay too long in preparing 
mm your stove campaign. Have a good 
assortment on hand by the end of duly, 
and from that time continue to "talk 



sto\ e" to VOUl u! omei s and to em 

phasi/e in j advertisements the mer 

if your sto\ es and ranges. 
Whenever a customer shows any intei 

est in your sto\es, it is good policy to 

follow up the campaign by Bending 

literature to his home. Haw (he Btove 
trade on \oiii mind and hoom it on all 
possible occasions. 

Abandon the idea th can be 

sold only in certain months. A range 
may he sold when a heater can not. 
Watch for new buildings aud make it 
a point to sell a sto\e for the new 

I Whim a couple are starting 

housekeeping remind them that the first 
thine required is one of your superior 
raii'.es or heaters. 

The secret of success in the stove trade 
as in all others IS well directed and per 

sistent energy. 



I 



STOVE TRADE OF BRITISH 
COLUMBIA. 

By Q, S H I'.i rv 
ESS than two decades ago when the 
. population of British Columbia he 
can to increase rapidly by inimi 
elation, caused by the expected arrival 
of the Canadian transcontinental line 
from the east, the newcomers fancied that, 
the semi-tropical climate of the coast 
sections of the province was of such a 
mild nature that there was no need to 
pay great attention to the problem of 
beating \t that time many of the 

buildings erected wore of a very light 

construction, and the heating applia 

installed were of the most meagre de 
scription. 

Nowadays that condition has 1 n 

materially changed. The houses and busi 

D blocks erected are of the hest con- 

struction, adapted to being Basil} w 
cil in Winter, and the heating sy 
put in are of the most approved type. 
Owing to the damp climate, the Winter 
being particularly so. and witli little or 
no dry frost. the favorite heating for 
HCeS in the cities of the coast dis- 
trict of British Columbia is by hot air, 
and the many types of furnaces built by 
eastern Canadian manufacturers are in 
common use. The objection to the dry 
heat of the hot air furnace, which has 
been the drawback in colder portions of 
Canada, especially iii Manitoba and the 
Northwest, where the frost prevents any 
moist nre in Winter, does not obtain here. 
In fact, the dry heat of the hot air 

13 



tor overcomes the tendency to damp 
getting into the b< u 

I'ol largl t he hot V, alel 1J ten, 

i the t'av. uit.v \o blocs of anj size i 
now built without the heating being put 

in, and. in mark ever} .. ■ il is by hot 

water radiators. The use of iteam i 
i ixtending, according to experience in 

\ ancouver, w hen- t here have been a 

of business blocks erected. 

Of com e there are on;.- blocks in which 

low pressure steam is installed, hut the 

majorit} have the hot water Bystem. 

\ i'.i ini, . .i t he heat ing arrai 
• pecially in pi i n this 

province, is the large number of fire 
places built in the houses It i- a gen- 
eral thing to see from one to three or 
more fireplaces in residences of any di 
mensions at all. Even in offices, and in 
suites of rooms in upper Mats of blocks, 

fireplaces are almost invariably put in. 

The reason of this verv general U 6 ol 

11 Id-fashioned fireplace i- partly Io be 

found in long established custom. 

Modern fireplaces, such a- are generally 

built in the houses of the coast cities, 

have polished oak mantels, with plate 
glass mirrors, embossed bronze fronts, 
and tiled Boors and side., forming an at 
tractive piece of furnishing for a room. 
The majority of the grates and mai 
used here an- imported from tie I ,,,,.., I 
States by the carload. 

Mantels are also brought in in the same 
way. As every architect includes 'at 
least one mantel in the specifications for 
ever} set of plans he draws, the trade is 
an extensive one. and in the past three 
or four years has grown considerably. 

In ordinar} heaters, the air-tight wood 
burner and the upright coal burner, of 
the Burlington type, seem to have tie 

preference in the province. The fuel used 
is entirely fir and cedar in wood, and 
soft coal from the bituminous mines of 
the island. in the interior there is some 
of the anthracite coal from the mines 
near Banff used, but hit iiniinous, or soft 
coal, is the general article where wood is 
not used. 

'I he firewood, in the shape of cordwood 
and in mill cuttings, and the cedar in 
'•locks from the shingle mills, is almost 
a- dear as coal now. owing to CO 
cutting and the high prices paid I 
Bterfi ; a criterion of the latter : 
tained from the fact that 
per day is the regular rate pair) a man 
and team for service- in ;i,. city. 
Vancouver, .inly 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




"Pandora" 
Range 









Entirely 
New 



Every part of the " Pandora " is made from entirely 
new designs. 

Body and leg base are extra heavy. 

Has rich, tasty nickel dress. 

Carving is of a bold, strong design with plenty of plain 
surfaces. 

High shelf and closet are made of sheet steel. 

Has oven-door thermometer, ventilated oven, etc. 



Triple Triangular Grates 



The grates have three bars 
and each bar is triangular in 
shape. 



The teeth are heavier and stronger than in two-bar grates — work better and last longer. 

Grates are fitted in a frame which slide on cast-iron rests, as shown in illustration — makes them easy to remove. 



Enamel 
Reservoir 



Reservoir is stamped in one piece from 
best grades of sheet steel. 

Is enamell d pure white and has a finish 
like marble. 

Can be used for almost any purpose 
from heating water to preserving fiuit. 

The " Pandora " is the only cast-iron 
range on the market fitted with enamel 
reservoir and triple triangular grates. 







s 



THE McCLARY MANLJI 

Head Offices and Works : London, Canada. Tinware Factories : 

Branch Warehouses : London, Toronto, Montreal 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




"Sunshine" 



3 



Furnace 



Burns coal, coke or wood. 

Extremely low setting allows the "Sunshine" to be set in low cellars, and 
also gives good elevation to warm air pipes. 

Radiators and dome are made from best grades of sheet steel. 

All parts exposed to wear are made extra heavy. 

Is easy to set up and always gives perfect satisfaction to your customer. 



"Famous Magnet" 
Furnace 



Burns wood only. 

Has large feed-door — will admit rough chunks. 

Has capacious ash-pit. Easy to clean. 

Is extra heavy and very durable. 

Its low setting makes it specially adapted for low cellars. 

Dampers control fire perfectly. 

Built in sizes to suit any building. 

The most successful wood furnace in Canada. 




SJt? CLARY 



CURING COMPANY 

london and Montreal. Foundries : London and Hamilton. 

Winnipeg, Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE MAKING OF A STOVE 



The Various Processes Described. 



^TO article comes into closer touch with 
y our daily life than the cooking stove 
or range, yet the processes by which 
these are produced, though comparatively 
simple, are understood by a vert- small 





Fig. i. — Tapping the Hot Iron. 

portion of the community. One of the most 
interesting booklets which Hardware and 
Metai. has ever received was issued some 
time ago by The Enterprise Foundry Co., 
Sackville, N.B., describing the various 
operations b}' which stoves and ranges 
are made. 

The chief raw material required by the 
stove-founder is, of course, pig iron. Accu- 
rate knowledge of the relative values of 
various brands of pig iron and careful at- 
tention to detail in its use are vital essen- 
tials to success in any foundry operation. 
Frequent tests are made by analysis, etc., 
to ensure the castings turned out being 
smooth and tough, which in the finished 
stove means increased beauty and dura- 
bility. 

The process of manufacture starts at 
the cupola, or furnace, into which the pig 
iron is put and from which it comes forth 
in molten condition. The first illustration 
shows several of the men waiting their turn 
to receive their share of the molten iron, 



which they take to the sand moulds they 

have spent a large part of the day in pre- 
paring. 

The art of moulding is perhaps the least 

understood of any of the processes of stove- 
making; so that, in ad- 
dition to the illustra- 
tions, we shall endeavor 
to briefly describe the 
process. Modern science 
has produced the mould- 
i ng machine, but the hand- 
moulding process is still 
in general use and is, 
therefore, described. 

First, the pattern is 
laid face down on a 
mould - board inside a 
wooden box or flask. 
The moulder then sifts 
through a riddle some 
fine moist sand, covering 
the pattern perhaps half 
an inch deep. Next he 
fills in the balance of the 
space with unsifted sand 
(Fig. 2) and packs it 
down with his rammer. 
The box is then covered 
and turned upside down, 
when, on removing the 
mould-board, the pat- 
tern is seen lying'on the 
closely-packed sand. 
A small quantity of 
dry parting sand is : 

sprinkled on the top sur- 
face of the mould, and 

another section of the 

flask, called the cope, is 

added, and in turn filled 

with closely rammed 

sand, the pattern, of 

course, being entirely 

buried in the middle of 

the two sections. One 

half of the box is then 

removed, exposing the 

pattern, which is rapped 

lightly with a mallet and 

carefully lifted or drawn 

(Fig. 3) from its own 

impression in the sand. 

To ensure a nicely- 
finished, smooth surface 
to the casting a facing of 
fine powdered lead is 
shaken over the mould. 
The two parts of the 
box, or flask, are then 
clamped firmly together, 
leaving in the sand a 

16 



hollow space the exact size and shape of 
the pattern, ready for the molten iron to be 
poured in through inlets made for the pur- 
pose. 

After the hot iron has had time to cool 
the castings are removed and piled up ready 
to be milled. 

Milling consists of carefully stowing the 
castings into heavy revolving cylinders, 
which removes the sand and thoroughly 
cleanses each piece. When the castings are 
removed from the mills all defective pieces 
are rejected and the perfect ones taken to 
the grindingroom, where the edges are 
thoroughly ground. They are then carefully 
piled away on shelves, a place being pro- 
vided for each part of every stove. 

By this time everything is ready for the 
mounter, who takes the castings (Fig. 4) 
and fits and bolts each piece carefully into 
its proper place, thus forming the completed 
stove ready for the inspector. An inspector 
examines each part to see that it is perfect 
in workmanship, fit and finish before it is 
allowed to pass his critical eye. If any 
detail is not as it should be, it is rejected 
until made so, when it is again inspected, 
and when finally passed, the stove is num- 
bered and labelled with the guarantee of the 
company, and is ready for the final process 
of polishing and removal to the warehouse 
until required for shipment. 

Perhaps one of the most interesting de- 
partments is that of nickel-plating. Here, 
at the head of this branch, surrounded by 
competent assistants and amid the whirr of 
wheels for cleaning, grinding, polishing and 
buffing, and tanks for the various processes 
of washing and plating, the plater takes the 
plain black castings in hand, and, after 
many immersions in the different baths and 




Fig. 2. — Filling up the Mould. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Established 1660. 



Incorporated 1695. 



"APOLLO" 






!| i"'i.ik 



mm 

:* , ; r fii 



Kitchen 
RNG n Range 
P 190 ? Boilers 



c4Wi 

mm v 

»t " 

ii I" 1 t 



GALVANIZED 

Made of "Apollo" Open- 
Hearth Steel. 

Severely tested at 200 lbs. be- 
fore galvanizing (making tight- 
ness doubly sure) and are 
perfectly galvanized inside and** 
out. A 




eturned 






7 

OUuuO 



" HERCULES" 

"Hercules" Darry Pails are made of X X 
Charcoal Tin, with heavy halls, malic- 
ableears, and X X X X retinned bottoms. 



Enamelled Ware 



OUK BRANDS : 

" CRESCENT," 
" COLONIAL," p 
" PREMIER," tx 
"STAR" A 

Deeorated and White. 






DAVIDSON'S 

Standard 
Flat Telescope 
Pleated Elbow. 



It has a continuous "Telescope Pleat," giving it 
all the strength of "Corrugated Iron" without 
the raised obstructions. 

It has TWENTY PLEATS, making it as SMOOTH 
inside and out as a length of stove pipe. 

It is especially adapted for air tights. 

It will not leak creosote. 

It is "long in the throat," making easy work 
putting up. 

Packed in special crates, ensuring delivery in per- 
fect condition. 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited, Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



tanks ucccssarv, produces that brilliant 
plated work which is so much appreciated 
by the baying public. 

Another interesting department is the 
pattern shop, where much labor is ex- 
pended in the preparation of uatterns (Pig. 
5) before they are ready to be taken in hand 
by the moulders. ' 



the little things and guard against waste 
as much as possible. A few years ago 1 
took hold of a foundry where I found 30 
tons of iron in the form of scrap buried in 
the ground. I at once had this dug up and 



FOUNDRY MANAGEMENT. 

N r operation can be depended 
upon to be a success unless 
it is carried on under the 
direction of an experienced and 
capable man. One writer expresses 
himself thus : " I think that the 
best results are obtained where 
the foundry foreman is at the head 
and everyone in or about the shop 
is under his control. This is due 
to the fact that there should be 
only one person to look to for 
orders. When the responsibility 
is divided it is always the other 
fellow who is to blame whenever 
anything goes wrong. Again, a 
set of shop employes are more apt 
to lose their respect for the fore- 
man when they find out that 
someone else has anything to say 
about the management of the works when 
they are inclined to look for authoritv from 
the quarter that promises them the most 
privileges. Xo body of workmen can be 
governed by two persons any more than an 
army can be successful if it is commanded 
by several generals, each having the same 
power. Xo two men can think alike in all 
things, and for these reasons I claim that 
a foundry foreman should have full con- 
trol of the foundry and be given full power 
to manage it as he deems best, and to him 
should be given the credit for its success or 
censure for its failure." 

An authority quoted a few weeks ago 
said: " The successful manager will watch 




Fig. 3 — Drawing the Pattern. 

dried and put through the rattler, when I 
used a few hundred pounds a day until it 
was all used up. Whenever owners of a 
foundry have a good foreman they should 
treat him right and give him to understand 
that they have confidence in him. When 
they furnish him what he 
requires to wdrk with in the 
way of material and equip- 
ment, then, and not until 
then, have they got a right 
to look to him for results.. 



There are to-day too many men acting in 

the^capacity of superintendents of plants 

who should be flask men, and I have seen 

many a foreman who was more competent 

to be superintendent than the one who was 

placed over him. The young men of ability 

should be promoted and encouraged in 

every way, as it is to them we 

must look for foundry managers 

in the future." 



THE PIECE RATE SYSTEM. 

In a comprehensive paper on 
the above subject read before the 
American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers, F. W. Taylor treated 
on a subject essential to successful 
foundry practice. His chief aim 
was expressedly "to advocate the 
accurate study of ' how long it 
takes to do work,' or scientific 
time study as the foundation of 
the best management. The other 
important object in its prepara- 
tion was the advocacy of coupling 
high wages for the workman with 
low labor cost for the employer. 
The losses in manufacturing grow- 
ing out of lack of the best system 
are due to two causes chiefly. First and by 
far the most important is the profound 
ignorance of employers and their foremen 
as to the time in which various kinds of 
work should be done — an ignorance largely 
shared by the workmen. Second, indiffer- 
ence of employers and ignorance of the 
proper system to adopt and the method of 
applying it, and as to the individual charac- 
ter, worth'and welfare of their men." 



^" <^wf 0-tW /flp^a 4< 





Fig. 4. — A Corner of ihr Mounting Shop. 



18 



Fig. 5. — Preparing a Pattern. 



HARDWARE AND MHTAL 



Telephone City "JESS! 'Wood Stoves 






to 

-O 
(0 



c 

>t 
c 




WRITE FOR CIRCULAR AND PRICES. 

Telephone City Stoves, Limited 

BRANTFORD, CANADA. 




mt*n*m*»+t 



Stove Bricks, Asbestos, 
Furnace and Stove Cement. 

Nothing better made in this country. We 
use onl) the besl Imported Fire Clay. So good 
have been the Bru ks made by us that we enjo) 
the favors of stove dealers everywhere. Over 
300 styles of Bricks ti» choose from. When in 
trouble communicate with us. 

Have you inquiries from teachers of cHina 
paintirigfor MUFFLE KILNS.- If so, you 
can proeuie same from us. Also Assaying 
Crucibles, as good as any imported and 
i heaper. hire (.'lay in packages 01 bulk. 

CATALOQUE AND PRICES ON APPLICATION. 



, 



, 



BRACONDALE P.O. 
ONTARIO. 



JONES BROS., 
nmmmwrn 



■ 



A. Good Reputation is a Merchant's Greatest Asset. 

When you sell an article, the purchaser takes it 
on your recommendation. If that article doesn't live 
up to your promises, it is you the public blames -they 
look to you for redress. When you sell them a good 
article to you belongs the praise — and the profit. The 

Imperial Oxford Range 

is an easy stove to sell. Our advertising is 
strong and convincing, and the range lives up 
hi every claim we make. Everyone who has 
used an Imperial Oxford Range is drumming 
i i I > business tor you amongst their friends. 
Thai is why it is an easy range to sell -be- 
cause it lias BO many good talking points, 
and so many know by experience how good 
it is. 




THE GURNET FOUNDRY CO., Limited 

WINNIPEG. TORONTO. VANCOUVER. 
Tilt GLRNtY-HASSEYlCO., Limited, - MONTREAL. 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A PROGRESSIVE ST 3VE FOUNDRY 

I"*| U oncerns which have started dur- 
the 1 ii- 1 few years have 
in to congratulate them 
selves on the results than have The 
u in Foundry Co., Ltd., Wingham, 
Out. This firm started business lust 
September with one line of ranges, the 
■'Ciown Huron," the reputation of which 
is abroad) national. The company have 
since added to their line the "Royal 
Huron" wood rook. Huron" steel plate 
"Huron Chief" heavj steel plate 
French hotel range and "New Ontario" 
steel camp stove. All of these ranges are 
modern and up-to-date, embracing everj 
i hino of the most approved and unique 
designs in stove construction. Their 
property comprises 3| acres of ground 
situated on both the Grand Trunk and 
(' I' K.. with sidings into the premises. 
The buildings are as follows: Mount 



miles north of London, is situated in one 
of tin' richest and mosl fertile farming 
districts in Ontario, and is the site of 
several enterprising furniture manufac 
lories, 

GOOD CHEER" STOVES AND 
RANGES 

The las. Stewart Mfg. ('<>.. of Wood 

stock, Out., know a good thine when 

they see it. and for many years have used 
"Hardware and Metal" as a medium to 
le1 other people Know what good things 

are turned out from the Woodstock 

Stove Works. In this issue they show 

two stoves specially adapted t<> the re 
quirements of the trade ol the Great 
Northwest, a trade to which they 
have catered for over thirty years. .(. 
II. \shdown. Winnipeg, having Ween their 
representative for that length of time. 
Mow, however, the demands created in 



known as "Stewart." If "Good Cheer" 

-loves are not handled in your town it 
will pay yoll to write for a catalogue and 
secure necessarv information to start an 
agency, 

ANOTHER NEW HEATING COMPANY. 

A rising industry of great importance 
is the manufacture of sto\es. furnaces, 

radiators. etc.. to he carried on exten- 
sively by The Canadian Heating and 
Ventilating Co., Ltd, The officers are 

as follows : President. \. A. Ilnishau ; 

vice-president and manager, W, J. Chris 
tie; sec. -treasurer, W. S. Middlebro' ; 

directors. J, II. McLauehlan. -I. II. 
Christie, J. A. Ellis, Thus we see that 

the executive is largely composed of 
Owen Sound business men. which fact is 
sufficient to convince anyone thai it will 

prove a profitable investment. This 
company, with an authorized capital of 



RETU 




ing -hop. 50xl00-ft, : boiler and engine 

house, 25x40-ft., fitted with 50 horse 

power Corli-- engine : molding -hop, 60 
x 120 ft. ; storehouse, 60xl50-fi< together 

with coal. coke, sand anil facing sheds. 
The entire plant is lighted with both 
acetylene gas and electric light. 
In some quarters the impression has 

got about that this company were as-o 
eiated with a departmental -tore. 'Hard 
wan- and Metal" is authorized to deny 
this : to state that the firm are entirely 
independent ; that their success has not 
been due to the good-will of any linn. 
but rather of the trad.- throughout Can 
ada. whose good will has been secured 
through the appearance, quality and fin 
iah of their productions. 

The accompanying view of the wmks 
gives a good impression to the reader. 
Windham, the town in which they are 
situated, is a bright, progressive town 
..f about 3,500 inhabitants, about 70 



View of The Western Foundry Company, Limited. 

the western provinces by the unprecedent- 
ed rush of new settlers from all civilized 
countries, have attained such proportions 
that The dames Stewart Co. have found 
it necessary to open a branch in Winni- 
peg in order the better to meet the 
wants of this great western market, and 
they now carry a full line of stoves and 
ranges in their temporary warehouse 
which is located on the line of the Can- 
adian Northern Ky.. at the foot of .lame- 
street, under the care of Mr. H. O. 
Bailey who will hereafter represent them 
in the' west and promptly fill all orders 
intrusted to him. 

Some years ago the Stewart company 
adopted and registered the name "Good 
('heer" as a distinguishing mark for their 
line of stove- and ranees, and since then 
all their new cook stoves, ranees and 
heaters have been marketed under this 
name. The older patterns, which however 

they are gradually dropping, are still 
20 



$200,000 and a subscribed capital of 
$75,000, has secured a desirable site of 
i line acre- north of The Imperial Cement 
Works and the preparations for the huge 
buildings were begun some time ago. 
the manufacture of stoves, furnaces and 
radiators will constitute the principal 
function of the plant, and the ventilat- 
ing, though by no means unimportant, 
is a secondary consideration. The con 
Cern will be a truly up to date establish- 
ment. The liujlierotis buildings will be 
constructed to fulfil the requirements of 
the machinery, which will' lie of a scien- 
tific and thoroughly modern type. The 
factory will be even more remote from the 
Centre of business than The Impel lal 
Cement Works, (but in close proximity to 
the C.P.R. tracks, from which will extend 
a sidine to the works.) A dock will he 
constructed, thus enabling the company 
to convey their coal, coke and pie iron 
directly from the boat to their furnace- 
I iv the latest labor saving devices.— -Owen 
Sound Time-. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CHARCOAL 



For Tinsmiths--profitabie. 

(1) For your own use In soldering. 

(2) To sell for heating. For summer Ores, for campei 

for a qulci 1 i^ liter for coal. 

For Hardware Dealers- 



Profitable. 



To sell for heating. For summer I 

for campers' use, tor ■ quick lighter for coal. 



Good every month In the year, therefore is staple. 
PAYS A (iOOI) PROFIT. 



Shipped in carload lots in bulk, in 
less than carloads in jute sacks, hold- 
ing about '."., bushels each, and 



20 pounds to the bushel. 

for Quotations and Freight Rates Address Head Office 



Shipped from . . . 
Toronto. Montreal, Long- 
ford Mills, < in r., Fjuzlou 
Falls, Ont., and Cook- 
shire, Qui. 



The Standard Chemical Co. 



Our charcoal is made from the 
best hardwood only Canada 
can grow — Canadian all the 
way through. 



OF TORONTO LIMITED 

Gooderham Building, 

TORONTO. 



The Rochester 
Lamp Co. 



The leading Lamp House 
of Canada in *m. 

OIL and (IAS LAHPS, for 

Store, Hall ami House lighting. 
Our large Stoic Lamps are rec- 
ognized superior to all others. 
We have the most perfect up- 
to-date oil-heating 
Parlor stove on the 
market, a delight to 
have when the cool 
evenings begin. 

All information 
freely furnished on 
application. 






Lamii Co. 



24 front hi. West, 
TORONTO 




K 



Time-Tried and Fire-Tested. 

Quality and Class 




count for more in a STOVE or RANGE 

•than iiiTiyy other article of 

domestic use 




Guarantee 



TKe "Treasure* 

Trade Mark 

IS AN 

Absolute Guarantee 

or BOTH 

Quality and Hig'H Class. 




ART TREASURE. 



TREASURE D3UBLE-HEATER. 



THE D. MOORE COMPANY, Limited, HAMILTON, ONT. 



MANITOBA DEPOT: 

ii 7 Bannatyne St. East, WINNIPEQ. 
HERRICK, ANDERSON & CO. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA AGENCY 
JOHN BURNS, JR.. 
VANCOUVER. 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE " PANDORA " RANQE 

THIS already famous range makes its 
how to the trade elsewhere In 
this; issue ol "Hardware and 
The novel plan adopted by The 
Co. in securing a name for 
tlu-ir new ranee created a great deal ol 
interest among the laities throughout the 
country and gave the Pandora more pub 
licity than months of advertising in the 
ordinary way would have done. As has 
already been stated in these columns. 
21,000 names were suggested bj 
- from Halifax to Vancouver. After 
the decision was made and the prizes 
awarded the McClary company sent lei 
ters to every ladj who had sent in a name. 
In this letter they gave the names and 

addresses of the winners of the six prizes 

offered, thanked the ladies for their ef- 
forts in the matter, gave some interesting 
information as to the number of names 
offered, the difficulty of making- a choice, 
and promised to send them an illustrated 
iptive booklet on the range as soon 
as it should be gotten out. The result 
has been that the ladies have developed 
an interest almost akin to curiosity in 
the " Pandora." and the McClary com 
pany have received innumerable inquiries 
about the range and requests for cata- 
logues from all parts of the country. A 
very complete booklet is now being 
printed ami a copy will be mailed to 
every lady who sent in a name. In ad- 
dition to this the " Pandora" will be 
extensively advertised in all Canadian 
newspapers and magazines from August 
until Christmas, by which time it should 
be one of the best-known ranges on the 
market. 

When viewing the " Pandora," the 
writer was specially impressed with the 
solidity and handsome appearance of the 
range. The body and leg base are very 
heavy, while the carving is of a bold, 
strong style with plenty of plain surfaces, 
which give a harmonious effect to the 
heavy parts. The nickeling is very 
lavish, but is placed with good taste, 
and makes a rich contrast with the highly 
polished body and sheet-steel high shelf 
and warming closet. Asked if the oven 
is ventilated and fitted with thermometer, 
etc., the McClary stove expert replied 
that it had all such features as these and 
a few which are entirely new and are 
. found on no other range. One new fea- 
ture upon which he laid particular stress 
and which he claims is entirely new, is 
the enamel reservoir. It is stamped in 
one piece from sheet steel, and is enam- 
eled pure white The makers claim that 
this reservoir is so clean and free from 
taint that it can be used for almost any 
purpose from heating water up to boil- 
ing fruit, and its smooth and clean finish 
would seem to give ample justice to the 
claim. Another strong point in the 



" Pandora," to which he particularly 
referred, is the grate arrangement. The 
are Composed of three triangular 
shaped liars with short strong teeth. 
The bare are held in a frame which rests 
on cast iron slides, which enable the grates 
to be easily withdrawn. The frame is 
held in place by a cap which can be re- 
moved by partly unscrewing one bolt. 
The " Pandora" lias many other strong 
points, and from the description given to 
the writer, should prove to be one of the 
most popular and best sidling ranges on 
the market. 

THE "TELEPHONE CITY" STOVE. 

WK are pleased to give our readers 
some information regarding the 
new air-tight top-draft wood 
stove patented recently by J. B. Turner, 
of Brantford, Out. It is. called the 




"Telephone city Stove. 

"Telephone City" and will be made and 
sold by Telephone City Stoves Limited, of 
Brantford, with Henry Yeigb president 
and managing director and •) . B. Turner, 
vice president . 

The illustration shows the general fea- 
tures of this new claimant for approval. 
Prominent among these features are : 
The outer top draft tube, which cannot 
be burned because it does not come in 
contact with the fire and cannot be 
broken when putting fuel into the stove. 
The top is removable, making it easy to 
replace the lining at the home. The 
22 



steel lining is four gauges heavier than 
ordinary and extends from top to bot- 
tom of the stove. The condenser and 
check-draft are combined in one and cffec- 
tively prevent candensation. The patent 

COVers the use of a detachable oven which 
will prove of great convenience in many 
homes. The oven is sold as an extra 
A steel lid with a handle is furnished 
with each stove and with its use sad 
irons can be heated and ordinary cook- 
ing done. The stove is well made and 
handsome in appearance and should prove 
a fast seller. 



FIRE BRICK. 

Jones Bros., Bracondale, Ont., manu- 
facture 300 different styles of stove linings, 
and supply fire brick for practically every 
make of stoves sold in Canada. Stock is 
always carried and orders can be promptly 
filled. The business of Jones Bros, has 
grown steadily, due to the excellence of 
.•Eheir brick. They use an imported clay 
specially adapted to this business. They 
also make muffle or furnace kilns for china 
painters' use. Another line is assaying 
crucibles. This article is generally im- 
ported, but when it becomes known that 
a crucible of first-class quality is produced 
in Canada, Jones Bros, are likely to 
develop a good trade in a new direction. 



FUEL ECONOMIZERS. 

Housekeepers are always interested in 
anything that reduces fuel bills. The 
Fairgrieve Mnfg. Co., Limited, have 
worked to good purpose in devising kit- 
chen stove furniture whose chief function 
is to economize fuel. Their "Quick Meal" 
saucepans i;t three pieces, when assembled, 
are so compact that they all fit over one 
stove lid or hot plate. Gas ovens consti- 
tute another line. These are asbestos- 
lined and double-walled to prevent heat 
waste through radiation. Charcoal stoves 
for quick cooking and for campers' use 
have been popular. The Fairgrieve gas 
toaster has had an immense sale. A re- 
cent Fnglish order called for 20 gross of 
this excellent article. Steam cookers, two, 
three and four sections, are highly es- 
teemed by their users, both for their econ- 
omy and for the thoroughly-cooked food 
resulting from their use. The Fairgrieve 
Mnfg. Co. state they are the only Cana- 
dian makers of asbestos mats, a singular 
tiling in this country, where asbestos has 
its home. One more line that may be 
mentioned is stoveboards, made of straw- 
board covered with metal. This makes a 
substantial, very light and very cheap 
stoveboard. 



Hardware and 

M.ul 



THE FURNACE TRADE 



HEATING AND VENTILATING BY WARM AIR 

FURNACE.* 

A Practical Treatise on the Subject. 



MUCH has been written upon 
lliis subject, and many ideas 
have been advanced, some <>f 
which have stood the test 
of practical application, 
while others bave proved to be the pet 
plans of mere theorists. It is therefore 
not our intention to enter into an ex- 
tended discussion of scientific heating and 
ventilation. Our aim is to give only a 
lew general laws which experience hus 
shown to bo practical, and the common 
sense principles of sanitary heating and 
ventilation employed in the erection of 
warm air furnaces. 

FLUR ARRANGEMENTS. 

The most important factor in connec 
tion with the successful working of a 

heating apparatus of any description is 
the draft in the chimney ; without this 
everything else is a failure, and the pru- 
dent furnace man, in undertaking to 

*Fr ••m a hook ci | n pared l>y The Gurney- 
'1 iiden Co., Ilamil 01. 



warm a building, should make a thor 
OUgfa examination of the chimney . and 

satisfy himself tlmt there is sufficient 
draft in chimney to carr\ I lie apparatus 
lie intend-: tO 001 Ci thereto. And if lie 

is not satisfied with draft, he should 

draw t lie proprietor's attention to it, 
and point out the defects and have them 
remedied before going further. 

This will (dear away all the unpleasant- 
ness that arises from a heating appara- 
tus that is not giving satisfaction 
through the fault of a bad chimney. 

SELECTING THE PROPER SIZE FURNACE. 

Having decided that the flue arrange- 
ments are all right, the ne\t important 
item in connection with a heating plant 
is the proper size furnace required to do 
the; work. This depends in great mea- 
sure on the good judgment of the furnace 
man, there being no fixed rules for hirn to 
be guided by, except the cubical contents 
of the building to be heated and the 
heating capacity of the furnace. 



II" -c cannot always be relied upon : 
For in tance, a oertain size furnace may 
be capable' of warming a building having 

-'"J 1 mbic fed of an space in a certain 

location, while it would prove a failure 
in another building with the same cubic 
contents, but of differenl construction. 

and a location where it would be mole 

ed to the prevailing winds, also 

hnviiiu moil- exposed glaSf and wall sur- 
face. 

It is advisable in tin- regard to take.' 
into consideration the following poi 

(1) Material construction of build 

(2) Wall and glass exposure ; (3) Cubi 
cal contents ; (4) Number of hot air 
pipes and length of same, and ■ 
building is well built and furnace- can >. t 
in a central position, it is advisable to 
-elect a furnace having a heating capacity 
one third greater than the cubical con- 
tents of building to be heated. 

KKCISI IKS. 

Would advise the placing of registers 
in the floor on the first storey, and as 
near the furnace as possible. 

Whatever advantage there is in loca- 
ting registers in the cold side of a room, 
it is more than oil set by having longer 




RETURIS-ED 



BASEMENT 




fIRST FLOOR PLAN 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



and natural!) less elevation to 
tli. in. 

On the sir- 1 Btorey floor registers are 
preferable ti> -i»l>' wall registers, w hi )«■ <>n 
t )■<• upper Btoreys the latter may be used 
ti> advanti 
Our table of capacities of pipes and 
which are reproduced, maj en 
tilth- anyone iii select registers of proper 

CAPAOTV OP PIPES AND REUISTERS 

II,, I Mi PI 







I'l.iUJi 


!. r 


AlLtt. 


Diameter. 


Area 






in 




aq. iii 


in 


sq 111 






a 




,. 11 


as 


. 380 






u 




.154 


94 


452 






16. 




'.ill 




. 531 






is 






28 


. 616 










314 


30 


. 707 



Boi \ d KKorarata 

iiae of Open- 8i*e ol Open- 
Capacity, ing. Capacity. Lag Capacity 

in. sq in in. sq. in. in. aq in 

7 » IS . 20.... 8C8 

33 14 103 24 301 

IS 16 134 30 471 

10 18 169 36 679 



We can give no definite instruction as 
to size of beating pipes and registers, but 
usually recommend for first floor .'—Boom 
12x14, use i i in. pipe with 9x12 register; 
room MxlN Us,- |u in pipe with 10x14 
register; room 16x20, use II in. pipe 
with 12x15 register; ordinary halls, use 
1 1 in. pipe with 12x15 register. Second 
floor :— Room I "\"J"J. use * in. pipe with 
(i\IH register ; room I2\l I. use '.I in. pipe 
with 8x12 register; room I 1x20, us,, in 
in. pipe with 9x14 register; for large, 
hulls, use lii-iii. pipe with 10x15 register. 

THE CELLAR AND LOCATION OF FURNACE. 

\- a general rule the furnace should be 
set in the cellar at a point equally dis 
taut from the several registers located in 
the rooms on the ground floor. 

Should the building be isolated or ex 
posed to high winds set the furnace so 
that the pipes running to the north and 



made large enough to form a (ray or 
hearth in front of the furnace, and leave 
I'lentN of room (or the op, ■nine' of the ash 
pit door. 

PIPING. 

Both hot air and smoke pipes should 
be free from abrupt turns and elbows, 
and given all the elevation possible, having 

at least l.j in. rise to tile foot, and as 
much more as height of cellar will allow. 

If rooms are so located in reference to 
furnace that there must he considerable 
difference in length of heat pipes, the 
longer pipes should be larger than the 
shorter ones, provided that those of both 
lengths are expected to carry the same 
volume of hot air. 

For example, take two rooms, each 
15x20, one is so located that it requires 
a pipe eight feet lone-, the other a pipe 
20 feet long, the short pipe should have 




UftNEQ 



BED ROOM 



BED ROOM 









return 
JUL 1 







ATTIC 



-VI M:E REGISTERS. 

Size of Open- Size of Open- Size of Open- 

ing. Capacity in;,'. Capacity. ing. Capacity. 



6x10 
8x10 
8x12 
8x15 
9x12 
'.' v 14 
10 x IS 

Mameter 

of |ii!«- 
in. 


BO, 

. 40 

04 
80 

n 

-i 

80 

RA1 

en 
i 


n. 

10 1 

10 X 

12 x 
12 x 

14 X 
1". X 

16 \ 
rEOF A 

lie fi pe 

iiiiiiin- 

5 i". 
2.181 

8.720 
13,635 
19,635 

20,725 
341971 

11.17- 

66;690 

92,170 
106.900 

122,780 


14 


sq. in. sq. in. 
93 20 x 20. . . . 307 


16 . 

15 
19 

22 
23 

•J! 

IK I 

- 


. . 107 20 x 24 320 

.120 20x26 347 

151 21 x29 406 

.205 27 X 27 486 

250 27x18 684 

256 M x 30 600 

)ISCHAR0E* 

Diametei Cubic ft. ]>er 
of pipe. minute, 
in. 
16 139.626 


■J 






17 157,02', 

18 170.713 


4 






19 190.895 


5 


7. 

9. 






20 . 218,166 

21 240,528 

22 203.981 

23 288,525 

24 314,10:> 


10 

11 
12 
13. 






26 368,700 

27 397.609 

28 427,605 


14 
IS 






29 158,695 



"The reh) iiy. 10J ft per minute ai the entrance 



west rooms shall be somewhat shorter 
than those running to the south and east 
rooms. 

The cellar should be at the very least 
six feet high, and is much better if it is 
seven feet. In short, just all the depth 
of cellar possible ever remembering that 
it is absolutely necessary to have a good 
rise or pitch to the warm air pipes to 
insure a rapid How of warm air. 

Remove any obstacle that may be in 
the cellar that would prevent the proper 
location of the furnace, and do not fail 
or neglect to die; a pit for the furnace if 
the cellar is not high enough, thus lower 
ing the furnace ami getting sufficient rise 
for the pipes. 

Should it be necessary to dig a pit into 
which the furnace >hall be set. have it 

2-1 



inche 



nd the long 



a diameter of nine 
pipe of I I inches. 

The diameter of hot air pipes should be 
arranged. in reference to the number of 
pipes to be taken from the furnace. If 
their number is large the diameter of 
each should be less, and their diameter 
larger if their number be small. 

Pipes leading to perpendicular flues con 
ducting hot air to second and third 
floors should be one-third smaller than 
those leading to rooms on the first floor. 

Forcing a volume of hot air through a 
lone pipe, where there are shorter pipes 
connected to the same, furnace, is one of 
the greatest obstacles encountered by the 
novice in furnace work. This can be 
overcome, and in some instances good re 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



They are the means of Selling Property 

and Securing Tenants. 



iu> .-, -.uinl floor, lurg- lui, 

by one hund. td and forty. 



«e, ail 



S'i /l<*r.— MAlTLAND ST., near 
• » B t.^»> Jarvtn best value In Tor- 
onto, ten rooms. Pease furnace und nil 
mouurn IniprovLmcntB. 

Q-J UftK IA.NMNG AVE . "KinK's 

-* ^ a* »•/»*« JBim Villa," brAp-* now, mo«* 
•\> -u. s -do' 

- and bt. 
-laurudry with p >, 
tor la.. 

• . •>. ^Hft/sonii- leta mm, tiew, soild 
brick, Btorie ami bri.'k foundation, con- 
crrtu cellar. Pease furnace. ou/fu lar^r 
rooms, square hall, laundry tuba, five 
hundred caun. tttt Victoria. 

i |fe*-l 1 l\t\— ~N»iqHBOtJ*LHOQD of 

;•;••♦>.. I 1M 'Carlton ana Berkeley 

oeml-detached, solid brick, 11 rooms 
|ba,th, Pease furnace :_'(( Victoria. 

' <*•» rj ~. (^ ~* ' ■"'■' DEN I SOTS*"a" V" teNtJST 
', 4 »i» <* r' " and evarv 



J'-Kast. 
p!»ne Ma* 



<fj ott 

•3*5 H-it; -v-. ■ Tcomu, new 

»!»U(vp.* plumbing. Pease furnace, nuw- 
ly dwoi'Hi-d, Immodlato possession. 

.1*00 



'XtB'AWX NO AD. J inaction, brick. 
•~ ->n«. Ap>' - Itlfl "» **"' 



V 



o*, ... , 

'ranee, 
avenue. 



->m». ^■iu— 
Aj>ply 55 West k. 






£1 'Vflft - NEIW eolld brick dwell- 
& 1 • 4 wlflw;, jJjrock avo., 6 rooms, 
bathroom, Poaso furnace, hot and cokj 
water, guarant' :n;. very easy 

terms. 3'J Confederation Life Bldg. 



4:1 VJWl- BUSKIN AVE., detach 
<Ji© I »Ot/V-d coitap- 



->-v, o rooms, 
hot n- 
Vle' 



l&S OOtftT A >? :NU .K KD., very S ood 
". ,v ' n -' location for j-rofesflonul 
man, 12 rooms and bath,, four tra'es 
Pease furnace, open plumbing, the 
wh ole lii e xcellent eondltion. 

"vldr 



'* i>" fun 



iy 
o- 

no ) 
der , 

po. 

-» re 






..*awi 106d ; moK<o 
oant 



ffij.i T/Wl— $">00 CASH, will b-.iy new 
V»)t(VVnln» ro ;n<-d ns.dence. 
Square hail, perfect o.>- -."i plumbing v» .". . 
ojm! bath separate handsome mantelH. 
combination grates. Pease combli itlon 
furnace, mc-s'.iy l~ot v.i.t-r, cement cellar 
floor and walks, wide verandah, towl- 
taijy la v.i i, aide entrance, bu'lt under 
tmliq tho supervision of an architect, choice 
location, immediate possession. WllilBi 
1 Toionto street 

1 n SE2LBY~BT, . $4,800, only $1,000 
I. « *>eh, wl/.l b> 



•bli 



•-rt. 



Tongo 3treet. ■ — 

S3 2()0'u"^S"-^^n bC S 



ce, laundry, •J!^ l ag^- X 5jl t 
St.. twe- 



cn<mplt.'i 



•t^ 



v* r *»- T ^Beverley 



^j rooms 



fronlage, nt,..' corner Aval.. 

Stiei^t. "WliliR, 1 TarO QtO btj-e. 

E' r XECTJTOR8' sale, 98.076 will buy a 
:i!no roomed, modern, brick house. 
In first-class repair. Pease furnace; 
near Yenjrc street. Willis, 1 Toronto 
street. 



SI Qd\f\ WlI,L buv rorner store and 
1 oOl/IJawelllp 



tinted lr~~v- 



l» 

*■ 
e 

t 



•JT. Iteeve, iv 



Bay street, Toronto. 

5770-^4 "sTf VJNCHINT ST„ detached 

C*t>/Ji5 r i C k bouse, nln:5 rooms, open 
plumbhiji. Pease furnace. Just now be- 
Injj papered. 240 



HOUSS5 WANTED. 



-tv"iuenti,a/uie/- 1> 



The above is a reproduction of TEH SEPARATE ADVERTISEMENTS, which appeared in 
one recent issue of The Toronto Evening Telegram. Advertisements of this kind have been 
appearing daily for years. Could any more conclusive evidence be asked as to the place which 
Pease Economy Heaters occupy in public opinion ? 



VVVVVVVV\AA^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV» 



J. T. Pease Furnace Co., 

LIMITED 

TORONTO 



■i:> 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



suits obtained, 1>\ the pipe with 

veting u oon 
ducting shield t«> inside of casing mound 
the Upper half i>i" hot air oollar. 

DAMI'I !{■-, 
|ht> should be lilted in all luil an 

l*i] k~ close lo collars on casings or brick 
work. rhie enables the operatoi to 
the heal through i h>- different 
pipes, and also iu curtail the supplj of 
an b hi pipe which is drawing 

more air than 1^ required to heat the 
innected \\ ith. 

PIPE COVERING. 

t overing pipes in cellar with asbi 
sheeting, or some othei non-conducting 
material, will prevent the loss of heat by 
radiation and promote column ill fuel, 
and is to be recommended whether pipes 
ai<' long or short. Its benefits are mosl 
perceptible where pipes have very little 

ele\ ation. 

Perpendicular pipes in partitions, being 
covered with asbestos sheeting, are safei 
and less liable to radiation than pipes 
where the studding* ale lined and sheeted 

incr with tin or metallic laths. 

COLD A1K BOXES. 

The cold air box should be constructed 
of galvanized iron or wood, tongued and 
grooved, ami planed smooth inside, lis 

opening should lie toward the point from 
which the eold winds blow (eenerallv 

west or southwest); carry it along the 
ceiling to within three feet of furnace, 
and connect the balance with galvanized 
iron to bottom of brick work or casings, 
as the case maj be. 

This box should contain a damper or 
slide, which, in very cold weather, or 
when the lire is kindled, can be partially 
closed. 

It often occurs that it is almost im- 
possible to take the cold air box from 
the points as stated above, and in such 
cases would recommend the building of a 
cold air loom in the cellar, say about 
7\T. and take the air supply from it to 
the furnace. By this means the furnace 
will have a steady supply of air, no mat 
fcer which way the winds blow, or uiii' 
ther travelling tine.- ,, r 25 miles an hour. 

The i-apacity of the eold air box taken 
from the outside of building should lie at 
least 75 per cent, of the combined area 
of hot air pipes leading from furnace. 

We do not recommend taking the cold 
air supply to furnace from the outside of 
building only, excepting where the venti- 
lation has to be rapid and is provided 

for ill such buildings as schools and lm- 

pitals. The majority of building 
constructed that there are no1 enough 
vents to allow sufficient cold air to be 
taken out to heat the same properly, and 
in such cases it i~ necessary to have cold 
air diet- taken from halls and exposed 



rooms that have no means of sxhausti&g 
the cohl air from them Ducts from in 
side of building should have a capacity 
equal to the combined area of all the hot 

an pipe- taken from furnace. 

In private dwellings, the cold air sup 
|)l\ to furnace should be taken from both 

inside and outside of building, with a 

damper in each for regulating the supply 

of air to the furnace according to the 

weather outside. 

In stores and churches, (he air supply 
to furnace should invariably be taken 
from the inside of building, The constant 

opening and closing of doors in stores 
will allow in enough fresh air to supply 
furnace Churches being empty during 
tin' week, the air is pure, and having to 
I e heated in short space of time, the 
only reliable means to accomplish the 
same is bv arranging the ducts as slated 
above. 




CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

STOVES, RANGES AND FURNACES. 

The Enterprise Foundrj Co., Sackville, 

\.B., have recently issued a new and 
handsome catalogue and price list of 
their extensive line of stoves, ranees and 
furnaces. The catalogue is an exceeding- 
ly handsome one and as it is well illus- 
trated throughout it should be of special 

value to the trade. I he Enterprise 

Company offer a large assortment of new 
and desirable patterns which have lately 

been added to their stock. They call 
attention to several new and important 
improvements. Their uew "Sterling 
range, lilted with patent removable rails 
thej claim should be a trade winner. The 

catalogue should be of value for refei 

ence. Stove dealers who mention "Hard 
ware and Metal" mav have a copy upon 
application. 



ROOFING MATERIAL. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited, 
loionio and Montreal, are issuing to 
the trade a new price list and cat 
alogue. The book contains many 
valuable hints as to roofing material 
and directions as to the best methods of 
roofing. It will be of interest and profit 
to all merchants who handle roofing 
material as the instructions contained 

are of a practical nature. Headers of 

'•Hardware and Metal" should obtain 
a copy, which may be had from The 
Paterson Mfg. Ob. by mentioning this 

paper. 

STEEL FRAME RAILWAY LANTERN. 

I J T. WRIGHT cv CO., Hamilton, 
_^ 4 Ont., are not only extending their 
capacities for production in every 
way, but are constantly introducing to the 
trade new designs which are worthy of 
attention. One of the newest things 
they have brought out is their "No. 
11 Steel Frame Railway Lantern." 
As may be judged from the name, 
and as can be seen from the accom- 
panying photograph, the frame is 
made of steel, 13-gauge. After the 
frame is put together it is dipped 
in tin, thus adding to its attractive- 
ness as well as its strength. The 
top is drawn out in one piece of 
tin, as is also the oil fount, which 
is thus free from seams and from 
the danger of leaking. The good 
qualities of these lamps have so 
appealed to the judgment of the 
large rail way companies that several 
large orders for them have been 
already received. 

Another article recently intro- 
duced by E. T. Wright & Co. is a 
bird-cage supplied with a detach- 
able wire netting. As the netting 
can be readily taken off for clean- 
ing, the appearance of the cage can easily 
be kept attractive. A feature of this cage 
is the rivetting instead of soldering the 
wires throughout, an idea which origin- 
ated with this firm and which has been 
copied extensively by United States manu- 
facturers. 

ARE MAKING EXTENSIONS. 

John E. Edwards & Sons, Bracondale, 
Out., manufacturers of leather goods, 
look forward to adding to their already 
extensive establishment, but on account 
of the high cost of building, together 
with the difficulty in securing labor, 
building operations have been deferred 
for the present. Edwards & Sons em- 
ploy over 7b hands. They manufacture 
In, mess trimmings, leather belts and 
suspenders, school bags, halters, dog col- 
lars, etc., and sell only to the jobbing 
trade. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




? ^\r 



ARl oept. MAcU^tf- 



Hardware und 

Met*] 



TINWARE AND THE TINSHOP 



THE EQUIPMENT OF A MODERN TINSHOP. 



II tying to End that more and 
more attention is being paid to the 
equipment of workshops. Upon the 
convenience of the arrangement, and 

upon the assortment of tools and 
materials, depends in a large degree the 
character and quantity of work turned 
out. Bv tlie increased efficiency secured, 
by attention paid to arrangement 
ami assortment of tools, the employer 
benefits as much as the workman. A 
visit to a well equipped tinsmith shop 
tills with wonder the uninitiated and with 
admiration the practical tinsmith, who 
knows by experience what is required and 
is able to recognize a good arrangement 

when lie sees it. 

'Hie visitor is at once struck with the 
multiplicity of tools which are in use. 
The contrast with the small shop of a 
few years ago with its scanty equipment 
i- very striking. The modern up-to-date 
shop uses oas lire pots entirely, where 
gas 'an lie seined. ;l s they have been 
found to he the most economical. 

A would he useless to attempt a list 
and description of the many tools which 
the modern workshop contains. For the 
sinir] t . operation of eavetroughing quite an 
assortment is required. If it is neces- 
sary to remove old shingles the work- 
man must be equipped with a spike pull- 
er. Straight and circular snips are of 
use here as in so many operations in the 
shop. " A hammer and chisel with solder- 
ing irons, swabs. solder, sal ammoniac 
and fire pot complete the outfit. 

In examining the outfit for the general 
work of the shop the old-time tinsmith 
would probably he bewildered at the mere 
enumeration of the many implements 
with which the experienced workman of 
to-day is so well acquainted. The eye 
is attracted by the grooving machine and 
the hand groovers which are employed on 
the more intricate work. Burring ma- 
chines, large ami small, wiring machines, 
crimping and double seaming machines 
attract the attention of the visitor who 
is interested in machinery. 

A large assortment of hand tools at- 
tracts attention. Hammers and mallets, 
with various kinds of snips, straight 
and circular, are in constant use. Tin 
Folders, and stovepipe folders, soldering 
irons and fire pots, squaring and circular 
-hears are close to the workman's hand. 

Within the limits of a short article it 
would he useless to attempt any enumera- 
tion or description of the many tools 



found accessary in a [arge shop. uoirn; 
would surely be omitted which the prac- 
tical workman would think of great im- 
portance. But almost as much depends 
upon the convenient arrangement of the 
tools with which the workman is provid- 
ed as upon the extent of the assortment 
which he has at his disposal. A well 
understood and orderly arrangement of 
those tools which are most constantly 
wanted is of great importance. The ac- 
companying cut taken from a number of 
The Metal Worker will illustrate an ar- 
rangement which, with various modifica- 
tions to suit the needs of particular 
shops, has been found very useful. 

The windows at the back of the bench 
are a few inches higher than the top of 
the bench. The space between the win- 




dows is wainscotted and is utilized for 
keeping tools and supplies handy to the 
workman. 

In the upper space, but within easy 
reach, is hung a set of rivet boxes, which 
may be made in various sizes. A con- 
venient box seen by the writer in a well- 
equipped Toronto shop was about 2^-in. 
deep, fi -in. long and Tin. wide. Half 
of the front was covered to prevent the 
rivets from falling out when the box is 
bung upon the wall. At the same time 
a convenient opening is provided for the 
hand when the box is lying on its back 
on the bench, ready for use. On the 
outside of the box should be soldered a 
sample of the rivet contained within, or, 
if this is not convenient, the size and 
description might be marked on the out- 
side with black paint. 

Below the rivet boxes are nails or hooks 
holding the ever useful hand snips of the 

28 



regular kind, a pair of hand snips with 
circular blades, intended for cutting round 
holes in sheet metal, and a pair of spec- 
ial snips for cutting a section of tin or 
sheet iron in two parts in the middle. 

Here may also be hung the cutting 
pliers, Hat nosed pliers and round nosed 
pliers which the tinsmith finds indispen- 
sable. Hooks might also be provided 
for the riveting hammer and the peen 
hammer. 

Below these again are placed racks 
made of sheet iron and used for holding 
a set of punches, rivet sets, and hand 
groovers ; also screw drivers, scribers, 
scrapers and other tools which the tin- 
smith finds convenient for his work. 

The great advantage of some such ar- 
rangement is that the workman has 
ready to hand those tools which he con- 
stantly requires. Practical experience 
may suggest others than those mention- 
ed, but the plan here submitted may be 
modified to suit the condition of any 
shop. The tools most constantly re- 
quired should be arranged in some such 
manner. No time need then be lost in 
looking for tools, for every tool has its 
place. Much well-paid time is lost in 
this way— a minute now and a minute 
again amounting to a great deal in the 
aggregate. 

It is a custom in many well-ordered 
shops to have every workman put away 
all his tools in their proper places at the 
conclusion of each day's work. The ar- 
rangement shown in the cut will provide 
for most of the tools in ordinary use, 
but all others should be placed in draw- 
ers, leaving the bench entirely clear. 
When this is done a boy can sweep it 
clean every morning and have everything 
in proper order before the day's work is 
begun. 

CHAMBERLIN METAL WEATHER 
STRIP. 

We give herewith extracts from a book- 
let descriptive of a device which has 
proved exceedingly popular in the United 
States. 

The Chamberlin Metal Weather Strip is 
made of zinc. It has no rubber, no felt, 
no wood ; it is invisible and indestruct- 
ible. It is by far the cheapest method 
used to make window sashes weather- 
tight. The strip is applied with equal 
effectiveness to new or old windows. It 
positively excludes drafts, dust, and soot, 
rattling windows are an impossibility ; 
street noises are greatly lessened. 

All of which " Hardware and Metal", 
from past knowledge of the device, and 
persuaded by the testimony of known 
users of this weather strip, is ready to 
believe. Since the strip is difficult to 
describe intelligently without cuts we 
advise our readers to send to The Cham- 
berlin Metal Weather Strip Co., Ltd., 
Kingsville. Ont., for their illustrated 
booklet. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE KITCHEN UTENSILS OF THE FILIPINOS. 



IN order t<> realize the comfort* which 
civilization lias provided the Canatl 
inn householder of to-day one need 
not simlv the past for comparisons. I In 
illustrations below, from an issue of 'iho 
American Kitchen Magazine, show tin' 
modern (?) appliances used in the ord'.n 
nry Filipino household. 

In the accompanying sketches, Pig. I 
shows the common mode employed bj the 
average housewife of the poorer native. 
A couple of stones are colled together ou 
the ground just outside the house, and 

the little lines look about for some Inls 
Of wood, while the mother mixes the df.h 

to be cooked, which is rice, as a rule. 
Then a stone or home made pottery jar is 

placed where the heat of the lire will 

reach it. and thus the cooking is douo. 



being eut for the purpose. Brick chiin 

neys an- not yet in \ Og Ue I hi l> I"' 

oi oven is also used in the bakoric 

t he ( Ihinese in tie' i l > . who do 

of the cooking, ties,- foreigners ueiug 
more enterprising than tie- Datives, • * a 
rule. 

I observed in man) houses an arra 
nieiit like (hat shown in Fig, I In 

of using stones outside on tie- ground, or 

cutting a hole in tl arth, the native 

builds a rack of heavj timbers in his 
kitchen, and on lop of this rack places 
layers of white sand from the beaches, to 

protect the wood from the heat of the 

I'm-. Thus the housewife has the liru 
place elevated to a convenient level. The 

lire is made in the centre and the cooking 

utensils placed on the burning 

Often there is no provision made for the 




»l (lit- Ponrrr Sail 





Fig ft. — Out- Fot <n of Dipper 
or Ladle Csr>l t, v the No- 



Fig 4 —Form of Cooking Apparatus Deed In Somt 
Inalancee. 



Fi</ -' - tnvlhii thlhod ol Cooking. 




~^W 



Fig. 1. — Cup or Bailing Device. 



Fig 6 —Home Made Fork 



Fig. 9.— Device tor Sprinkling Water. 




Fig. 3.—HI0H, ur Brick Own tor Vnng Wood 
or Charcoal. 



Fig b —Small Set o/ Scales. 



A Few Filipino Kitchen Utensils. 



In some cases the natives are supplied 

with metal howls and kettles, but most 

of them have only the domestic kinds 
made from clay. Sometimes the lire is 
built in a hole made in the ground, as 
in I r io . 2, and a pole is stretched over 
the opening to which is swung the kettle. 
In the great convent buildings which 
wen- erected by the Spaniards in their 
days of prosperity, and also in many of 
the kitchens of the rich natives, instead 
of iron stoves being used, brick or stouo 
ovens were erected on the plan presented 
in Fig. 3. These ovens are used with 
good results, although they smoke and 
consume considerable fuel. Wood and 
charcoal are burned. The brick ovens 

are built in one end of a room and the 
smoke stack carries the smoke out 
through the side of the house, a llolc 



smoke and it penetrates everything be- 
fore it passes out through the sides of 
the light bamboo structure. 

Fig. •") represents one of the dippers us- 
ed by the natives. It is made of a 
COCOanut hollowed and cleaned, and fixed 
to the end of a stick that serves for a 
handle. Fig. (> shows the kind of home 
made fork or stirring too! they use. It 

is a piece of bamboo split at one of the 
ends. Fig, 7 is another cup or bailing 
device used to take liquids from a vessel. 

'The natives use the bamboo to hold 
liquids, anil this- being narrow at the 
opening, the form of dipper in Fig. 7, 
which is made of bamboo with a wood 
handle, serves the desired purpose. Fig. 
8 is a small set of scales. Two littl'j 
tubes of wood are suspended to the lever. 
and the lever is balanced on the upright 
stick, which is set into a baseboard, as 

2!) 



show n. I lni . the wi-IL'lllli 

i a ii be d< me by ha v in" I he propel 

on one side to balance tie 

..ill, I 

THE CARE OF TINSMITHS' TOOLS 
"Are tinsmith* a careful of t Inn tool 

as the) should be." asked "Hardware 

ami Metal" of u large manufactures*. 

"Decidedly no," came tin- answer with 

einpli "If tie- average tinsmith kepi 

in a convenient place an od can and a 

good wrench and made propei u-e of 

them he would not have half tin- trouble 

with his tools and they would last 

( tften w hen on nto a tin 

shop there is no oil can to be had and 

there is a big hunt to get the wrench." 

"W hat is t he need for t Inin ?" 

"They an- led everywhere. Take 

for instance tin- squaring slii-ai - Utei 
each box i- cut the operator should take 

ii swiib anil go over the knives, top and 
bottom. In one shop I know of 500,000 
cans were cut on ii .'il in. squaring 
shear*, without having to be sharpened 
or repaired and without showing burring 
on tin- knife edges ;it the finish. The 

secret was simply that the sheiii s were 

caiefidlv oiled after each box was cut." 
"What effect has the od ? Why should 

it be used '.'" 

"It ii is not used the constant cutting 
creates friction, drying up the blades, 

winch are thus attracted to each other; 
then the action of the too dry metal 
against each other takes off the edge. 
I'hc oil prevents this becoming dry and 

thus makes them work smoothly and 
preserves their edge. The number of 

shears, both foot and hand power, which 
come to us for repairs because of lack 
of attention, would surprise you." 

"Do other tools suffer Iii the same 
way '.'" 

"Possibly in equal degree, but not in 
the same way. Too many tinsmiths do 
not use spike pullers enough, Instead of 

them they often Use the snips, or even the 

cutting nippers. The nippers are, bj the 
way, the most abused article we make. 

Notice the construction of this one 

the great leverage, due to the short dis- 
tance to the cuttin and the great 
length <>f the arms. Wire should always 
be cut on one side or another, vet tinn 
ers will persist in Sticking the ends of 
the wire in at the middle of the blades. 
Now. ii- vou can si-.-, the construction of 
the nipper is such that when wire is 
stuck in here and the nipper- are - 
on it the end of the win- generally rest- 
on the base of the hinge. Close examin- 
ation will show you that as tin- nippers 
close the wire is pushed upwards from 
below and as the nippers, having ipped 
it. prevent it from moving upv 
result is that either the wire must be 
contracted, or some part of thi 

breaks. It is too much to ask even such 
a good Strong tool as this to cut 
-..ft wire under the circumstances. 'I he 
wonder i- that they do not always break 
under such a - ' rain." 






Hhnlwor*' and 
Met-1 



Window and Interior Displays 



Timely Hints 
and Suggestions. 



FOR the display of stoves in a win- 
dow, a specially constructed 
window is necessary. For this 
reason there are few hardware 
stores that make an attempt to 
have them as part of a window display. 
Many consider the effect of a stove window 
as rather coarse, and injurious to the 
appearance of the other trim. In this there 
is much of truth, but whether the injury to 
the other window or the benefit of a good 
stove window is the greater is a debatable 
question. 

There is a decided difficulty in arranginga 
stove window so that it will attract the eye 
and please it, when the eye is drawn. In 
the first place, stoves are such staple articles 
that a passer-by is apt to pay no attention 
to them, and in the second place the win- 
dow must of necessity be built so low that 
it appears as a part of the store interior, 
rather than as a window display. For this 
reason an especially attractive stove must 
hold the central position, one that has 
much nickel work on it, and a great deal of 
fancy designing. This may not be the 
stove that sells, but it is the stove that will 
attract attention to the window and thus 
to the other stoves or articles in the 
window. 

Staple lines of stoves are of no interest as 
even a part of the trim, because the public 
is well aware that they are in stock. Such 
lines as parlor stoves, gas ranges, coal oil 
lamps and small office heaters are the kinds 
that set people thinking, as these are the 
lines that are apt to be forgotten by a 
householder, or are lines in which he is not 
thoroughly versed. 

A very fine window can be filled with gas 
ranges and heaters of different kinds, with 
perhaps some reference on a window card 
to their usefulness in hot weather, or for 
rapid cooking. There are various styles of 
these which are new to any observer, and 
their very novelty will catch the eye. . 

Another window that takes is one made 
up of coal oil burners of different sizes and 
makes, with price tickets as a part of the 
display. There are hundreds of people who 
never think of the advantages of these 
small cheap heaters unless they are made to, 
by an exhibit of this kind. 

When a conspicuous stove is used there 
should not be much else in the window, a 
coal oil stove or two and some cooking 
utensils making up sufficient display. A 
very good window that is easily made up 
and will prove a seller is one where a bright 
stove holds the centre, while over it from 
side to 6ide extends a wooden arch, to 
which are attached various cooking uten- 



sils such as pots, granite kettles and pans, 
trying pans, etc , or a collection of tinware. 
In the construction of a window suitable 
for stoves the particular requirements to 
observe are the height, the strength and the 
substantial, plain appearance. In height 
it shoul f only be a few inches, for conveni- 
ence and for appearance, as a stove up in a 
high window looks rather ridiculous Many 
stores adopt a plan which is, perhaps, the 



A Window Display Competition. » 

» 

HARDWARE and Metal, forthe encour- 
agement of tasty window displays, has 
decided to open a competition for its sub- 
scribers. Prizes will be awarded for photos 
♦ or drawings of window di-plays and accom- 
4i panying descriptions of the same. The 
^p prizes will consist of: 

jj First Prize - $10 

^ Second Prize - - $7 

4b THird Prize - $5 



> 

> 

> 
> 

i 

i 

> 
i 
> 
► 



» 



and $2 for every picture and description 
which is considered worthy of publicati >n. 
The competition, which closes on Sept. 1, 
will admit of photographs, pen and ink or 
wash drawings, with good ideas counting 
more than the picture itself, although, of 
course, all pictures in order to receive a 
prize, must be of sufficient distinctness and 
good workmanship to admit of their pub- 
lication. 

There is no progressive merchant but has 
at least one window a month that is worthy ^ 
of entering this competition, and the prizes i? 
are so arranged that, even if a window does 3 
not win the §10, $1 or $5 prize, it may be 
awarded a $2 prize, provided only that it is 
of sufficient merit to publish in the columns 
of this paper. This award will cover the 
cost of the photograph and there is no reason 
why any merchant should not obtain it. 
The number of photographs or drawings 
submitted by each store is not limited, nor 
P is the number r f $2 prizes ; a merchant may 
2? win a dozen if his pictures merit them. 
2? Should any intending competitor not know 
JX how to take a window picture, this paper 
2? will be glad to furnish him with instructions. 
2? In general terms, it may be stated that the 
2f early morning, when the light is clear, when 
2? few people are abroad and when there is the 
2, least r.-flection, is the best time to photo- 
2? graph the display. A good photograph can 
2? also be taken at night by the aid of an 
J; electric or flash light. 

8 Mark all manuscripts and photographs 
intended for this department with the words 
^ "Window Dressing Competition." 



best : the floor of the interior is the floor of 
the window, either without any dividing 
line or with a mere moulding. The use of 
moulding aljows the use of the window for 
the display of any heavy goods in addition 
to stoves, as it marks off the necessary 
division from the interior. 

No trimmings of any kind should form 
part of the window for stoves. Plain walls, 
glass frames and floors should be used, as 
the utilitarian idea embodied in such wares 

30 



does not allow of any decorative ideas in 
connection with it. A plain, oiled hard- 
wood floor of narrow boards is preferable 
to any other kind, and has the advantage 
of not showing scratches. 

In the interior very many stores show 
stoves only at the back or in a separate 
room. This is often rendered necessary by 
the amount of stock which a hardware 
merchant is forced to carry and which fills 
up all the front of the store. A separate 
room is a good plan if it is permissible, 
otherwise a section of the back of the store 
where there is a window will prove a desir- 
able location for the stove stock or at least 
for a sample line. If the front of a store ad- 
mits of it, however, the best position for 
stoves is in a row down one side of the 
store, with the window devoted to their 
display or that of other heavy goods in 
front of it and level with the store floor. 
Behind the row on shelves can then be 
placed the cooking utensils and tinware, 
and the other side of the building devoted 
to the other lines of a hardware stock. 

This prominent display of the stove 
stock will be found many times to sell a 
stove. A customer while being waited 
upon will naturally look around a store, 
and there is always something interesting 
in a stove for the man or woman who has 
a house. If the stoves are kept clean and 
the floor and shelves in good condition re- 
garding paint and dust, this side of the 
store can be made a valuable addition to 
the interior appearance. 



Fly Time and the Show Window. 

Pretty soon the fly will be putting in 
bis appearance in droves and figure in the 
window man's troubles. We know ol 
nothing more aggravating than putting 
in a nice window and on going out on the 
sidewalk finding a lot of blue-bottles orna- 
menting the space called the extreme front. 
It can be avoided. After you get your 
window thoroughly cleared out and ready 
forthe trim, heat a large saucer over a 
lamp ; place it in the centre of the window 
and pour on it a few drops of strong am- 
monia. Leave your door open and in ten 
minutes there will not be a fly left in the 
window. Furthermore, they will not re- 
turn for some time. Another way to get 
rid of these beauty destroyers is to paint 
all around the outside of your door with 
coal oil or kerosene. Hither way is a con- 
siderable improvement over sheets of fly 
paper strewed about. 



* 



HARDWARE AND MET. 



rip. 



> 




■• 



^ 







MALLEABLE 
CROSSES 





We keep 
VALVES 



and 



FITTINGS. 



-> 



MALLEABLE 
TEES 





UNIONS 



COUPLINGS "^> 




JENKINS 
96 

PACKING. 



ELBOWS 



JENKINS 
DISCS. 







CAPS 





BROWN'S PIPE TONGS 



PLUGS 



BUSHINGS 




MILL and RAILWAY SUPPLIES 

Jh 



y Jt3 

3 a 



^ 



1 



L 



LOCK NUTS 

WRITE FOR 
QUOTATIONS. 

'QUICK ACTION" 
MAIL ORDER 
DEPARTMENT. 




REDUCERS 



STILLSON'S PIPE WRENCHES 



CaverMl, Learmont & Go. 

SALESROOMS: WAREHOUSE: 

ST. PETER ST. COLBORNE & ANN STS. 

MONTREAL 



31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



FARfl BELLS 




The test of value of an article of this kind is not 
its first cost, but satisfactory tone and durability. 
The metal we use in the manufacture of our Farm 
Bells will give you a richer, sweeter and further- 
reaching tone than any other make will do. They 
are cheaper than any other, because a better quality 
at equal price, and our style of finish and the way 
we pack them is also to your advantage. Don't 
fail to order our make. 



Manufactured by. 



TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited, GUELPH 

AT THE LARGEST AND BEST EQUIPPED HARDWARE FACTORY IN CANADA. 
SOLD ONLY THROUGH THE JOBBING TRADE. 



ARE YOU ONE OF THEM ? 

Hardware Dealers All Over the Dominion 
Are Making Money Handling Our Lines. 

If you are not you are neglecting a fruitful source 
(ifipf of income which can easily be yours. 

^ DODGE WOOD SPLIT PULLEYS offer an ex- 

cellent profit. The flexibility of the line allows a 
small stock to meet many requirements. 

Then there is our line of shafting — no better made 
anywhere — and there is a continual call for this class 
of goods once you let the manufacturing plants in 
your neighborhood know about them. 

Write to us to day and we'll tell you how little you 
will have to invest to carry both these stocks and 
make the money that is rightfully yours. 



fsi 1 *'* 



Igl Ife. Co. 01 

TORONTO, ONT. 



:vi 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President I 

JOHN BAYNS MACLEAN, 

Montreal, 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES, 



Montreal 



Toronto 

London, Eng. 
Manchester, Eng. 

London, Ont. 

St. John, N.B. - 



232 McGill Street. 
Telephone 1255. 
10 Front Street East. 
Telephones 2701 and 2702. 
100 Fleet Street, E.C. 
18 St. Ann Street. 
H. S. Ashburner. 
Hiscox Building. 
Walter H. Lindsay. 
No. 3 Market Wharf. 
J. Hunter White. 
NEW York - Room 1341 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Winnipeg, Man. - 377 Cumberland Ave. 

D. J. Benham. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, (2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address I ^script, London. 



THE ALIEN LABOR BILL ADOPTED. 

SENATOR LOUGHEED'S bill to pre- 
vent the interference of foreign labor 
agitators in Canadian labor affairs, re- 
ceived its final reading in the Senate on 
Wednesday. It was carried by a large 
majority of votes. 

The measure is a drastic one, but it 
must be remembered that a drastic remedy 
is needed. Many of the strikes which have 
taken place in Canada during the last few 
years have been directly traceable to labor 
agitators from the United States. 

It is alleged, and with more than a mere 
semblance ot truth, that in some instances 
the strikes have been brought about more 
with the desire to injure Canadian indus- 
tries than to benefit the strikers. All the 
allegations in regard to this point have 
not emanated from employers of labor. 
We have concurrent evidence from some 
of the organized labor bodies. We refer 
to the circular which the labor unions 
which seceded from the International 
Trades and Labor Congress issued, in 
which it was asserted that they were in- 
duced to take the step they did because of 
the interference of foreign labor agitators 



EDITORIAL 

to the obvious injury of Canadian indus- 
ii ies. 

Senator Lougheed's bill has, of course, 
yel in come before the House of com- 
mons. Whether it will pas-, that body or 
not remains to be seen. Judging from 
the experience of the past, ii is improbable 
thai it will, but whether it does or not, 
the bill which has just passed the Senate 
has no doubt done good in thai it lias 
called the attention of the publii in a 
forceful manner to what is obviously an 
evil. 

Against organized labor no one can 
justly take a stand. In every phase of 
industrial life organizations have become 
more or less a necessity, but when organ- 
ized labor or organized bodies of any kind 
are being used by foreigners to cripple in- 
dustrial life in this country, it is time that 
steps were taken, even if thev are some- 
times drastic, toward controlling their 
actions. 



CANADA AND PREFERENTIAL 
TRADE. 

DESPATCHES from London on Thurs- 
day refer to two important state- 
ments regarding the preferential trade 
campaign now being fought out in Great 
Britain. One of them states that in reply 
to a question in the House of Commons, 
Hon. Joseph Chamberlain stated that "no 
member of the Government had suggested 
a tax on raw materials." The despatch 
adds: "This narrows the possible opera- 
tion of a preference to food products, and 
to that extent lessens the importance of 
the proposals from the standpoint of Aus- 
tralia, New Zealand and South Africa, 
who send Great Britain a comparatively 
small proportion of food supplies, but a 
good proportion of wool and other raw 
materials." 

The other despatch reports an interview 
with Mr. J. F. Ellis, president of the To- 
ronto Board of Trade, in The London 
Daily Chronicle, who expressed himself as 
follows : 

Canada is just looking on. The Dominion doe> 
not want the Mother Country to place heiself at a 
disadvantage for the sake of Canada. It looks too 
much like begging to meet with the approval cf 
Canadians generally. Canadians can stand upon 
33 



Hardware and 



thru owe bet, but would naturally welcome any 
advantageous scheme of commercial or fiscal union. 
For the British manufacturer then- is no po 
'h. it the Dominion will ever admit English 
goods free, owing to the n<- 

well as to the determination of Canadians to build 
up a great industrial country. 

Mr. Ellis expresses tersely what is a 
steadily growing sentiment in this > ountry, 

a sentiment which will be emphasized by 

the announcement that Australian raw 
materials would not receive the preference 

proposed for food products. 

Canadian business men are too indepen- 
dent to expect, and too shrewd lo exp& 1, 
that Great Britain will give Canada an 
advantage in her markets, to her own dis- 
advantage, for the mere reason that sui Ii 
action would tend to build up the Kmpire 
over seas - in Canada. 

A compensating advantage will natur- 
ally be sought in the Canadian market. 
Undoubtedly there are classes in Canada 
who would like to see the tariff on British 
goods reduced to a lower level than at 
present, if not wipe it out altogether. But 
a large proportion of the Canadian people 
take an entirelv different view of the situa- 
tion. With the business men of Canada 

as with the business men of Great Britain 
— consideration of the matter will not be 
guided by sentiment. A cold, hard-headed 
adjustment of the matter on a business 
basis will be insisted upon. When Cana- 
dian manufacturers are asked to forego 
the present protection on goods made by 
them in order to give the British manufac- 
turer an advantage over other countries, 
Imperial sentimentalities will not carry 
much weight. 

The Canadian Minister of Finance, Hon. 
Mr. Fielding, recognized this fact in his 
speech on the budget, when he declared 
that any preference in the Canadian mar- 
ket to Great Britain would rot be at the 
expense of Canadian manufacturers but 
rather of foreign competitors, and had so 
notified the Imperial authorities. 

Canada does not want any favor for 
nothing from Great Britain, but, as Mr. 
Ellis said, this country has determined 
" to build up a great industrial country" 
and is not likely to drop the bone of pre- 
sent prosperity to grasp for the shadow of 
Imperial greatness. 



H « t " i t w r *» and 

Mrt.l 



EDITORIAL 



THE CRUX OF MUNICIPAL REFORM. 



IN interesting themselves in the move- 
ment lor municipal reform the Cana- 
dian Manufacturers'Association have taken 
.i wise course. Aside altogether from the 
public welfare which K' ,l,J municipal 
government entails, there are their own 
interests to protect. 

Where inefficiency exists the manufac- 
turing interests of the community must 
ssarilj suffer, either directly or indi- 
rectly. Consequently, self-interest alone 
should be a sufficiently strong incentive to 
induce not only manufacturers, but busi- 
ness men in general, either organized or 
unorganized, to lend their active aid to 
the movement tor better municipal govern- 
ment. 

The government of a city, town or 
village is something more than the distri- 
bution oi perquisites and public funds 
among the friends o( aldermen and coun- 
cillors, notwithstanding that the facts 
sometimes appear to successfully dispute 
this theory. The government of a muni- 
cipalit) oi any kind is really a business 
matter, and in its conduct should be 
characterized by the same executive 
ability that is peculiar to the manage- 
ment of a factory, warehouse or store. 
Because this quality is more marked by 
its absence than by its presence, the prin- 
ciple is none the less true. We have not 
the desideratum, because the influence of 
the business men of the community, and 
particularly in the large cities, has no 
potent force. Secret society and party 
influence-, are the factors most potent. 
And one can no more breed business ad- 
ministrations from elements of this kind 
than one can make pumpkins from pota- 
to,.-. Like begets like. 

At the banquet of the Canadian Manu- 
facturers Association in Toronto the other 
night, Professor Goldwin Smith asserted 
that reform lay in the direction of separat- 
ing the administrative and legislative 
branches of the municipal system of gov- 
ernment. We are confident that the ven- 
erable professor struck the right key. The 
owners of large commercial enterprises 
appoint expels to the management of 
their several departments. This is what 
sliould be done in regard to municipal 



affairs, and this is what we shall eventually 
he compelled to do. 

The system under which we work to-day 
in large cities like Montreal and Toronto 
is more adapted to the village system of 
self-government which obtained several 
centuries ago in l neat Britain than to the 
conditions as the\ exist to-dav. Conse- 
quently, our necessities and our system of 
municipal government have become as far 
separaled as the poles. The result is the 
present inefficiency and maladministration. 
And now, when business men are required 
most in the administration of municipal 
affairs, they are the more difficult to 
obtain, simply because their business, de- 
manding increasingly closer attention, 
does not permit them to give their time to 
the details of civic administration. As a 
result, our affairs have fallen into ineffici- 
ent and, only too often, into evil hands. 

When the duties of civic administration 
are delegated to experts, the chief obstacle 
to the participation of business men in 
legislative affairs of the municipality will 
be removed and the results will no doubt 
be soon apparent in the personnel of our 
civic bodies. 

The members of the Canadian Manufac- 
turers' Association have set themselves to 
the task of bringing these desired reforms 
about. They are to be commended, and 
it is to be hoped they will enlist the sym- 
pathetic and practical co-operation of busi- 
ness men, organized as well as unorgan- 
ized, throughout the country. 



MAKING INVESTIGATIONS. 

ANL'MBER of the representatives of 
English Chambers of Commerce, 
who are to attend the convention in Mont- 
real next month, have arrived a couple of 
weeks beforehand in order to study trade 
conditions and business methods in Can- 
ada. They have paid visits to some of 
the wholesale hardware houses, and ex- 
hibited much interest in the methods of 
packing goods, particularly where the 
American goods were concerned. The 
neat, tasteful manner in which the latter 
were put up attracted their very favorable 
comment, and a change will likely follow 
in the packing of goods in several English 
34 



houses whose representatives thus made 
observations on some things American. 

All this was with a view to improve 
trade relations between Great Britain and 
Canada. The visitors are bound not to 
give the American manufacturers the 
slightest advantage over them in this 
market, and the more attractive American 
packages have long been a source of bene- 
fit to United States exporters and of dis- 
advantage to exporters from the Old 
Country. This difference between Eng- 
lish and American packages is not so 
pronounced either in the hardware trade 
as in groceries and other lines, where 
superior packing and labelling have greatly 
increased the sales of American goods in 
Canada. But even in the hardware there 
is a difference in favor of the Americans, 
and it is gratifying to find some English 
exporters of hardware lines preparing to 
give our southern neighbors a " run for 
their money." It is only in the packages 
that the English exporters need to make 
improvements ; the contents of their pack- 
ages compare most favorably with any- 
thing we import. 



RECORD DEMAND FOR HEATING 
GOODS t 

AN examination of the conditions affect- 
ing the stove, range and furnace 
trade of Canada serves to emphasize in a 
striking manner the buoyant condition of 
affairs throughout the Dominion. 

No industry responds more readily to 
conditions of depression or of prosperity. 
The past three or four years has witnessed 
an expansion in the demand for heating 
goods that would have been deemed im- 
possible a few years ago. The result has 
been the erection of new foundries and the 
material enlargement of foundries in every 
part of the country. Yet the demand 
seems to keep full pace with the increased 
supply. Many foundries report an in- 
ability to fill their orders and prophesy 
that such conditions must exist to the end 
of the season just about to open. 

Retailers throughout the country would 
do well to make a note of these facts early 
in the season. Prices of heating goods 
now in stock should be well maintained 
and »hen the new season's goods start to 
move care should be taken in every case 
to get full prices for them. 



EDITORIAL 



Hinlwirn >nd 

Mot. I 



ANDREW CARNEGIE'S OPINION OF CANADA. 



IT is not probable- that the opinion of 
Canada held by main people will be 
affected by any utterances bj Andrew 

Carnegie regarding this country. \ el 
when The Ironmonger published on Maj 
9 an interview with him, in which lie 
spoke in contemptuous terms of Canada's 
future, the criticisms were so general and 
bitter that Mr. Carnegie wrote to The 
Toronto Globe, stating that when he was 
so reported the interviewer had distorted 
his views and so published them, despite 
a pledge to show the manuscript to him 
before publication. 

The inference given in the letter and 
accepted by all readers, in Canada at least, 
was that Mr. Carnegie referred to The 
Ironmonger interview in his denial. In 
last week's issue was published a summary 
of the interview, Mr. Carnegie's denial 
and the reply thereto by The Ironmonger 
in the issue of June 4. 

Now there is to hand the June 11 issue 
of The Ironmonger, in which is a letter 
from Mr. Carnegie to that paper in which 
is the following : 

"A friend wires me that from remarks in The 
Ironmonger you must have thought yourself the 
party referred to in my note to The Toronto Globe. 
I can scarcely believe this, since the circumstances 
were so entirely different. You were not that man. 
Nothing you did was otherwise than pleasing. * 

* * Very sorry if any ambiguity on my part 
caused you to believe you were the guilty party 
when, on the contrary, you were entirely innocent 
of any cause for dissatisfaction." 

Mr. Carnegie does not, however, en- 
lighten us as to who the " guilty party " 
is. So the matter rests where it was be- 
fore the publication of the Globe letter. 
We must sorrowfully accept The Iron- 
monger interview as Mr. Carnegie's opin- 
ion of Canada — much as it hurts our 
national vanity. 

We must confess, however, that we are 
not dismayed because the iron magnate 
has expressed the opinion that Canada's 
steel industry is "a figment " and Cape 
Breton is "a mirage," and that, conse- 
quently, " Canada has no future except as 
part of the United States." 

Andrew Carnegie seems to be a small 
man, despite his acquisitive abilities. His 
life has been so identified with iron and 
steel that he has become permeated with 
the idea that lack of a great steel indus- 



try is a vital hindrance to national ad- 
vancement, not realizing that Canada has, 
notwithstanding her l.u k oi billion-dollai 
steel trusts, grown in the past five years 

as no Othei COUntrj in the world lias. 

Canada's internal trade has developed 

in a manner thai has surprised even the 

mosl optimistic of her merchants and 

manufacturers. In ten years her foreign 
trade has grown from $247,638,000 to 

$467,637, , >>i practicall) doubled, now- 
being almost :><) per cent, greater than was 
that of the United Stales in L 850, when 

that country had a population o( almost 
25,000*000. Other comparisons could be 

made, but we desist foi fear our friend, 
Mr. Carnegie, may feel that "comparisons 
are odious. " 



PROFIT-SHARING EXPERIMENT. 

NTR. R. A. BARTLEY, a wholesale 
JL merchant of Toledo, Ohio, has de- 
cided to take his employes into partnership 

on a profit-sharing basis. The employes 
will in addition to their regulai salary re- 
ceive a share of the profits of the business 
so long as they remain with the firm. 

The profit-sharing system, as a remedy 
for the admitted defects of the wages 
system, has received considerable attention 
of late and no end of comment pro and 
con. The most conspicuous example of 
successful profit-sharing was that of 
Leclair, the celebrated Parisian decorator, 
who in the middle of last century con- 
ceived and carried out the scheme of shar- 
ing the profits of his business with his 
workmen. In a short time through the 
improved care and workmanship of his 
men, who were now financially interested 
beyond their day's pay, he secured com- 
plete control of the Parisian trade. Al- 
though the master mind has long since 
passed away the linn is still in existence 
and successful operation. 

In the wake of Leclair's enterprise, 
various profit-sharing plans have been 
spasmodically adopted, but the mi..^- 
which has followed these experiments has 
not been such as to warrant am general 
rules being laid down. The cases of fail- 
ure are about as numerous as those of 
success. 

On the other hand, from an examina- 
35 



lion ol rei oided experiments in prolil-sli.u 
ing, it will be found thai where the work- 
men are of the average degree <>i intelli- 
gence, where the) an- thrown largely upon 
theii own responsibility and where the 
nature of the work is such as to admit of 
.mi appreciable degree of saving or waste 

Oil the part of an employe, thai the adop- 
tion of a scheme i<f profit-sharing has 
usually been successful. In the United 
States 1 1 has been found to work well in 

soap factories, and in Canada The Win. 

Davies Pork Packing Co. have for some 

had a scheme of profit-sharing 

which has been found lo work ver) satis- 
factorily. 



THE AGAMOMERIS CULICIS 

HAIL to the Agamomeris Culicis ! At 
last he has been discovered, and 
promises to relieve a sweltering world 
from the noisome pest which fallens 
on our luscious red corpuscles, and, in 
grate! injects in return the deadly malaria 
microbe. 

Tin- Agamomeris c'ulicis, as everyone 
knows, is not a new claimant for th. 
vian throne, but an able-bodied, hard- 
working parasite which preys upon the 
ubiquitous and enterprising scourge o\ 
these Summer evenings, the Jersey mos- 
quito. 

Science has devised various schemes for 

circumventing the wily mosquito and com- 
passing his death. A year or two ago 
petroleum spread over their breeding 
places was announced as a sovereign 
remedy. Hut the ingenious insects used 
the stuff to lubricate their wings, and the 
century biting record was lowered in no 
time. It has even been hinted that The 
Standard Oil Co. launched the oil remedy 
in order to unload an overstocked market. 
l!ul as to the Agamomeris C'ulicis there 
can be no reasonable doubt. Dr. Charles 
Wardell Stiles, of the I'. S. Public Health 

and Marine Hospital Service, is his spon- 
sor, and warrants his protege to be of un- 
impeachable lineage. He comes of a 
fighting race, moreover, and can he 
counted upon to kill millions of mosquitos 
each year. 

It is proposed lo encourage the Aga- 
momeris C'ulicis by means of artificial 
propagation for a few years, at the end of 
which time it is hoped he will 1' 
hold against all competitors. V^i I 
even a parasite has to meet non-union 
competition; As sung by the poet : 
Big bugs have little bugs 
Upon their backs to bite 'em. 
Little bugs have lesser bugs, 
And so ad infinitum. 



H»rdw»r« and 
Metal 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Montreal, July 24, 1903. 
HARDWARE. 
' I g been but slight change in 

hardware markets shut our report 
the conditions prevailing in the 
of last week. Trade is still active among 
manufacturers and jobbers, though the 
latter find business in Eastern Canada 
much l.-^s satisfactory than that with 
the West. The movement in Fall goods 
i~ commencing, and such lines as Ian 
terns, eleighbells, skates, saws and axes 
are in fair demand. \n advance has been 
made in the price of Hamilton rifles ; 
No. 15 is now quoted at $1.50, and No. 
19, at 81.85, net prices. Sales of arms 
and ammunition arc ahead of those last 
year, and some dealers are quoting lower 
prices on double-barreled guns. Shot is 
lower, the discount being now 17.;, per 
cent., instead of 15 per cent. 'The dis- 
count on lead pipe is also changed, and 
is now .'!.") per cent. All the manufac- 
turers ari' now Belling to jobbers under 

the new terms of (lit days net. or 30 days 

less 2 per cent. 

BARB WIRE.— This has improved some- 
what this week, but the movement is 
still slow. The price is *2.b0 per 100 lb. 
f.o.h. Montreal, and $2.55 f.o.b. Cleve 

land. ('allots of 15 tons. $2:45 f.o.h. 
Cleveland. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— There is little 
doing, and no change whatever is re- 
ported in prices. We quote as follows : 

\o, :,. |3.70 ; No. C). 7 and 8, $3.15 ; No. 

9 $2.55 ; No. 10, 13.20 ; No. 11, S3.25 ; 
\o. 12, $2. 65 ; No. L3, *2.75 ; No. 14, 
$3.75. In carlots, f.o.h. Cleveland : No. 
:>. .<2.2o ; Nos. 0, 7..s and 0. 12.15 ; No. 
in. $2.20; No. II. $2.25 ; No. 12. 82.30; 
No. 13, S2.HI; No. II. $2.50. In less than 
carlots," I2.V. per 100 It), extra is charged. 

GALVANIZED WIRE.— There is little 
doing, and no change whatever is report- 
ed in prices. We quote as follows : 
No. o. $3.70 ; No. (i, 7 and 8, 83.15 ; No. 

9, $2.55 : No. 10, $3.20 ; No. n. s:;,25 ; 
No. 12. $2.65 ; No. I-''.. $2.75 ; No. 14, 
$3.75. In carlots. f.o.b. Cleveland : No. 
5. $2.20 • No~. 6, 7, 8 and 9, 82.15 ; No. 

10, $2.20 ; No. II, $2.25; No. 12, $2.30 ; 
No. 13, $2. 10 : No. I 1. $2.50. In less 
than carlots. 12$C per Hill II). extra is 
charged. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE. -The market 
for this wire remains quiet. A small 
business i- doing on the following basis : 
Bright and annealed. $2.50 per L00 tt». 
f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto. Halifax, Lon- 
don, Hamilton and Si. John. Net ex- 
tras per Mm lb. are now as follows : 
Coppered wire, 60c ; timed wire. $2; 

oiling, 10c. : spring wire, $1.25;' best 

steel wiie. 75c: bright -oft drawn. 15c. ; 
ial hay baling wire. 30c. 
PINE STEEL WIRE. The demand for 
fine steel wire has not improved, and 
trade continues quiet. The discount is 
25 per cent., with net extras as follows: 
I and 2 lb. hank-. 25c. per 100 lb.; .Clb. 
hanks, 37Jc. and \ lb. hanks, 50c. 



BRASS WIRE. Some business has been 
done this week, at a discount of (id per 
cent. 

PRESSED SPIKES. Trade in this line 
is no more than fair. The discount is 
unchanged from 20 per cent. 

FENCE STAPLES. The demand is very 

lieht. The price is $3 per 10(1 lb. keg, 
for galvanized, and S2.s|| per Kill lb. kee 
for bright, with an extra of 25c. for 25 
and 50-tb. packages. 

CI T NAILS. These remain at $2. 15 
f.o.b. Montreal, with a Fairly good trade 
doing. 

WIRE NAILS.- There is ,„, change. 
The demand is satisfactory for this sea 
son of tin' year, and orders are filled at 
$2. 10 per keg in carlots. and $2.45 per 
keg in small lots, f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal. London, Hamilton, Toronto. 
Brantford, Windsor, Out., and St. .John. 

HORSRNATLS— There is some demand 
for horsenails this week. No change in 
the discounts has been made, and they 
remain as follows ; "M" brand, "Oval" 
and "New City" heads, 55 per cent. ; 
"Countersunk" heads, 55 per cent. ; "C 
brand. 10, 10 and 7-j per cent, off ; 
"Monarch," 5(1 and 7-J per cent., and 
"Peerless," 50 per cent. 

BORSE SHOES. — Business in horseshoes 
continues rather quiet. Prices are un- 
changed, and we quote : Iron shoes, 
light and medium pattern. No. 2 and 
larger, $3.65 ; No. 1 and smaller. $3.90 ; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90 ; 
No. 1 and smaller, 84.15; X.L. steel 
shoes, new, light pattern, sizes 1 to 5, 
No. 2 and larger, *3.N0 ; No. 1 and 
smaller. 84.05 ; featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4, 85.35, toe weight,- all sizes, 1 to 
I, $6.60. Shoes, more than one size in 
a keg, 10c. per keg extra f.o.b. Montreal 
only. 

RIVETS AND BURRS.— An improvement 
in the demand is reported this week, 
though the movement is still light. The 
discounts are as follows : Best iron 
rivets, section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swedes rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent.; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, oil ; copper rivets, with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent, 
oil', and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb. carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

BOLTS AND NITS. -The market is 
quite active for the season. We quote 
the discounts as follows: Common car- 
riage bolts, 50 per cent.; full square car- 
riage. 55 ; machine, 50 and 5 ; coach 
screws, 66 2-3 ; sleighshoe bolts, 65 and 
5 ; blank bolts, 50 and 5 ; bolt ends, 
50 and 5 ; plough bolts, 50 and 5 ; tire 
bolts, 67 \ per cent.: stove bolts, 67 !, per 
cent. Nuts, square, 3jC. per lb. off list ; 

hexagon nuts. 3fc. per lb. off list. 

SCREWS. — There has not been much 
done in screws this week, though a small 
business has transpired, with discounts 
as follows : Hound head bright, 82$ per 
(.lit.; Hat head bright, s 7.\ per cent.; 
brass, round head. 75 per cent.: brass. 
flat head, 80 i>er cent. 

36 



CORDAGE. Considering the season of 
the year, the demand for cordage is not 
bad. There is quite a rush ill the de- 
mand for hay fork rope. Quotations are 
as follows: Pure manilla, II.Uv; British 
pure manilla. 12c; sisal. I I .'c. ; double 

lathy arn, I IV.; single lathyarn lie. ; 

cotton rope. Kijc; cotton twine, 17 and 
20c for 3 and 1 ply. Cotton bed cord. 
On to 81-35. according to length. 

BINDER TWINE- Still some small 
orders are being received, and ((notations 
ranee from 10-J to 13c. 

BUILDING PAPER.— This continues to 
move out fairly well. Prices are un 
changed, quotations are : 'faired felt, 

$1.85 per 100 lb.; 2 ply ready rofing, 00c. 
per roll; 3-plv, $1.15 per roll; carpet 
felt, 82.25 per liio lb.; dry sheathing, 10c. 
per roll ; tar sheathing, 50c. per roll ; 
dry fibre, 55c. per roll ; tarred fibre, 65c. 
per roll ; O.K. and I.X.L., 70c. per roll ; 
heavy straw and sheathing, $35 per ton ; 
slaters' felt, 65c. per roll. 

SHOT. — The discount has been increased 
2! per cent. Trade is fair. We quote : 
Ordinary drop shot, A. A. A. to dust, 

$6.50 per 100 lb.; (hilled. Nos. I to 10, 
87 per 100 lb.; buck and seal. 87.50 per 
100 lb.; ball, 88 per 100 tt>. Trade dis- 
count I7.V per cent, f.o.b. Montreal, To- 
ronto, Hamilton, London, St. John, N. 
B., and Halifax. 

FIREBRICKS.— These continue to move 
out well at unchanged prices. English 
firebricks sell at $16 to s-_>-2 per $1,000, 
and Scotch at 817 to 822 per 1. 000, ac 
cording to brand. 

CEMENT. — A fair amount of business 
has been done this week, and prices are 
as follows: Canadian cement. 8100 to 
82.25; German, $2.25 to $2.40 ; English, 
82.15 to 82.25; Belgian, 81.70 to 81.05 
per bbl. ex-store, and American. S2.20 to 
82.40 ex-cars. 

SCREEN WIRE CLOTH.- This is inov 
tng out rapidly. The net price is $1.50 
per 100 square feet. 

POULTRY NETTING. -In spite of the 
advanced stage of the season, there is 
still a fair business doing. The discount 
is 60 per cent. 

METALS 

Apart from the increase of 5 per cent. 
in the discount on lead pipe, no quotable 
change is reported in the local metal 
market. The market as a whole is not 
particularly active, though in some lines 
a fair volume of business is passing. The 
iron and steel markets are still active, 
and an improvement is reported in the 
demand for merchant steel and pipe. 
Railway requirements are also in demand, 

PIG IRON.— The consumption of pig 
iron continues heavy, though many pros- 
pective buyers are thought to be holding 
oil' for the lowest possible prices. We 
quote: Carroll, No. 1. $21 ; do.. No. 3. 
810.75; Middlesboro'. No. :'.. 817.75; 
Ayersome. No. 1, 820; do., No. 3, $10.40. 

BAR IRON.— Trade continues on the 
ipiiet side, though in merchants' bar, a 
little better business is doing. Quota- 



THE MARKETS 



H m r 1 1 ■ 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

31 WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 
. . FULL STOCK . . 

Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

™ CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ONT. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 



Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery wht»re great strength 
is r quired • Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



"MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Price to Sales Agents 

Orummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT. Limited 



tions are Merchants' bar, IS ; b 
sin.,' iron, 82.26 . fi ii get) iron, i 

BLACK SHI. I. I 8 rhere i h 

We quote : 28 

12.40; 1-1 t.i -21 gauge, 82 :',-, ; i- to 

20 gauge, 82.30 ami 8 to 10 --. 10. 

GALV WIZKD [RON I - : i only 

fan. Prices air ae Follows 28, Queen's 
II. -ail. si, in ; Apollo, I", ../ . 14 30 
Fleur ilr Lis. $4.15 ■ Comet, 94 : I'- II 
brand, sin."). In less than case lots 25c 

'•\ 1 1 a 

IK \l) PIPE'. The diHcouiil i- imu .',:> 
per cent, instead of 30 pel cenl I 

position and waste sells at Be, ami oi 
dinarj at 7c. 

IRON PIPE. The. market continui 
live for iron pipe, though there are no 
quotable changes. Prices air as Follows: 
Standard pipe, per 100 It., in lengths un 

der 19 ft , Black. | . 82 Hi ; : ; . 82.65 ; !. 
82.85 ; ;. 83.65 ; I in.. 85.20 • I |. 
87.35 ; LJ, ss.;t5 ; -1 in., 812.55. Gal 
\ani/iMi. ! . 83.20 : g, 83. [5 : ',. 83.85 ; 

,'. 85 ; I i,,.. ST.-JH ; I ! . 110.05 ; I '. . 

812.20 ; -J in., 816.85. Extra h 
pipe, plain ends, are quoted per Mmi ft. 
as follows: Black, .'.. 84.20; ;'. 85.25; 
l in.. s7 :.:. ; 1 |. sin..-;-, ; 1.',. 812.75 ; 1 
in.. 817.60. Galvanized, ',. 85.20 ; •,'. 
86.65; I in.. 89.55; l|. 813:25; I 1 . 816; 
•1 in.. 821.90. 

TTNPLATES.— There is not much doing 
in tinplates. Cokes are quoted at 81 
ami charcoals at 84.25. 

TERNE PLATES. The market is dull 
and Featureless. The price remains at 

S7.25. 

COIL CHAINS. The volume of busi 
ni'ss in chain is not large though there 
are still some orders being received. Quo 
tations are as follows: \o. 1;, [0c; No. 
•"'. 9c; No. I, s.'.r.; No. .'!. 7c; 1 in.. 
•Lie; 5 Hi in., 84.90 : | in.. 84.20 ; 7 16 
in., xi : .'. in.. 83.90 ; !i It; in.. s:;.75 ; \ i,,.. 
83.60 ; I in.. 83.50 ; I in.. 83. la ; anil I 
in.. 83.40, with 10c. allowance on carlots. 

CANADA PLATES. There is no change 
in tlir prici' locally. Our quotations are: 
2s, s-j.cii to 82.70 : fids. 82.70 to 82.80 ; 
75s, 82.80 to 82.85 ; full polished, 83.75 
and galvanized, 84.25 to 84.35; galvan 
i/cd. (ills. si. 15 1() si. .-,.-,. 

STEEL.— Trade is not particularlj ac 
tive this week. Prices an- unchanged, as 
follows: Mild, s-2.ii.-> ; sleighshoe, #2.10 
to 82.20; tire. 82.15 to *2:2:, ■ spring, 
82.85 t<> 83 . reeled machinery, s-j,7a to 
83 ; toecalk, *'2j\u to s-_',75 ; machinery 
(iron linish). 82.10; mild steel, 82.05; 
square harrow . 82.50. 

TOOL STEEL.- There is very little do- 
ing. We quote : Black Diamond. 8 to 
'.'c: Sanderson's. 8 to 9c, according to 
the grade ; Jessop's, 13c; Leonard's, 
7.U-.; Jonas iV Colver's, In to 20c; "Air 
Hardening," 50 to 65c per IK 

INGOT COPPER. There is no change. 
Little business is doing. The price is 
815.50 to si:,. :;,. 

INGOT TIN.— The market remains quiet 

at s:>:> t„ s:!:',.7r. per 100 II. . 

I'li; LEAD.— A small amount of busi- 
ness has transpired this week at 83.16 to 

83.25. 

SOLDER. Trade continues quite active 
at 20c for liar and 19c for wire solder. 

ZINC SPELTER. Nothing doing. We 
quote 85. i 5. 

SHEET /INC. Trade is dull at 86.50 
to 86.75. 



TINPLATES 



DOMINION CROWN 

coal, tissn.M. 

ALLAWAYS Best Charcoal. 
CANADA CROWN "—Charcoal. 
LYDBROOK 
TRVM 



oke. 

All standard brands. Accept no substitute. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



THE FIRST 

and most important 
thing to know about 
a pump is that it is 
good and will work 
properly. 

McDougall Pumps 
are the best made in 
Canada to-day, and 
are guaranteed to 
work right. 

Do you want our 
catalogue' It's Inc. 



The R. McDougall Co., limited 

MADE IN PAIT ONT 

Canada. GALT, ONT. 



Pig Tin 

BOUSTEAD & CO.'S PENANG. 

INGOT COPPER 

LAKE AND CASTING. 

PIG LEAD 
SPELTER 
ANTIMONY 
PIG IRON 




ADAM HOPE & CO. 

Hamilton. Ont. 

Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u^ 

NEW GLASGOW, l.S- 

et- 




A*d SUUUUIS MAAVni 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware knd 
Metal 



THE MARKETS 



SCRAP METALH. 

not much doing in snap metals 
at the present season. Iron i- Bome- 
wliat quieter than it was. ami No. I 
wrought o 81 lower. Copper is 

ulao .hill though there is no change in 
Rubbers are also lower, about |e 
We quote HeaVy copper and 

w Hi'. 

hea* \ 



light 



l„i lb.; light copper, 9c; 
red brass, 10c; heavy yellow, B^c; 
; lead, 2 to 2$c.; zin< . 
iron, No. 1 wrought 815 to 
57 ."in per ton ; machinery 
: stove plate, 813 



malleable and steel, 86 . mixed country 
60 to 70c. per 100 lb.; old rubbers, 
6 i.' 6Jc. per lb. 

HIDES. 

The market is somewhal unsettled this 
week owing to the operations ol <>|i|msi 
tiuii buyers on the market. We quote: 
No I hides, 9c. : No. 2, 8c.; No. 3, 7c; 
\... I calfskins, lie; No. 2, 9c. Lamb- 
skins, ■'!■"><■. 

RAW FURS. 

There is nothing to report in the way 
of change, prices ruling same as last 
week. We quote 



l;l \ vkii I abrmdor unit choice Baatern 

Territory Rook; Mountains and n i stern 
Strictly Prime, nr. No. 1 

Curtly Prime, or. No. 2 

rjnpnme, or. No 3 

Flat, ireak, or poor, or, No. 4 



WIRE NAILS, \ fair trad.- is doing. 

Our quotations arc as follows ; (allots, 

82.40, and small lots. 82.45 per keg f.o.b. 
Gananoque, Montreal. London, Samilton, 
Toronto, Brantford, Windsor, Ont., and 
St. John. 

CUT NAILS. Orders continue to come 
in. particularly [or shingle nails. It is 
noted that the demand for cut shingle 
nails is larger than usual this Near, as 
compared with the demand for wire 
shingle nails. We quote the base for 
naiU at 82.50 per keg f.o.b. Toronto. 

HORSE \ \ll.s. There is a moderate 
demand. Prices are steady. We quote: 
"('" brand, oval head. Ill and 10 and 7-J 
per rent.; on " M I march ." 60 per cent.; 
"M," "Oval" and "Countersunk" head. 
55 per cent.; on "Peerless." 15 and 7 \ 
per cent. 

HORSE SHOPS. Business is fair. Our 
quotations arc : f.o.b. Toronto ; Iron 
shoes. No. 'J and larger, 83.80 ; No. 1 
and smaller-. 84.05. Steel. new light 

shoes. No. 2 and larger, 83.95; No. 1 
and smaller. $4.20. Snow shoes, No. 2 
and larger, 84.05 ; No. I and lighter, 
84.30. If shipped from factory, 10 to 
15c less. 



Large 
$6.00 

6.00 
4.00 
3.00 
2.50 



Medi in .Small 
$5.00 $2.75 



4.00 
3.00 
2.00 
.50 



2.00 
2.00 
.75 
.25 



Large Medi'm Small 



BF.ai: Black Choice only 15.00 

Brown " 12 <j° 

IS A.IMJER— Of all sections -50 

Dark 

FISHER Eastern and far Nnrlli-Eustern 6.50 

Territory ami Western 6.50 

Large 
FOX -Bed— North-Eastern anil similar fine bright red kinds.... 4.00 
Territory ami Western *■ Op- 
Dark 
Cross- Value principally as to beauty, also size 4 richness 10.00 

Silver Eastern and far Northern liS°cn 

Pacific Coast. Territory and Western 50.00-hO 

Large Medi m Small 

LYNX- Far North-Eastern 4.00-8.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2 to 4.00 

■ Terri.or and Welstern. 4.OHS.00 6.00 4 to 5.00 2.00 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

M A UTEN-Britu* Columbia. Northern Pacific and similar... 7.00 5.00 3.50 1.75 to2.50 

Tcri-ilnrv ftn.l Westprn 7.00 2.25 1.50 1.00 

(VuXcLid omart ::.•.•.■.■:.•.■::::.■. 3.00-3.502^-3.00 >*. %» 1.00 

Large Medi m Small 2 Large 2 

MINK Halifax, far North-Eastern and choice *£} ?•?'« 3™ 2 « 

Territory and Western 1.50-2.00 1.50 1.00 .75 

Sprinf 



10.00 
7.00 
2 

.25 

Brown 

5.00 

5.00 ' 

Small 

2.75 

2.75 

Fair 

7.00 

50.00 

35.00 



7.50 

5.00 
3 

.10 

Pale 

5.00 

3.50 

2 

1.25 

1.40 

Pale 

4.00 

25.00 

20.00 



Kitts 
$1-1.50 

.50-.75 
.SO 
.40 
.25 
2 
6.00 



as i 

=38 j; 

3 

3.00 



Cubs. Yearl's 

$2.00 to $8.00 

1.00 to 5.00 



4 

.05 
2 

3.00 

2.00 

3 

.75 

.50 

2 

2.50 

20.00 

15.00 

2 



3 

1.75 
1.00 

4 

.20 

.20 

3 
1.50 
9.00 
5.00 

3 
1.00 

.60 

3 
1.00 

.60 

.50 
Small 
1.50 



Winter Fall Kitts 



4 

.50 

.50 



4 

.50 
4.50 
2.50 

.25 

•20 

4 

.25 

.20 

.25 

3 

.40 

.25 



.25 
.15-25 



,10to.l3 8tol0 2 to 5 

5 to. 10 .07 2 to 4 

Small 2 3 

7.00-10 10.00-12 2.50-5 

4.50 3.50 to 5 2.25 

Small 2 3 

RAOOON 75-1.25 .60-75 .33-50 .25 

Biack-Vaiue according to darkness, size and beauty 2.25 2-00 100 .50 

Black Sh rt StLong St White 

BKtTNB 75-1.25 .75 .4O-.50 .05-15 

Dark Brown Pale 2 

WOLVERINE- Value according to darkness, size and beauty.. 5.00 4.00 2.50 1.50 



HD8KBAT Eastern, best large % 28t '- 

Territory and Western 20c. 

Large 

OTTER— Labrador and far North-Eastern S10 

" Territory and Western 4.00 

Large 



4 
! to 4.00 
.50 
4 

.15 
.25 



Cubs 
1.00 to $2.00 
.25 to .50 



4 
.25 



f ASTOKF.l'.M - 



.85.00 to $6.00 per pound. 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 
HARDWAHtz. 

Toronto, July 21, 1903. 
"\ T r HILE the midsummer quietness has 
YY practically arrived, and while 
some houst are giving their 
travellers holidays, there is an excellent 
business for this season of the year. 
Letter orders are numerous, but not 
heavy. There is a shortage in cut shingle 
nails, some sizes of bolte and nuts, heavy 
and light T and strap barn door hinges. 
Poultry netting is advancing. The die 

count on lead pipe has been increased to 
35 per cent., compared with 30 per cent., 
and on shot from 15 per cent, to 17i per 
cent. Otherwise there is no change. 

FENCE WIRE. There are a few orders 

coming in for all grades. Prices are 
dy at la quotations. 



SCREWS. — Jobbers are having less 
difficulty in filling their orders. Quota- 
tions are : Flat head bright, 87^ per cent, 
discount ; round head bright, 82£ per 
cent.; flat head brass, SO per cent.; round 
head brass, 75 per cent.; round head 
bronze, 70 per cent.; flat head bronze, 75 
per